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TOPIC: Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care

Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 29 May 2019 11:08 #1

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This thread is a continuation of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care.

I am glad to see that there is a public interest law firm that was established in the state of Alaska in 2002 called The Law Project for Psychiatric Rights (PsychRights):

The Law Project for Psychiatric Rights (PsychRights) is a non-profit, tax exempt 501(c)(3) public interest law firm whose mission is to mount a strategic litigation campaign against forced psychiatric drugging and electroshock in the United States akin to what Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP mounted in the 40's and 50's on behalf of African American civil rights. The public mental health system is creating a huge class of chronic mental patients through forcing them to take ineffective, yet extremely harmful drugs. As part of its mission, PsychRights is further dedicated to exposing the truth about these drugs and the courts being misled into ordering people to be drugged and subjected to other brain and body damaging interventions against their will. Due to the pervasive psychiatric drugging of children and youth, PsychRights has made attacking this problem a priority. Children are virtually always forced to take these drugs because it is the adults in their lives who are making the decision. This is an unfolding national tragedy of immense proportions.

psychrights.org/

On that website there are links for people looking for information pertaining to other states of the United States as well as international.

The President & CEO of this law firm is Jim Gottstein.

He has a YouTube channel:



Description

The PsychRights Channel is part of the public education program of the Law Project for Psychiatric Rights exposing the truth about psychiatric practices.

www.youtube.com/user/jimgotts/about

One of the videos on the channel is “Grace Jackson, MD: Building a Better Understanding of the Antidepressants.”

It shows a talk given before an organization called the International Society for Ethical Psychology & Psychiatry (ISEPP), which has been sponsoring conferences since 1997:

Jim Gottstein
Published on Jul 10, 2018

In this talk at the 2016 conference of the International Society for Ethical Psychology and Psychiatry (ISEPP), Dr. Grace Jackson discusses a myriad of problems with antidepressants

Category
Nonprofits & Activism


In the presentation she points out that patients get put on psychiatric medications by regular doctors, so it’s not just psychiatrists who need to change what they do, but the whole medical community.

She also talks about scientific findings about adverse effects of psychiatric meds that are not in text books or continuing education curricula for doctors.

The training doctors get is what needs to change.
Last Edit: 01 Jun 2019 18:28 by Connect Dots. Reason: Add link
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 30 May 2019 11:24 #2

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Connect Dots wrote:

One of the videos on the channel is “Grace Jackson, MD: Building a Better Understanding of the Antidepressants.”

It shows a talk given before an organization called the International Society for Ethical Psychology & Psychiatry (ISEPP), which has been sponsoring conferences since 1997. . .

Here is information about ISEPP’s leadership. It is about the Executive Director:
11/2/2015
Executive Director



Chuck Ruby, Ph.D.

Dr. Ruby earned his Ph.D. in 1995 at Florida State University. He is a retired U.S. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel with 20 years of military service as a criminal and counterintelligence special agent and investigative psychologist in many capacities across the globe.

He is currently the Director and General Manager of the Pinnacle Center for Mental Health and Human Relations, a private group practice in southern Maryland that offers a variety of evaluation and therapy services. He is also a psychotherapist and coach, addressing emotional and behavioral problems as natural human reactions in life, rather than as dysfunction or disease. He helps people use their inherent abilities in reorganizing and reconstructing their lives in order to help them find a sense of contentment.

Dr. Ruby rejects the idea of "mental illness" as it is a misleading metaphor that creates diseases and disabilities out of basic human struggles. He likewise disagrees with, and strongly cautions against, the use of psychiatric drugs as they do not correct any so-called chemical imbalances of the brain, and they have many harmful effects and lead to dependency. Dr. Ruby recognizes that as humans we all share the difficult challenges of finding meaning, accepting our limitations, connecting with others, and taking responsibility for the ultimate direction of our lives.

Dr. Ruby is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Society for Humanistic Psychology, and Psychologists for Social Responsibility. He is the past Chairperson of the Board for ISEPP and has been the Executive Director since 2015.

psychintegrity.org/isepp-leadership/

“Dr. Ruby rejects the idea of 'mental illness' as it is a misleading metaphor that creates diseases and disabilities out of basic human struggles.”

Well said!!

That statement speaks to the new paradigm that is needed in psychiatry.

The new paradigm needs to be drug-free and shock treatment-free patient-centered support, which requires empathy from the psychiatrist.

See the thread Psychiatrist Peter Breggin.
Last Edit: 30 May 2019 11:26 by Connect Dots. Reason: Punctuation
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 31 May 2019 15:15 #3

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First, a definition:

Here is a presentation by a psychiatric survivor:
PechaKucha YYC
Published on Oct 6, 2018

Margaret Fong speaks at PechaKucha Night Calgary #34: Trial. Margaret is a psychiatric survivor and a holistic health junkie who extols the benefits of meditation. She is an author at Mad in America.



YouTube link



". . . define a psychiatric survivor as someone who has unnecessarily been harmed or traumatized by psychiatric care based on a biomedical model of a broken brain . . . "
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 01 Jun 2019 13:54 #4

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The following excerpt is from the Mad in America website “Personal Stories” section. It is within the context of a reaction of a psychiatric survivor to a debate for and against antipsychotic drugs:
. . . From Psychotic To Well: My Story

. . . I’m a 31-year-old formerly psychotic man. In my late teens and early 20s, following a childhood of severe physical and emotional abuse, I suffered through many psychotic experiences. These included hearing persecutory voices telling me to kill myself, holding paranoid beliefs about strangers wanting to harm me, feeling unremitting terror for months at a time, and being unable to function in school or work for about two years. During this period, I was quite literally on the edge, suffering through an almost minute-to-minute, second-to-second struggle full of rage, despair, confusion, voice-hearing and paranoia.

Not surprisingly I was psychiatrically hospitalized twice, with one hospitalization occurring after a failed suicide attempt. In the mental health system, I received all the severe psychiatric diagnoses including “schizophrenia.” I took multiple antipsychotic drugs including Seroquel and Zyprexa. Additionally, my father was psychiatrically hospitalized on multiple occasions, labeled “bipolar,” and given ECT and antipsychotic drugs.

The main causes of my psychotic experiences lay in my life story: physical abuse by my father, a lack of trust and security with my parents, the stress of many childhood moves to different countries, having been severely bullied in school, and the pressure of having to function independently as a young adult. The worst of the abuses I experienced included being thrown across rooms onto sharp table edges, having boiling hot drinks poured onto me, and being ridiculed for my skin color and appearance – enough to drive most people crazy! But the worst experience of all was being in a psychic black hole where I felt totally alone and could not trust anyone.

. . . Fast forward a decade: I am now quite functional, having worked a steady, professional job for most of the last several years, as well as being socially active. I no longer have significant levels of psychotic experience, no longer hear voices, no longer feel paranoid about strangers harming me. I am often calm now, and I feel quite alive and enjoy what I do. How did this happen?

Well, facing the long emotional war, I never gave up. Through my own research, I eventually found out that the incurable brain disease narrative was wrong. I became a fighter, promising myself that I would get well and do what I wanted to do. The process of working through my psychotic experiences and coming to trust others was extremely difficult, requiring great patience and perseverance, but I gradually accomplished it.

Starting in my early 20s, I derived great benefit from an intensive psychotherapy in which I explored the origin and meaning of my paranoid fears and persecutory voices. In this setting I was able to form a deeply trusting relationship with another person for the first time. As I overcame my fear of trusting and recounted my traumas, I gradually stopped experiencing voices, paranoid suspicions, and extremes of rage and terror.

I was fortunate to encounter a therapist who believed psychotic people could get well, and to have some financial support from my family. I made a couple of friends with whom I could share my story and who supported me no matter what. I found a field of work that I love. And today, having chosen to carefully taper off of them, I no longer take antipsychotic drugs. . .

www.madinamerica.com/2016/09/rejecting-the-medications-for-schizophrenia-narrative-a-survivors-response-to-pies-and-whitaker/
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 01 Jun 2019 14:06 #5

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The author of that article has coined two very useful terms:

"patientification" - adopting a sick role and believing one has a lifelong brain disease
"zombification" - taking too many antipsychotics for too long and losing touch with one's emotions
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 01 Jun 2019 17:13 #6

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I'm glad to see there is an organization called The International Society for Psychological and Social Approaches to Psychosis (ISPS):
Welcome to ISPS

ISPS is an international organization promoting psychological and social treatments for persons with psychosis (a term which includes persons diagnosed with "schizophrenia"). We are committed to advancing education, training and knowledge of mental health professionals in the treatment and prevention of psychotic mental disorders. We seek to achieve the best possible outcomes for service user/survivors of psychosis by engaging in meaningful partnership with health professionals, people with lived experience, family members and carers.

www.isps.org/

From their website:
Schizophrenia doesn’t exist

Most members of ISPS are of the opinion that schizophrenia as a distinct disease entity does not exist, and that this label does unnecessary harm to persons suffering from psychosis. In this section, you will find information supporting the thesis that the diagnosis of schizophrenia has been detrimental and scientifically invalid, as well as a solution: simply describe the symptoms which people experience. This approach also provides more specificity for scientific research. . .

www.isps.org/index.php/learning-resources/learning-resources/2015-11-09-12-02-59/schizophrenia-doesn-t-exist
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 03 Jun 2019 11:47 #7

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“Their mum had become a dribbling monster unable to love them.”

That is from a Mad in America personal story entitled "Pills That Steal Generations of Lives," about a near-suicide caused by drugs with a happy ending after getting off the drugs:
. . . I decided to make a film, and write a book. When I began, exactly a year ago, I had no idea of the extraordinary discoveries I was about to make. There were big pharma cover-ups, hidden trials, stories of terrible tragedies and compelling evidence that antidepressant-induced psychosis is behind some of the world’s worst killings. . .

www.madinamerica.com/2016/10/pills-steal-generations-lives/


The Pill That Steals Lives: One Woman's Terrifying Journey to Discover the Truth about Antidepressants Paperback – September 15, 2016
by Katinka Blackford Newman (Author)

Amazon link
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 03 Jun 2019 21:40 #8

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From a Mad in America personal story:
. . . I was first hospitalized at age sixteen after the death of my grandmother. She was a genius with a photographic memory and she understood me. When I sat with her I didn’t feel like a freak or a misfit. I was just me, and she made space for all my quirks. Once she was gone, my safe space was gone and I never fully recovered. Looking back now I believe I was hospitalized for grief, but labeled with disorder. . .

www.madinamerica.com/2016/09/backing-away-from-psychiatry/
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 04 Jun 2019 14:02 #9

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There is a non-profit, public benefit organization, Point of Return, Inc., where people seeking to get off psychiatric drugs can get help:

Alesandra Rain, the co-founder, is the author of a book Take as Directed:
Her story is a riveting chronicle of her struggle with benzodiazepine, sleeping pill and antidepressant dependence. She has endured over thirty surgeries and it was through all her struggles that her life mission emerged.

This is not a book about addiction, it’s about choosing a healthier path while exposing the deception that has changed how western medicine is practiced today. . .

pointofreturn.com/products/take-as-directed
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 Jun 2019 12:50 #10

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“ . . . almost all states and almost all physicians in the United States, also nurses and pharmacists, have to do a certain number of hours of continuing education a year. Well, everyone likes free continuing education and most of the free continuing education is funded by pharmaceutical companies and other medical companies and it always has marketing messages in them.”

That is from the transcript of a Mad in America Radio interview dated June 5, 2019 entitled Getting Pharma Out of Medical Education: An Interview with Dr. Adriane Fugh-Berman.

Dr. Adriane Fugh-Berman is associated with a group called PharmedOut that started ten years ago with grant money from a government lawsuit against pharmaceutical manufacturers for off-label promotion of a drug called Neurontin.

It is good to see that a group is working on the huge problem of inappropriate influence of profit-seeking corporations at least on continuing medical education. It’s needed for medical schools, too, but at least it’s a beginning.

Another problem they’re working on is disease creation:
. . . There’s nothing to prevent pharmaceutical companies from just creating diseases, or subdividing diseases further. And, of course, they have specific drugs available for each of the diseases that they create. For example, making lots of different flavors of depression so that they can position their particular drug for a particular flavor of depression or a particular flavor of anxiety. This is all done for market positioning and it’s not necessarily helpful for patients. In fact, it can make many people feel ill when really there’s nothing wrong with them, or there’s just a normal human variant of personality, for example.

www.madinamerica.com/2019/06/getting-pharma-medical-education-interview-dr-adriane-fugh-berman/
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 16 Jun 2019 15:13 #11

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Part of the movement to reform psychiatry is the National Empowerment Center.

That organization sponsored this presentation by clinical psychologist and author Bruce Levine:
RecoveryandHope
Published on Nov 25, 2015

Bruce Levine presentation "The Anti-Authoritarian Movement to Rehumanize Mental Health"



YouTube link
Questioning the accepted paradigm for psychiatry is a task for independent thinkers.

But the harm of medicating children for normal albeit challenging behavior is helping to motivate these independent thinkers to speak out.
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 16 Jun 2019 19:38 #12

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An alternative to psychiatric hospitalization is peer-run crisis respite programs:
RecoveryandHope
Published on Oct 11, 2011

This video provides an introduction to four successful peer run programs: Voices of the Heart Respite House, Georgia Peer Support and Wellness Center Respite House, Rose House, and Keya House. . .



YouTube link
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 17 Jun 2019 16:14 #13

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There is a barbaric practice used in psychiatry called electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).

Regarding a court case in relation to ECT:
. . . In October of 2018, in Riera v. Somatics, LLC, the United States District Court for the Central District of California ruled that there was sufficient evidence for a reasonable jury to find that the prominent manufacturer of ECT devices, Somatics, LLC, caused brain injury in the plaintiffs by failing to warn their treating physicians of the risk of brain injury associated with ECT, and also through a failure to investigate and report to the FDA complaints of brain damage and death resulting from ECT. . . .

www.madinamerica.com/2019/06/ect-litigation-patients-not-warned-brain-damage-risk/
I'm glad to see that the Mad in America website is supporting legal efforts to reform psychiatry.
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 18 Jun 2019 12:51 #14

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In my opinion 'psychiatric care' is an overblown concept and doesn't really work.

Most of the mental illness comes from the fact that we are living in a completely upside-down and degenerate world where people are being bombarded with negativity and weirdness all throughout the day by the mass media.

So one may thank the jews for all the depressed and mentally deranged people within our society.

It's not for no reason the Germans were the happiest and healthiest people between 1933 - 1939 when Hitler had freed them of the jewish chains they had laid upon them.
Everyone is entitled to his own opinions, but not to his own facts. - Daniel Patrick Moynihan
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 18 Jun 2019 14:39 #15

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Flare wrote:
In my opinion 'psychiatric care' is an overblown concept and doesn't really work.

Most of the mental illness comes from the fact that we are living in a completely upside-down and degenerate world where people are being bombarded with negativity and weirdness all throughout the day by the mass media.

So one may thank the jews for all the depressed and mentally deranged people within our society.

It's not for no reason the Germans were the happiest and healthiest people between 1933 - 1939 when Hitler had freed them of the jewish chains they had laid upon them.
I agree that the world is a mess and we have to expose the wrongs that have created it.

But that is in addition to, not instead of, exposing the bogus foundation for psychiatry today, which is the unfounded "biochemical imbalance" theory which underlies the drugging of people with neurotoxins.

That, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), has got to stop.
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 18 Jun 2019 20:22 #16

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From a personal story:
. . .The substance-free view is so different, at times dizzying with the wondrous vastness of life. As being med-free has blown my consciousness wide open, I struggle with the basic mechanics and maintenance of life. It is a challenge to find my place in society and not get lost in the shuffle. I get tripped up by mundane things that I take as reminders for me to stay slow and steady, which makes it a challenge to integrate more life changes more quickly. Time continues to slip away and I did not attain the goals I had in mind for my first-year-plus med-free, but I thank the Creator for this thoroughly frustrating yet humbling experience. I have so much to be grateful for. I can sleep without drugs and I can cry when I need to again! . . .

www.madinamerica.com/2019/04/snapshots-of-spring-journeying-off-psych-meds-after-20-years/
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 02 Jul 2019 11:54 #17

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Regarding the use of antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs:
Anticholinergic Psychiatric Drugs Linked to a 50% Increase in Dementia
By Peter Simons July 2, 2019

People who take anticholinergic drugs, including antidepressants and antipsychotics, are at a 50% higher risk of dementia than the average population, according to a new study. The researchers suggested that the adverse effects of these drugs may result in about 20,000 cases of dementia per year in the UK alone. . .

www.madinamerica.com/2019/07/anticholinergic-psychiatric-drugs-linked-50-increase-dementia/
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 03 Jul 2019 11:55 #18

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There is work being done to come up with a better alternative to "diagnosing" mental distress as if it has a biochemical cause. There is something called the Power Threat Meaning Framework (PTMF):
Last year, Lucy Johnstone, Mary Boyle and their colleagues in the UK launched the Power Threat Meaning Framework (PTMF), a set of ideas that represented a sharp departure from the biomedical conceptions that animate the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). This framework shifts the notion of “What is wrong with you?” in the DSM to “What has happened to you?” and by doing rejects medical process of diagnosing “disorders” in favor of a narrative response that tells of contexts, power dynamics, and systems.

www.madinamerica.com/2019/07/creation-conceptual-alternative-dsm-interview-lucy-johnstone/
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 03 Jul 2019 18:22 #19

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If patients feel that their meds aren't doing them any good, or are making them worse, why don't they simply stop taking them?
For example some years ago I went to my doctor feeling cold and sluggish so she prescribed anti-depressants even though I told her I wasn't depressed, but she wouldn't listen, she never gave me any kind of examination or blood test.
I started taking them on the off chance she was right, but they made me feel woozy, not knowing if I was awake or asleep, so I stopped taking them and flushed them down the toilet.
PS- It later transpired that my cold and sluggishness was caused by an underactive thyroid, but as I say, the quack never tested me for that or anything else.
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Part Two of Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 03 Jul 2019 19:57 #20

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Ugh wrote:
If patients feel that their meds aren't doing them any good, or are making them worse, why don't they simply stop taking them?
Some people feel pressured by those around them to do what mainstream medicine says to do.

This thread is to help people gain confidence to go up against the mainstream.
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