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TOPIC: Surveillance State

Surveillance State 26 Feb 2015 06:52 #1

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Surveillance State 02 Mar 2015 02:49 #2

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Singapore an advanced surveillance state, but citizens don’t mind
However, the news, which suggests that the state has the resources to spy on its own citizens, got little traction within the country. Revealed in August, the pageviews only snowballed recently, and even so, it garnered a weaker reaction than the entrance of extra-marital dating site Ashley Madison into Singapore, a move which sparked an outcry among conservative Singaporeans.

It seems that citizens are more concerned about moral policing than the possibility of having their actions monitored by the state
www.techinasia.com/singapore-advanced-surveillance-state-citizens-mind/
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Surveillance State 03 Mar 2015 07:46 #3

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Russia's Surveillance State
On Friday, February 27, the body of Russian opposition leader and former Deputy Prime Minister Boris Nemtsov was found slain from four gunshot wounds in the back on a bridge not far from the Kremlin. In the Fall 2013 issue of World Policy Journal, Russian investigative journalists Andrei Soldatov and Irina Borogan delivered the following report, detailing the Putin administration's development of an extensive surveillance state. Nemtsov's name appeared beside many other activists described in the report as being extensively monitored by the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB). To shed greater light on the circumstances surrounding Nemtsov's murder, we present Soldatov and Borogan's report on the World Policy blog.
www.worldpolicy.org/blog/2015/03/02/russias-surveillance-state
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Surveillance State 03 Mar 2015 07:48 #4

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In Response to EFF Lawsuit, Government Scheduled to Release More Secret Court Opinions on NSA Surveillance

UPDATE: Late tonight, the government released to EFF the "Raw Take" opinion and the 2008 FAA opinion, described below. Those opinions are available here (pdf) and here (pdf). We are reviewing the documents and will post our analysis, along with other documents released by the government, shortly.

Later today, the government is scheduled to release two landmark opinions on NSA spying issued by the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. The documents are being released as a result of FOIA lawsuit filed by EFF last year, seeking disclosure of many of the surveillance court's still-secret, yet significant, opinions
www.eff.org/deeplinks/2015/03/response-eff-lawsuit-government-scheduled-release-more-opinions-secret-court-nsa
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Surveillance State 04 Mar 2015 05:46 #5

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What the Future of Government Surveillance Looks Like
Before the Internet, when surveillance consisted largely of government-on-government espionage, agencies like the NSA would target specific communications circuits: that Soviet undersea cable between Petropavlovsk and Vladivostok, a military communications satellite, a microwave network. This was for the most part passive, requiring large antenna farms in nearby countries

Modern targeted surveillance is likely to involve actively breaking into an adversary’s computer network and installing malicious software designed to take over that network and “exfiltrate” data—that’s NSA talk for stealing it. To put it more plainly, the easiest way for someone to eavesdrop on your communications isn’t to intercept them in transit anymore; it’s to hack your computer.

And there’s a lot of government hacking going on.
In 2011, an Iranian hacker broke into the Dutch certificate authority DigiNotar. This enabled him to impersonate organizations like Google, the CIA, MI6, Mossad, Microsoft, Yahoo, Skype, Facebook, Twitter, and Microsoft’s Windows Update service. That, in turn, allowed him to spy on users of these services. He passed this ability on to others—almost certainly in the Iranian government—who in turn used it for mass surveillance on Iranians and probably foreigners as well. Fox-IT estimated that 300,000 Iranian Gmail accounts were accessed.

In 2009, Canadian security researchers discovered a piece of malware called GhostNet on the Dalai Lama’s computers. It was a sophisticated surveillance network, controlled by a computer in China. Further research found it installed on computers of political, economic, and media organizations in 103 countries—basically a who’s who of Chinese espionage targets. Flame is a surveillance tool that researchers detected on Iranian networks in 2012; these experts believe the United States and Israel put it there and elsewhere. Red October, which hacked and spied on computers worldwide for five years before it was discovered in 2013, is believed to be a Russian surveillance system. So is Turla, which targeted Western government computers and was ferreted out in 2014. The Mask, also discovered in 2014, is believed to be Spanish. Iranian hackers have specifically targeted U.S. officials. There are many more known surveillance tools like these, and presumably others still undiscovered.













(Related: NSA Spying Continues With Another Rubber Stamp)

To be fair, we don’t have proof that these countries were behind these surveillance networks, nor that they were government-sponsored. Governments almost never admit to hacking each other’s computers. Researchers generally infer the country of origin from the target list. For example, The Mask target list included almost all Spanish-speaking countries, and a bunch of computers in Morocco and Gibraltar. That sounds like Spain.
In the United States, the group charged with hacking computers is the Tailored Access Operations group (TAO) inside the NSA. We know that TAO infiltrates computers remotely, using programs with cool code names like QUANTUMINSERT and FOXACID. We know that TAO has developed specialized software to hack into everything from computers to routers to smartphones, and that its staff installs hardware “implants” into computer and networking equipment by intercepting and infecting it in transit. One estimate is that the group has successfully hacked into, and is exfiltrating information from, 80,000 computers worldwide.

Of course, most of what we know about TAO and America’s hacking efforts comes from top-secret NSA documents provided by Edward Snowden. There haven’t been similar leaks from other countries, so we know much less about their capabilities.

We do know a lot about China. China has been reliably identified as the origin of many high-profile attacks—against Google, against the Canadian government, against The New York Times, against the security company RSA and other U.S. corporations, and against the U.S. military and its contractors. In 2013, researchers found presumed Chinese government malware targeting Tibetan activists’ Android phones. In 2014, Chinese hackers breached a database of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management that stored detailed data on up to 5 million U.S. government employees and contractors with security clearances.

A lot of this is political and military espionage, but some of it is commercial espionage. Many countries have a long history of spying on foreign corporations for their own military and commercial advantage. The U.S. claims that it does not engage in commercial espionage, meaning that it does not hack foreign corporate networks and pass that information on to U.S. competitors for commercial advantage. But it does engage in economic espionage, by hacking into foreign corporate networks and using that information in government trade negotiations that directly benefit U.S. corporate interests. Recent examples are the Brazilian oil company Petrobras and the European SWIFT international bank-payment system. In fact, according to a 1996 government report, the NSA claimed that the economic benefits of one of its programs to U.S. industry “totaled tens of billions of dollars over the last several years.” You may or may not see a substantive difference between the two types of espionage. China, without so clean a separation between its government and its industries, does not.

Many countries buy software from private companies to facilitate their hacking. Consider an Italian cyberweapons manufacturer called Hacking Team that sells hacking systems to governments worldwide for use against computer and smartphone operating systems. The mobile malware installs itself remotely and collects e-mails, text messages, call history, address books, search-history data, and keystrokes. It can take screenshots, record audio to monitor either calls or ambient noise, snap photos, and monitor the phone’s GPS coordinates. It then surreptitiously sends all of that back to its handlers. Ethiopia used this software to sneak onto the computers of European and American journalists.

www.defenseone.com/technology/2015/03/what-future-government-surveillance-looks/106425/
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Surveillance State 05 Mar 2015 01:50 #6

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I am not necessary advocating it, surveillance, but I think there is an argument legitimizing collecting public information. Take the internet in the early days it was a given that emails were private. I think that this assumption (whether it was factual that they were privet not whether surveillance is justified) collectively was in error. And for privacy should be treated as telling some one, something in public. More so on web forums and public place, expecting privacy is unrealistic, and as demonstrated with above post non existent.
Dominus Membrorum Suorum Nemo Videtur.
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Surveillance State 05 Mar 2015 05:44 #7

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Tacit approval is silent consent. :cool:
Alleged logical arguments are made every single day to strip freedom and liberties from the masses.
Doesn't give those folks in opposition much choice these days.
The logical arguments are theater.
The reality is that privacy is a thing of the past.

:cool:
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Surveillance State 10 Mar 2015 05:01 #8

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The Surveillance State
There are few words that arouse more suspicion among a properly skeptical public than “Trust us; we’re doing what is best for you.”
americamagazine.org/issue/surveillance-state
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Surveillance State 12 Mar 2015 06:07 #9

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Canada Casts Global Surveillance Dragnet Over File Downloads
firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/01/28/canada-cse-levitation-mass-surveillance/
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Surveillance State 22 Mar 2015 08:11 #10

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Surveillance State 22 Mar 2015 08:12 #11

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Surveillance State 22 Mar 2015 08:26 #12

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Surveillance State 22 Mar 2015 10:01 #13

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Surveillance State 22 Mar 2015 10:39 #14

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Surveillance State 25 Mar 2015 07:41 #15

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Britain’s Surveillance State
As things stand now, intelligence agencies can monitor vast amounts of communications and do so with only a warrant from a government minister to begin intercepting them. Lawmakers should limit the amount of data officials can sweep up and require them to obtain warrants from judges, who are more likely to push back against overly broad requests.

The parliamentary committee, however, did not see the need to limit data collection and concluded that ministers should continue to approve warrants because they are better than judges at evaluating diplomatic, political and public interests. That rationale ignores the fact that ministers are also less likely to deny requests from officials who directly report to them.

The committee’s acceptance of the status quo partly reflects the fact that Britons have generally been more accepting of intrusive government surveillance than Americans; security cameras, for instance, are ubiquitous in Britain. But the committee itself was far from impartial. Its nine members were all nominated by Prime Minister David Cameron, who has pushed for even greater surveillance powers.
www.nytimes.com/2015/03/23/opinion/britains-surveillance-state.html?_r=0
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Surveillance State 29 Mar 2015 07:59 #16

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Surveillance State 30 Mar 2015 07:31 #17

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Surveillance State 29 Apr 2015 08:17 #18

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Surveillance State 29 Apr 2015 09:30 #19

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12 consecutive posts?
To understand who rules over you look to whom you tube can't criticise

The media isn't there to cover the news
It's there to cover the news up

All establishment lies pass through three stages
First, they are accepted as being self evident
Second, they are exposed by diligent research
Third, they are enforced

"Communism is the bloodiest, most difficult and the most terrible way from capitalism to capitalism" from Under the Sign of the Scorpion by Juri Lina
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Surveillance State 30 Apr 2015 07:35 #20

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