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TOPIC: Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown

Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 10 Dec 2018 11:03 #1

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Mardale Green

The Jewel in A Lost Crown



The picture below sets the scene of Mardale Green, Taken during the drought of 1984 looking south with Chapel Bridge on the centre right and the ruins of Goosemire farm bottom left, the lane in the middle of the picture crosses Arnold bridge, eventually rejoining the main road, which crosses the bridge and Mardale beck, seen here just along the right hand side of the picture; It also shows the huge scar at the edges of the reservoir where the level reaches at high water, and centre left shows the ruins of Goosemire Farm.


What the valley looked like before taken from the same spot.



Goosemire Before the flood below, with Chapel Hill Farm across on the right



The year was 1919 and sad news reaches the folk of Mardale Green, they awoke to learn that the Manchester Water Corporation had just secured the long awaited Haweswater Act, a compulsory purchase agreement of the day, which granted them permission to build a dam and drown one of Lakeland's Jewels in its crown.
Since the day in 1208, when Sir Hugh Holme arrived to found the first dwelling there, time had been kind to Mardale, that was until this terrific blow was unleashed, for hundreds of years the green has stood at the head of the valley, its once fine white washed farm houses dotted the breathtaking landscape, now they arrive with pick, crane and dynamite to change things forever.

The act read that the farmers must abandon their homes together with hundreds of acres of land, their cattle and sheep must be sold off, unless a suitable alternative could be found. Once the plug was set, the waters will rise to cover the farms, schools and church, where will the people go, How do they feel, their last farewells will be heart breaking and tragic, but they will have to be done.

The Kitchen family have lived and farmed the Measand area for nigh on ninety years, Tom the head of the family now an old man of seventy, a solitary figure tall and thin, making his way home from tending his flock on the fell side, he was a man of very few words, as men so often are who live their lives in solitary places, in his silence is a depth of feeling, "that no words could express", it is the silence of a man resigned to fate, a man who knows quite well, "there could never be any other place".




Some of the villagers say he will retire, but still he says nothing, and as yet, he has made no effort to find, "that other place", perhaps he is thinking that a miracle might happen and he would not have to leave his home and way of life at all.

He will however talk freely about the effect the flooding will have upon his valley, he says "When the waters come up, Mardale will be ruined as a beauty spot," The soft green of hedge and meadow will be gone leaving only the harsh fells for company".

Of his twelve sons and daughters, six still live at home, Lennox the oldest son is married with two boys, and lives in the family cottage less than a hundred yards away.
We still don't know where we are all going to go, "says Doris" and we still haven't found anywhere else to go as yet, the officials from the corporation are coming to see father, he is hoping that they will let us stay on for another five years or so.
Tom's daughter, Doris keeps house for her father and four unmarried brothers, sisters Maria and Rosemary are both married and live in nearby Bampton and another brother Bernard is married and lives at Appleby.
Mrs Kitchen died about sixteen years ago leaving a young girl of six months old, who went to live with an aunt in Grassmere and was sent to school in Ambleside.
A little further up Measand stands the small holding of Colby where Tom's sister once lived, she is also tall and thin like him, and was then the oldest surviving member of the family, before the evacuation.
A mile and a half further along the valley you come to Flake Howe farm where Mr and Mrs Lancaster lived with their twin girls and three other children, Mrs Lancaster was born on the farm, which belonged to her father, who retired and went to live in Askham, only to die there several months later.
Like everyone else the Lancaster's were finding it extremely hard securing another place that catered for sheep only, of which they had about a thousand.
In a good season our farms were very profitable, we didn't grow any crops like Mr Kitchen did, there are plenty of arable farms to be had, but not that many that cater for sheep.

So far only the Bell's of Grove Brae have secured another farm, in nearby Heltondale nine miles away, Tom left in February to go and get it in working order, until then Edith and her young one's will have to manage alone, the Bell's were allowed one year's rent by compensation, not a lot, even in those days, when you take into account there were two places to run until the move actually happened.





The head of the valley today



There is lots more to come in this series of Mardale Green, pictures of every household and the people who resided in the valley, including the building of the dam itself, a story that took me 28 years to collect, so stay tuned for lots more stories to follow.
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Last Edit: 10 Dec 2018 11:16 by Gan Anim.
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Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 10 Dec 2018 12:39 #2

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The Kings of Mardale Green



Hidden away in the far North Eastern corner of Westmoreland now Cumbria is the five mile long secluded valley of Mardale, a rugged and remote place with mountains on every side, it once offered the perfect hiding place for a family on the run.

One such band was, Hugh Parker Holme and his family, originally a native of Stockholm Sweden, and a knight of the realm who once made his living from war, He entered early Britain within the armies of William the 1st, and for his troubles he was rewarded with a large estate in Yorkshire.

The year was 1209, and Hugh was thought to be involved within the Canterbury Conspiracy, a plot of their day to oust the then King John of England, this incurred the displeasure of John, who confiscated their estate in Yorkshire and had them driven out of their home, now fearing for their lives, they swiftly headed north, making for safety in Scotland, which was neutral at the time.

Their march was long and weary, crossing rivers mountain and dale, avoiding all the major routes they managed to remain hidden from view, Hugh sensed they were nearing their goal, but with their last few supplies running desperately low, and night time approaching, they stopped to rest and gather their strength, for the mountains ahead would test them in the days ahead, whilst sitting in a circle with their backs towards each other, looking up they saw the last few streams of daylight breaking through gaps in the blackening skies, suddenly one of Hugh's sons noticed a light flickering far below them in the distance.

As he spoke, the heavens opened, the light now was fading fast, so they decided to take shelter in a tiny cave they found earlier that evening, little did they know it, but this place was to serve them well in the days ahead, unknown to them they were high upon Rough Crag, in the most inaccessible part of Riggindale (The cave survives to this day and is marked upon modern maps as Hugh's Cave), with the Scottish border a short distance away, they closed their eyes and drifted off into a deep sleep.

As daylight broke, the rain and hail still pounded the ridge, so they waited until the worst of the weather abated, by now what little supplies they had were gone, and leaving his family behind for the first time since they set out, Hugh went down into the valley alone, to seek new supplies and to check if any news of the plot had reached this place, Hugh would make the trip from cave to green many times and as luck would have it, they heard news of King John's demise, with him safely in the ground changed everything, so making for neutrality and safety in Scotland was now not so important, they decided to stay a while longer.

The days turned into weeks and the months past so fast, that any fears they had, ebbed slowly away, by now they had left the safety of the cave and ventured down into the valley, where a kind old man, who was getting on in years and needing the care of others, took them in, when the old man passed away, Hugh bought his lands and set too at building his own home, high upon the Rigg, Hugh's young family added a much needed boost toward village life, the locals were very forthcoming and welcomed them with open arms.


Hugh's dwelling at Bowderthwaite, built using the dry stone and dung method, with its crow stepped roof and fine Lakeland blue slate roof.


In the years to come, Hugh gained the peoples trust, mainly by the doing of good, they valued his thoughts and eventually involved him within their politics, so much so, that they eventually awarded him with the title, The King of Mardale.

the centuries that followed, every 1st male of the family line, were dubbed the King, the last male passed away in 1885 with Hugh Parker Holme, his memorial can still be seen in the new church yard, just up the road from the old church in Shap village, the very last line of the family ended with one Mary Elizabeth Holme who died in 1915 at the ripe old age of 90.






In 1990 news of a pair of Golden eagles had returned to Riggindale (Above) after an absence of nearly 160 years, they too made their eyrie only a short distance from where Hugh and his family laid up on that wet Lakeland night, the Eagles were last seen together in 2000, since then the female bird has not, until then we will hope and wait their return.




Looking West off of the main valley of Mardale and up into Riggindale, the cave marked on older OS maps lies on the Southern slopes near the head of this inlet.


Today he is the King of the valley.
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Last Edit: 10 Dec 2018 15:09 by Gan Anim.
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Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 10 Dec 2018 14:33 #3

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Grove Brae Farm



The Fine hotel of the Dun Bull Inn in the foreground, more in this next; and the outbuildings of Grove Brae on the far right of shot.Tom and Edith Bell farmed Grove Brae for over twenty years, the house was not modern in any way, it had an outside privy, the land was mainly of rock and fell, but five healthy children were raised within its walls.



Miss Betty Bell below bringing in the geese for the night.




Above is Mrs. Edith Bell standing in the kitchen doorway with her friendly hound she has just let out for his morning stroll, notice the dogs paw prints all over the flags in front of the door, many farms and dwellings kept a hound or two towards the local hunt which was one of many in Lakeland which was done on foot without horses.


Here is Edith again walking back towards the house with the mornings milk to set about making some butter, the geese leading the abound and following here back for their breakfast.

As the valley was being taken over by the Manchester Water Corporation they had to build a better road on the other side of the valley seen here under construction, Ediths husband Tom can be seen a little further down the road with his horses, and below with their youngest daughter Lucy Bell and the village posty Mr Fisher.




Above showing the remains of Grove Brae farm, the small green patch of grass just above the tree in the middle of the piles of stones is the same spot where Edith is standing with her geese. This is one of the first areas to show once the water level falls 20 feet below the top of the dam, it is showing most years but the rest does not show until the level is down sixty feet or more.

See the area by dron here, from the very beginning of the video, the road that leads down into the water is where the old pram in next to the stone wall.



Lots more to follow, with more stories of the people themselves.
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Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 17 Dec 2018 11:24 #4

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Brackenhowe Farm



Tucked away at the very end of the valley was Brakenthwaite Farm, this is one of the first dwelling to show when the water level drops, the farm was used as an early lodging house for some of the first dam workers who arrived in the valley around 1930, and towards the end of the dam completion the Dun Bull Inn and hotel used it as a subsiduary farm and bed and breakfast for the overspill for visitors which were plentiful towards the end of the Dam Project, by people who wanted to stay in the area before the rising waters reach and covered it, when the water did reach the area it was not until 1973 before it was seen again.




The picture above shows the ruins during the drought of 1984 showing the same area looking down away in the opposite direction to the new road on the other side of the valley, the Royal Engineers used many of the dwellings for demolition practice, at the position along the valley its remains are only 12 feet below the reservoirs top level on the Western side of the valley.





Here we have the floor plan of the main dwelling, the small roundcompartment near the right hand side was an old built in stone oven and at the back of the house was an external spiral staircase to the upper floor, it was one of the best traditional longhouse cottages in Lakeland, surrounded by trees this small holding with adjoined barn could support a small family independantly of the system of the day.
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Last Edit: 17 Dec 2018 17:43 by Gan Anim.
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Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 17 Dec 2018 12:11 #5

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Flakehowe Farm






The picture above shows the morning of Flakehowe farm sale and a sad day for Tom Edmondson and his family, who farmed here for over thirty years, most of the land was of little use, but it did have a small amount of the best land along the valley bottom towards the original lake of High Water.

The farm would carry on for a few years after this, with Mr Jack Lancaster, who married John's daughter, then Maggie Edmondson, and would run things right up until the flooding, below is a true plan of the dwelling, notice the round bread oven in the top right hand corner of the kitchen, several other houses in the valley had similar ovens, and outer walled spiral stair cases, which were not heated saving valuable energy during the winter months.




Jack seen in his best outside the old grammar school.





The Lancaster children with the twin girls Maggie and Marion either side of centre, and their brothers, Alexander, Jack and Raymond, mother Maggie Lancaster can be seen behind to the left over the stone wall sowing corn by hand, Jack was also responsible for the vallies fishing permits and was also the church warden for many years.
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Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 17 Dec 2018 16:50 #6

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The Dun BullHotel




Above showing the rear east view of the Dun Bull taken in 1921, most views of this building were taken from the opposite angle facing the front door, the farm which came attached can be seen on the right of the complex, the middle section was added during the rein of John Lamley landlord at the time of this picture, also the rear of the Holme residence can be seen, with its off shooting annex's at its rear, in the picture below. Just above the rooftop you can see the while posts of the new road on which visitors travel to the head of the valley today.




Above shows the Dun Bull Hotel with the tennis court opposite, Mr Bob Daffurn ran the Hotel together with the attached farm and a thousand sheep, which provided an extra income when times were slow during the winter months, the Hotel and adjoining property, once the dwelling of the Holmes family had sixteen bedrooms, three kitchens, two bars, three servants quarters, three WC's, in all a very nice property indeed, which would command a heafty price on the property markets today.




Showing the rear of the property and the old watering hole as it was with its white washed walls.




Above shows the Dun Bull ruins in the drought of 1976 with the tennis court still visible on the opposite side of the old Mardale road running across the bottom of shot.



A winter scene in the winter of 1927, at almost 760 feet above sea level the winters here came earlier and stayed longer, but these old Lakeland buildings with their three foot thick walls and strong one inch thick natural stone slate roofs were built to conquor whatever the elements could thrown at them.




The Dun Bull stood on a site where other inns had before it for over 500 years, it also stood on a point where several main by ways converged and was particularly famous throughout eastern Lakeland as a favourite amongst ramblers and climbers alike who often visited the valley during the summer months, the Mardale hunt was a very busy time for Bob Daffurn seen here below in the centre surrounded by his staff and standing in the middle of the Mardale Hunt Hounds and the hunt master to his left.



There were two fully equipped kitchens going non stop during the height of the season: Gentleman would arrive on Friday morning and some would lodge until Tuesday, we had them sleeping in the windows sill he said, on the floor on rugs, even in the bathroom and in the stables, anywhere we could get them bedded down, we only had sixteen rooms to let, which would all be fully booked up by lunch time.



On Friday night we would get to bed around 2.0 clock and Saturday and Sunday, we wouldn't get to bed at all, it was quite a different matter during the winter months though, things were so tight, we would have to put a penny or two into the till and wouldn't turn the tap unless we wanted a drink ourselves, thanks for the farm and the 1000 sheep to tide us by.



The picture above shows one of the largest shepherds meetings in 1908 at the hight of it prowess, here the whole community turned out and many a small fortune was made and paid by all, and many prized tups were sent to the far corners of Northern Britain, unknown to them the annals of power were already planning the demise of one of Lakelands jewels in its crown, the whole valley would be sold by the Lowther family estate for the sun of one hundred and seventy thousand pounds, a small fortune in their day, but would hardly by a semi detached three bedroon dwelling today.



Pictured above shows one of the original pint pots from the old Dun Bull itself, In 1995 I have the great pleasure to interview the Lady who is holding up the mug whose husband was one of the very last children to be blessed in the old Trinity Church shortly before it wa taken down and rebuilt again including the original stained glass windows as part of the new take off tower, which lies about half way along the Eastern side of the lake, when filled up to the small outside rim at the top, it hold exactly one pint, this lady is still alive today 2018, one of the very last survivors of the valley before the plug was set and the old valley its road and buildings were gone beneth dark waters.
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Last Edit: 17 Dec 2018 17:44 by Gan Anim.
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Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 17 Dec 2018 17:35 #7

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Mardale Valley Index


A. Brackenhowe Farm

B. Dunn Bull Hotel

C. Grove Brae Farm

D. Goosemire Farm

E. Holy Trinity Church

F. Chapel Hill Farm

G. Riggindale Farm

H. Flake Howe Farm

I. Parsonage

J. High Whelter Farm

K. Low Whelter Farm

L. Public School

M. Rowan Park Farm

N. Sand Hill Farm

O. Measand Hall Farm

P. Measand High School

Q. Measand Hall House Farm

R. Colby Dwelling

S. Boat House
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Last Edit: 17 Dec 2018 17:47 by Gan Anim.
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Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 17 Dec 2018 18:28 #8

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Walmgate Head House



It was a bright cold Tuesday morning in February 19th 1895, about a mile up the valley from Bampton village, and a five minute walk from the lake at Haweswater, Mr. C. Wilson and his family who were from Manchester, were just rising from a peaceful nights sleep at Walmgate Head..

The house was a fine example of Victorian craftsmanship with many large rooms, some containing fine oak panelling and furniture of costly character, in the great hall were three magnificent carved oak sideboards with matching tables and chairs and a good deal of fine paintings.

Mr. Wilson only occupied the house for about three months in any given year from around June to September, leaving it for the rest of the year in the capable hands of a life long friend, and servant, Mrs Dinah Martindale.

On the Monday morning the day before Mr. Wilson noticed that Dinah was not looking as well as usual, somewhat feeble in her appearance, so he asked for her daughter-in-law to call in and make sure she was feeling all right.
The following day Dinah seemed to be in much better fettle, and with this news, soon after nine in the morning Mr. Wilson left for the day on business.
At around seven-o-clock the same evening a young man called Jonathon Dargue, who was then living with his parents who farmed at Thornthwaite Hall was walking back home from a days walling alongside the Haweswater beck.
As he approached the gateway to Thornthwaite Hall, which stands almost directly opposite the kitchen window, then the outer walls of Walmgate sat right up to the road side.

He noticed Mrs. Martindale her arms outstretched peacefully warming herself by the kitchen fire, normally he wouldn’t be able to see through the window, because the kitchen shutters by this time of an evening would be closed. For the night, anyway things seemed normal, and so as not to disturb her he walked quietly past.
Looking back over his shoulder, he also noticed a candle light coming from her living quarters and guessed she was about to retire for the evening, and walked off home for his supper, what happened between now and 8-30, no one really knows.

At 8-30 the same evening, Mr. Joseph Noble, a farmer residing at Littlewater and returning from Bampton, noticed a glare in the distant sky, just like that seen in the skies on November the fifth, which looked to be coming from the direction of Thornthwaite Mill.

Knowing it was a building on fire, he hurried back to his father’s residence at Eastward and got the assistance of his brothers and two other men, they soon donned their boots and were out and running in less than two minutes.

They all rushed off in the direction of the mill, but when they rounded the corner opposite Bull Cop field, they soon realised it was not the mill, but the large house at Walmgate head that was ablaze, it did not take long for them to valuate that any efforts in tackling the fire now, would be all but fruitless.
As they approached the building the main roof timbers on the older part of the house crashed in over and huge flames rose hundreds of feet into the night sky.

Mr Noble went down to Thornthwaite hall to get help there, shortly after the brothers heard cries coming from the barn, which they knew to hold around ten of their prised animals and the winters supply of hay and straw, and quickly made their release, the animals were found to be in good shape, even after being in such warm surroundings.

One brother entered the lower part of the house by smashing in a side window, only to find his way cut off by the flames, there was no way into the kitchen area where Mrs Martindale was seen earlier, once they had found a way inside, they witnessed the main hall and staircase ablaze, time was off the essence because their only route to the upper apartments would be cut off for good.

Then one man risking his life, ran up the burning staircase and quickly reached the living quarters, were Mrs Martindale was thought to be, only to be beaten back by a blast of heat and flames as he opened the door, he had a good look through the flames but could not see anyone in there, as this was taking place, Mr Wilson arrived and heard about the plight of Mrs Martindale, so he shouted for the man to come down immediately, for he did not want to loose anyone else to the fire.

As the search downstairs gathered pace they managed to remove a number of items, which included the grand piano, three tables and a prised mahogany table and many small items by throwing them out through the windows.

By now news of the fire had reached the village, Rev G.E. F. Day rang the church bell to attract others attention,

and soon there were hundreds of people watching the fire ripping through the house, no real attempt was made at tackling the fire, because all the streams and water troughs were frozen solid, no hoses could be found , and the only water tender was five miles away in Shap, and by midnight the fire had about burnt itself out.

In a note read later, a local cabinet maker said, all the main bedrooms in the new section of the house were panelled out with the finest south American redwood, this timber contains a high resin content, which contributed to the fires speedy route throughout this area of the building.

A visit to the site the next day gave a sad sight, only the huge walls were left standing, not one particle of wood was left, only tiny fragments of the porch section were visible.

Amongst the debris were twisted and bent brass bedsteads, the remains of several prised long case clock movements, lots of glass and porcelain pieces, melted and smashed beyond all recognition.

A few smaller inexpensive prints were saved, but the larger more valuable paintings and personal embroideries, all went up in the flames with everything else, a great loss costing well over £700.00 pounds for the value of the house, £300.00 of furniture and £40.00 of hay belonging to Mr Noble.


Measand Grammar School





Measand school or Grammar school, seen above in its original position, there was just enough room for about a dozen or so pupils to sit and study, pictured above left are, 3 of 12 children Marie, Rosemary and Albert from the Kitchen family.

The Kitchen family farmed in the valley for several generations, Large families were common in the Victorian era, below are just a few of the know names used by their parents.



Ada Jane Marie

Janet Augusta Louisa

Gladys Wasteline Lennox

Florence Winifred Hunter

Thomas Harrisson Bousfield

William Thereodore Barren

Lowther Lonsdale Liddle

Brunskill Hair Bland

Hugh Harvey Hayton

Arthur Duncan Hazel

Selena Rose Parker

Noble Boustead Holme

Mabel Gertrude Wilson

Albert Ashington Donald Sykes

Elsie Violet Constance Fothergill May


The tiny building was loved so much by the locals, in 1937 they had it taken down stone by stone and rebuilt again at Walmgate Head.




The school house shortly after it was rebuilt upon the old site of Walmgate Head House, story above, below is the building today after modern alterations.


Below showing the original benefactors plaque.

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Last Edit: 18 Dec 2018 00:22 by Gan Anim.
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Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 18 Dec 2018 00:05 #9

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Mardale Farmer Goes Missing





Above is the area of the valley and the best pastures and ploughing land, a once proud parkland which supported many different grains.



Harvest time in Mardale.


Almost a hundred years ago of the fifth of June 1933 a well known Mardalian and respected local farmer went missing without a trace, this is the story as it was told by a close relative.
The man in question was Mr. William Martindale the Current tennant of Flake Howe farm Mardale, he was a well to do farmer of middle age, well liked and widely known, his family life was a happy one, with an affectionate wife and four loving children of which there were three young boys and a baby daughter.
He took what money he had in the family coffers which come to around fifty pounds, and the early one morning simply mounted his horse and rode away, never to be seen again.
His steed was found in a few days later booked into a stable in the town of Kendal, to get there he might have taken one of several routes, 1. via Nan Bield Pass and down through Kentmere, 2. via Gatesgarth pass and along through Longsleddale, or 3. and the longest route via Bampton then Shap and over the fells which would take many hours and the most likely chance of being seen by somebody on the day.
If he was murdered soon after starting out, this would account for no one seeing him, then why would his killer take his horse to Kendal and book it into a stable for the night and pay the fee in advance to the owner who will undoubtedly meet hin face to face.

If he was murdered shortly after arriving at Kendal, why would that person take such a recognisable horse and sell it, he would be identifiable for sure, again if this was a pre-planned disappearance, what was that motive, and, again, why stable his horse instead of selling it?

Against the theory of a planned flight are the facts, that he loved his life in Mardale, and no preparations was in evidence and that he left his only substance of money and the comfort of existence behind him, taking with him such an amount of cash that might seem reasonable for any farmer of the day, who was likely to come across a good deal.

There are questions one would like to ask, what day was the horse stabled, at which hotel, who took charge of the horse when it was handed over, this person must have seen him or his killer, face to face.
By now most of the people around in those days have passed away, there might be some relatives left around today, who might have specific information to help solve this old case, the old notes for the enquiry might still be in existence today, they would most definitely make very interesting reading, for this still unsolved mystery.
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Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 18 Dec 2018 00:16 #10

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The Mardalian Lament


Taken looking down Arnold beck from the tiny packhorse bridge, below.





The Farmsteads are empty their roof-trees all Gone

The strong hardy dales men have left Yan by Yan

There's now't left to show where their old dwellings stood

Save whitening on stone deep 'neath the flood

Dear were its forests where we wandered so free

Or rested a while on some ald fallen tree

Loved were t'ald meadows leading down to the shore

No fair maid of Mardale will tread there no more

Its quaint larle church nestling under t'ald yews

Was plundered of alter pulpit and pews

The sacred dead laid to rest there for aye

Will hear the last triumph some place far away

The Dun Bull has gone no more shall we rest there

Its larders are empty its cupboards are bare

The rooms where we revelled for ever are lost

No more shall we feast there recking the cost

So Mardale farewell for those strangers have robbed thee

Of all that was dear to my comrades and me

Of forest and church and Dun Bull we're bereft

High Whelter's gaunt gables are all that is left

When't watter's fall low, once again thou shall see

The true road of Mardale winding down'the valley.
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Last Edit: 18 Dec 2018 00:20 by Gan Anim.
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Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 18 Dec 2018 13:16 #11

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From Chapel Bridge to Riggindale Bridge





Standing by the quiet waters of Mardale Beck is Chapel Bridge with Wood Howe behind in the distance and Chapel Hill Farm and the 500 year old yew trees of Holy Trinity Church and grounds to the right.



From Chapel Bridge the road climbs some 35 feet onto Chapel Hill and the main junction to the farm, church and old valley dirt road beyond, just to the right of the old car the exhumation barrier within the church grounds can be seen, a post and hessian barrier has been placed while the work continues.






The picture above was taken standing within the boundaries of Holy Trinity Church, the road here forks left up into Chapel Hill farm, this was once an impressive dwelling with seven bedrooms, 2 reception rooms, 2 dining rooms and two kitchens, many families lived here over the years, the Baileys, Hudson's, Simpson's and the Holmes all lived here.

Mr. Tom Bell and and his wife Edith, formerly Hindmarch once rented the left hand side upper and lower rooms in the big house for ten shillings a week, while he worked the horses for Tom Bell at Grove Brae Farm, and Tom Bell Himself once worked here at Chapel Hill, before he got the sack for letting his dog sook the hens eggs from their nests, a real expert was Moss the sheepdog at emptying the contents and leaving the shells intact.


Notice at this point along the old road where the walls were uncovered for the first time in 1995, still is original condition and out of the reach of the visitors, everywhere else the walls have been removed due to souvenir hunters, especially at Chapel Bridge that no longer has its retaining walls after earlier drought had uncovered it, see picture below taken in 1976.




Here we now meet the waters at Riggindale Beck, this was a fully rivetted and wrought iron construction built and errected in 1899 by Stalker Bros of nearby Penrith, it was only one of a few structures that survive the flood by being re-errected over the Sleddale beck in Wet Sleddale.



Below is the small hamlet of Riggindale Farm, this complex and its ruins can bee see on the Western shore of Mardale and the reservoir even when the lake is full, but now in ruins as its fate was the same xplosive end at the hands of The Royal Engineers.





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Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 20 Dec 2018 10:11 #12

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The Last Sermon at Holy Trinity


The last farewell service at Holy Trinity will long be remembered, years hence old men and women, now but larle en's will tell their children and grandchildren, how on the 18th of August 1935 they were part of the congregation that sad day.

The church held around 75 people, the lord mayor ,Alderman Woolam and the Lady Mayoress with a few others including Mrs Cormack who played the harmonium, secured the remaining seats.
The 61st Bishop of Carlisle, the right rev Herbert Williams pronounced the final blessing within its walls, it is said that over a thousand people gathered upon the hillside beside listening to the service via loud hailers fastened to the church tower, by a local radio expert from Penrith, many there having Mardalian connections or just a love of old places, the general atmosphere was reverential, for there was something very moving about the service, all be it a simple one.




Some of the throng seemed to think that the locals were unduly hasty at holding the farewell service now, for the rising waters would not flow over the site next week or next month, for the final position for the dam footing had not yet been thought upon.

The psalm's sung, were, I will lift up mine eyes into the hills and hymns included, O God Our Help in Ages Past, the Church's One Foundation and Bright Vision That Delighted, a line which summed up the marvellous beauty of the valley.



The Eastern end of the church on its heaven kissing hill with its only Stained galss window, the vedgetable garden of Chapel hill farm can be seen on the far right of the picture with its rows of potatoes, it was built upon an ancient Pagan shrine and instituted there by the Monks of Shap Abbey.


The saddest man amongst the crowd that day was former and last vicar or the parish, Rev Frederick H. J. Barham, who never actually received an official invitation to the service, came out of retirement and travelled north to be present, he donned his clerical garb, he did not go into the church, for the memories of the underhand treatment he received from the hands of the MCWW was too painful a memory to bare, instead he wandered amongst the crowd in his clerical garb talking to them, many of which had been in his old flock for more than twenty five years.




The voices of the great congregation rose high into the hills that day, if only those voices had been heard afar, then this most beautiful place might still be there for all to enjoy, here many hundred can be seen standing on the hill outside.

At the close of the service, the Bishop of Carlisle offered prayers for all the living descendants of the Holme family, See, (The Kings of Mardale), who had always known and loved this larle church.





Reverand Barham and the church's organ, the original Pulpit and much of the original woorwork can now be seen in a small chappel in nearby Borrowdale.




When the church was demolished the original windows and the best stonework was reused and now sits in the place where the draw of tower now sits as the water begins its 97 mile journey towards Manchester by gravity alone.




The picture above shows the navvies working on one of the draw off pipes where the draw off tower now sits.
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Mardale Green The Jewel in a Lost Crown 21 Dec 2018 18:02 #13

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The old lakes of Low and high water





Pictured above show the original Lakes of High and Low Water that went on to be covered over by the much higher level of the dam built renaming the lake Haweswater reservoir, the narrowing at the middle of the two half's was called the Straits, which was caused by the constant outfall from Measand beck, this area was known as Measand.


The bridge over Measand Beck with the roof of the Grammar School seen above.


On the opposite side of the lake is where the new service road runs, it can bee seen as a white scar under construction, the new level now rises towards and just under it, this puts the picture around the mid to late twenties, the southern end of the valley is still with meadow and the fine farm of Measand and it old hall below.







The remains of the best dwellings at Measand Hall below, after the Royal Engineers used it for demolition practice.





Another view of the valley before the dam work began, here we can see the same narrowing of the straits that almost cut the two lakes of low and high waters, the old road can be seen here beyond the old derelict building with its roof tiles recycled to another building in nearby Bampton Grange.



The last view of the old road before the dam cut off access to this side of the valley.
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