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TOPIC: The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity

The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 23 Oct 2013 22:33 #1

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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity



Gardening, growing food and wildlife conservation is good for our mental health and should be prescribed on the NHS, a leading charity has said.

Seven out of ten people with a mental health problem who took part in a programme of 'ecotherapy', funded by the charity Mind, reported "significant increases in wellbeing" and more than 250 of them were helped into full time employment, the charity said.

www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/the-good-life-is-good-for-mental-health-says-leading-charity-8897710.html
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 23 Oct 2013 22:42 #2

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From the same article......

"Last year a staggering fifty million antidepressant prescriptions were issued and currently one in five people with mental health problems have to wait up to a year to access talking treatments," he said. "When growing numbers of people are affected by mental health problems each year and they're telling us that they want more options than drugs, now is the time for commissioners across health, social care and public health to take a fresh look at this evidence and realise the long-term benefits that holistic treatments like ecotherapy can deliver."
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 00:01 #3

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It's pretty evident that medication (or sectioning) does not help with mental issues. Depression, for example, is NOT relieved by pills and potions, and often the talking therapies are as bad if not worse (putting the person through what "ails" them again and again and so keeping it well and thriving). How someone is supposed to get better when all that has been done is the affecting of their mental abilities by drugging them up or getting them to repeat endlessly how horrible it all is can work, I dunno. :conf: The mental health "therapies" seem not to want to cure it but rather to simply shut it up and keep it quiet.

But there are new and upcoming methods of helping people to take CONTROL of their depression. For example, the Uncommon Knowledge Depression Learning Path, linked below (it can be worked through on line - you do not have to give your email addy unless you want it sent to you in piecemeal). It takes the time to actually TEACH people what depression actually is (yes, I know we all think we know what it is, but....) and to show its know cycle. Sometimes, that's all it takes. It really is worth the time it takes to read through it.

www.clinical-depression.co.uk/depression-learning-path/

There are other such courses being worked on that involve the person being able to intervene in their illness and to spot the circumstances or cycles that are feeding it. If those things aren't recognised, dealt with and changed, what can a pill or potion do?

:conf:
"...Wyrde saves oft the man undoomed
if he undaunted be....". (Beowulf).

"The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths... Beautiful people do not just happen". (Elisabeth Kubler-Ross).


:cavalier
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 00:08 #4

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I will have a good look at that later. I'm in a bit of a funk at the mo and I'm trying everything I possibly can to lift myself out of it.

Coming on here helps. :yup:
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 00:13 #5

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I wrote the following for artists, but there is a more general significance to it that I think fits on this thread,
Fat lazy and depressed, good move
Artist do you want to fit in?
You’re fat, lazy and depressed. So you should be! It is not you who are sick it is society. You’re fat because you’re building up reserves ready for a fight. You’re lazy because what is the point of producing art for some oligarch to put on his wall so he can flaunt possessions to his minions. Why would that motivate you to produce art? You’re depressed because this society is rotting and smells of corruption. You’re depression is a natural response to the state you find yourself in. The leaders of this society use their media to try to convince you, the individual that everything wrong is your fault, but if you were to act as they want, you wouldn’t be depressed. However when you have squeezed yourself into a round hole, you have come out in an even worse state. If someone’s not depressed they haven’t even realized there is a problem. To not realise there is a problem means that person is not observant. To not be observant is to not be an artist.
Depression is not an aliment to be cured; it is a way of seeing.
Even the sciences are now starting to understand this.
New Scientist: Date- 28th November 2009. Page- 14. Quote-
The world looks different if you are depressed
DEPRESSION really does change the way you see the world. People with the condition find it easy to interpret large images or scenes, but struggle to "spot the difference" in fine detail. The finding hints at visual training as a possible treatment.
Depressed people have a shortage of a neurotransmitter called GABA; this has also been linked to a visual skill called spatial suppression, which helps us suppress details surrounding the object our eyes are focused on ¬enabling us to pick out a snake in fallen leaves, for instance.
Now Julie Golomb and colleagues at Yale University are trying to link this ability with major depressive disorder (MOD). Golomb asked 32 people to watch a brief computer animation of white bars drifting over a grey and black background, and say which way they were moving.
A quicker response gave a higher score. Half of the group had good mental health, while the rest had recently recovered from depression. The latter were chosen so that medication would not interfere with the results, but Golomb thinks results from people with MOD would be similar because the condition is thought to have genetic factors.
When the image was large, the recovered volunteers found the task easier, which means they would do better in the forest scenario. But they performed less well than the other group when looking at a small image. "Their ability to discriminate fine details was impaired, which is the sort of perception that we tend to use
on a daily basis;' says Golomb Journal of Neuroscience, 001: 10.15 23/jneuroscl .100 3-09. 20
"Depression is often thought of as just a mood disorder," she says, "but it can impact upon eating, sleeping habits, and now we know it can even affect the way a person sees the world."
In a commentary on the study Pascal Wallisch and Romesh Kumbhani of New York University propose that perception trainer could offer a therapy for people with MOD. Golomb says this co possible, but it's unclear if trail would increase levels of GABA
Jessica Hamzelou
The article is written from the point of view that the depressed person is ill, but what if that is a wrong assumption?
Think about it; would it not be far more likely that depression is an evolved mode of thinking that we need if we are to tackle adverse circumstances. Imagine an animal that is in an environment where the amount of available food is there, but the environment is degrading. For instance a pond which is shrinking, it would concentrate enough fish in to an area that an animal could get its food relatively easily, but at some point the animal would have to move on. The animal might well be more than able to recognize the signs of the food which is present, but if it is to survive long term it is going to have to find a better environment rather than individual plants. So it would make sense that the animal adapts itself to viewing the big picture rather than fret about small details. Once the animal has understood its environment is becoming depleted wouldn’t it be the right course for it to indulge itself in overeating so that it has reserves ready for a trek to find a new environment. The animal would be foolish to leave an area which is sustaining it directly because there is no guarantee it will find new pasture, at the same time it should take some precautions. Given these circumstances the animal will naturally become lethargic, while it waits for the changes that will encourage it to act.
If the above is the case, you cannot put forward the view the individual animal is wrong in that it is showing it is well adapted to its environment. Your depression is not your fault you have done nothing wrong, you are adapting to your environment.
Think of someone like yourself working in a call centre, selling stuff to people who don’t want or need it. They would have to make empathetic connections with the buyers, so that the buyers would trust them enough to buy the items. In this arrangement, the seller has to deny its humanity with every sale, as the seller has to pretend it is sympathetic to the buyer, and yet cut its empathy if it is to pass of the merchandise. If the worker in the call centre is to retain it’s humanity it will either disconnect from the normal socialization, and see the buyer as prey to be fed upon, or will find it increasingly difficult to make calls.
A call centre which does not make calls will not make a profit. Management will use a number of techniques to make its workforce make the calls.
Normalization
Management will present to its workforce that it is normal to see the buyer as prey, as inferior. We are different from them, we are powerful they are weak. We have better minds. We are winners. Management will present to its workforce that the most sociopathic tendencies are good. Look after yourself only and you will get the rewards, the rewards are all that matters. Workers in these centers are often told to ‘focus on what you could have’, and discouraged from having personal relationships. The winner is the one with an expensive car, not the one with friends. You can buy the good life, you need money for the good life, you are a predator, and you have to take before someone else does. The prey will only waste the money; you need it to good things for yourself. The management show targets which any normal person could complete. The worker now sees the targets gradually rise, and is told to meet them, or become a looser. Is the worker a predator or a herd animal like the buyers? Are you one of them or one of us?
The choice is can the worker give up the job, and retain some humanity, or accept some people are to be treated as fodder for others? To reject the job would cause hardship, to keep the job means developing a hard skin.
There are those who are so enrapt in this process they won’t even recognize this is a problem. This is not like an old market where each store holder wants the customers to come to them rather than the other traders, the trader wants the goods to be good, so the customers will come again. No the system you are in deliberately produces items which are not useful, or don’t last, and forces people to buy and sell them even when it is against these peoples own best interests.
You may be able to sell the stuff, but you are intelligent enough to see this system you are in is degraded. It is therefore natural for you to act in the way you have evolved to act. You eat and slow down to put on fats, so you are ready for the oncoming journey, and you change your perception, to looking at the wider environment.
However, we live in a society that blames the individual for not fitting in, so because of the culture you come from, when it becomes obvious that you do not like the society you are in and you can feel physically it is time to act, you blame yourself,
‘I feel alienated, as though I don’t belong. I don’t want to be here any more. It’s as though I’m separated.’ You tell your doctor and he blames you for no longer fitting in and just as he has been trained, and if the therapist cannot talk you out of it they will medicate you until you don’t feel anymore.
Sweetness from the death of power.
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 00:31 #6

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pheony wrote:
I will have a good look at that later. I'm in a bit of a funk at the mo and I'm trying everything I possibly can to lift myself out of it.

Coming on here helps. :yup:

:hug:

I'll call you tomorrow evening, if that's okay?
"...Wyrde saves oft the man undoomed
if he undaunted be....". (Beowulf).

"The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths... Beautiful people do not just happen". (Elisabeth Kubler-Ross).


:cavalier
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 00:34 #7

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cantata wrote:
pheony wrote:
I will have a good look at that later. I'm in a bit of a funk at the mo and I'm trying everything I possibly can to lift myself out of it.

Coming on here helps. :yup:

:hug:

I'll call you tomorrow evening, if that's okay?

Yes, that would be lovely. :)
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 00:40 #8

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@ jonb. Hunz, I think you're predominantly right, as usual BUT there are some who are not designed to "see the world that way" but who find themselves trapped into having to see the world in a depressed way because of circumstances, etc. I can tumble headlong into depression every now and again - it's a long way down, I can tell you, and when I hit the deck I am rendered totally immobile. I can do NOTHING. I stop swimming. I won't write. I leave the horses out in the field. The dog will get a walk another day.

It's crippling and blinding and it is not my natural state. I can't find any way of making use of it, putting it to good effect, nothing. It's like dying but having to breathe on nonetheless. And I can't stand it. Now, luckily it doesn't happen that often, but when it does I actually NEED to get out of it, back to where I belong. I agree that there are some who just see the world in a naturally depressed way; and I agree that it is not an illness and is often a right response to a wrong system - and for those that can function in that way, all power to their elbows. But for me, I have to climb up the sides back to The Outside again.

:)
"...Wyrde saves oft the man undoomed
if he undaunted be....". (Beowulf).

"The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths... Beautiful people do not just happen". (Elisabeth Kubler-Ross).


:cavalier
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 00:43 #9

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The problem isn't peoples minds it's our environment and State violence against society. Too many people are willing to support the system for fear of losing what think they have. People don't seem to realise that they are living in a cage they can't see, but our minds know that cage exists and the sickness isn't restricted to the less fortunate in society. There's something seriously wrong when we can allow the unnecessary abuse of other species and their environments as the video below demonstrates. What we fail to realise is that the vast majority of people are treated in the same way and suffer the same mental anguish and distress. Through an accident of birth we have the privilege of living in bigger cages but the long term results are much the same.

"Whenever you're in conflict with someone, there is one factor that can make the difference between damaging your relationship and deepening it. That factor is attitude." William James
Last Edit: 24 Oct 2013 00:43 by Frog.
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 00:48 #10

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Yes, I know frog and I have no argument with that being true. But an individual cannot just say "I'm stepping out of the cage and not playing any part in this game". Or, not unless they are financially free, anyway. The majority of us are trapped by all the millions who can't get enough of the game and refuse to see the cages or change anything. And it's when you know how trapped you are until "the majority" decide to change things that depression can hit you over the head like a club.

But it can be dealt with. There's an inner control that can be developed, as the Uncommon Knowledge Learning Path discusses.
"...Wyrde saves oft the man undoomed
if he undaunted be....". (Beowulf).

"The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths... Beautiful people do not just happen". (Elisabeth Kubler-Ross).


:cavalier
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 00:58 #11

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pheony wrote:
I will have a good look at that later. I'm in a bit of a funk at the mo and I'm trying everything I possibly can to lift myself out of it.

Coming on here helps. :yup:

:hug:
The pen is mightier than the sword
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 01:47 #12

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Cantata, Yes you are right, I too have that propensity, i have fallen far. However In my enforced inactivity through Chronic Fatigue Syndrome that my other problems depression and dyslexia are not just a hindrance that the vulnerability for instance I have with my depression also has advantages. Yes down in the depths alone with the black dog there is no light, but sometimes I have been able to use it. I wonder if my ability to see outside of myself is wrapped up in my vulnerability to deep depression, that if one was to be lost the other would also go. I know it is not just about environment I have a weakness, but I have to say I have also got strength from it which I know seems a perverse thing to write, but there is a relationship between creativity and depression that I do not think has been explored.
One cannot be hurt if one does not feel, and I choose to be hurt because my need to feel is so much more important.
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 02:22 #13

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It's good to see you jonb and cantata talking about dealing with depression. I will sometimes feel down, but not depressed. Lately though because of a few people in my family being very ill...it all started becoming a bit too much for me to personally cope with. I knew a couple of days ago that if I didn't sort my head out and soon, that I was quite possibly going to get depressed. I was feeling numb, didn't want to talk to anyone, couldn't even think straight, I just wanted to sleep . I forced myself to start doing things...even posting on here was difficult for me to do until this evening. I am feeling a lot better now though. I do realise that if someone is very depressed that it's not so easy to start doing everyday things again and my heart goes out to them.
Last Edit: 24 Oct 2013 02:31 by pheony.
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 08:29 #14

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jonb wrote:
Cantata, Yes you are right, I too have that propensity, i have fallen far. However In my enforced inactivity through Chronic Fatigue Syndrome that my other problems depression and dyslexia are not just a hindrance that the vulnerability for instance I have with my depression also has advantages. Yes down in the depths alone with the black dog there is no light, but sometimes I have been able to use it. I wonder if my ability to see outside of myself is wrapped up in my vulnerability to deep depression, that if one was to be lost the other would also go. I know it is not just about environment I have a weakness, but I have to say I have also got strength from it which I know seems a perverse thing to write, but there is a relationship between creativity and depression that I do not think has been explored.
One cannot be hurt if one does not feel, and I choose to be hurt because my need to feel is so much more important.

:hug:

:)

I think depression is a positive in its time and place, jonb. In grief, or illness, or when life is tough and stressful and suchlike, people can block themselves or race around endlessly trying to repair that which cannot be repaired (and maybe should not be repaired) and I believe depression is an incredibly useful body-tool at such times. It is literally the body's/mind's way of knocking someone to the floor and MAKING them be still and take the rest they need.

It's when it goes on too long, or comes on "out of place", or won't go away or - as happens with me sometimes - is triggered by the stamp of past memories that current circumstances seem to be indicating are about to strike again, that's when I think it has no bodily/mind use and is a toxin to the system.

You do have an unusual slant on life - :D I think you should be writing Blott On The Landscape type books (I love Blott On The Landscape) - and it doesn't surprise me that you have the wit and swerve of mind to be able to make something of depression and its darknesses. Something actually worth having.

But for me it is a sense of having been completely, totally and eternally doomed in one fell swoop and, as Beowulf reminds me, I must get "undoomed" as soon as I can. :D

I'm afraid I'm a little bugga for "over feeling" as I lurch through life. I find it hard to let go of feelings too, so they can be "sparked" often at the drop of a hat. My losses, those gone, places I loved but haven't seen for a while - I can lurch into melancholia all too easily and there's an awful lot of strings and lassoes in there to keep me pinioned.

But the big dangers are when the Black Feeling is sparked and, like I say, for me that involves absolutely no feeling whatsoever, at all. When I say it's like being dead but still breathing, I mean even physically - I have to be told by someone if I've burnt myself cooking or scratched my skin out walking the dog. All feeling is gone. And all sense. So there's my creativity stuffed! :D

But if a way could be shown to put those black days to use..... Wow! What a gift that would be. :thumbup:
"...Wyrde saves oft the man undoomed
if he undaunted be....". (Beowulf).

"The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths... Beautiful people do not just happen". (Elisabeth Kubler-Ross).


:cavalier
Last Edit: 24 Oct 2013 08:37 by cantata.
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 10:32 #15

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By the way, I just want to say one word to you all......... HORSES. :D

Yes, little old hairy legged horses. :D People nowadays go on about how swimming with dolphins has been shown to lift depression in people - and I believe that is so, for those who can afford to go off and swim with them. BUT horses do exactly the same thing and always have. It's why people end up so attached and devoted to the hairy blighters. They somehow "transfer" strength and ability to the human. You come away from them feeling.... better. It's hard to describe. But they are very, very, very healing; and very good at showing where The Self needs tempering or developing and HOW that can be done.

Really, HORSES. :D
"...Wyrde saves oft the man undoomed
if he undaunted be....". (Beowulf).

"The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths... Beautiful people do not just happen". (Elisabeth Kubler-Ross).


:cavalier
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 11:02 #16

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& DOGS cantata....don't be forgetting DOGS.... :D

Seriously, the unconditional & uncomplicated love you get from a dog can be very helpful when a person is going through a bad patch. :)
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 16:09 #17

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Yes, of course, dogs too, DG. Actually, just all animals really. But there is something different about a horse. Try it one day. :)
"...Wyrde saves oft the man undoomed
if he undaunted be....". (Beowulf).

"The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths... Beautiful people do not just happen". (Elisabeth Kubler-Ross).


:cavalier
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 17:40 #18

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cantata wrote:
But there is something different about a horse. Try it one day. :)
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 17:55 #19

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@ cantata...I'm reading the link that you posted. Many things that I have read so far, have struck a chord with me. One of them being.....
"Events can be seen to be a trigger for depression, but depression is not caused by what happens to us in life (although every one needs a break sometimes). It's about how we respond and make sense of events.

Depression relies how we explain things to ourselves

Much of clinical depression is about how we interpret reality. And when we start to develop depression symptoms, a depressive thinking style can seem impossible to break.

By understanding depressive thinking styles, we can begin to see how they form a pattern of thinking, a cycle of depression, that creates a downward spin and so continues to fuel the depression."

I completed some of the online tests and score high.....Depression.

Perhaps I should stop fooling myself and admit that I sometimes suffer from mild depression, but I'm lucky enough to be able to get myself out of it before I sink into a black hole.

:)
Last Edit: 24 Oct 2013 18:06 by diamondgeezer.
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The good life is good for mental health, says leading charity 24 Oct 2013 17:58 #20

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jonb wrote:
cantata wrote:
But there is something different about a horse. Try it one day. :)

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOoooooooooooooooooooooooo. :toetap:
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