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TOPIC: Sleep

Sleep 31 Oct 2013 11:35 #1

  • diamondgeezer
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How do you sleep? Do you get 'quality' sleep?

Interesting facts regarding the effects of sleep/lack of sleep on a persons health & well being in this link..

www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/excessive-sleepiness-10/10-results-sleep-loss
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Sleep 31 Oct 2013 14:22 #2

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New study to be added to that
Lack of sleep may increase Alzheimer's risk
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/267710.php
A new study suggests that reduced sleep and poor sleep quality may be linked to increased build-up of beta-amyloid plaques in the brains of older adults - a sign of Alzheimer's disease. This is according to a study published in the journal JAMA Neurology.
Researchers from The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Health say that previous research has linked disturbed sleep to cognitive impairment in older individuals.
They note that those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been shown to spend more time awake and have higher levels of fragmented sleep, compared with those who do not have the disorder.
Sleep patterns have previously been linked to beta-amyloid plaques. Research has indicated that changes in beta-amyloid levels may be regulated by sleep-wake patterns, the researchers say.
Therefore, they wanted to determine whether there is a link between beta-amyloid deposition and sleep variables within community-dwelling older adults.
The research team analyzed data from 70 adults with a mean age of 76 years, taken from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. All participants were free of any form of dementia.
The participants were required to self-report their sleep patterns, disclosing the mean hours of sleep they had each night, how often they woke throughout the night, whether they had trouble falling asleep and whether they woke earlier than planned.
Their beta-amyloid deposition in the brain was measured using various brain imaging techniques.
The above study may also a strong pointer to why sleep is necessary for our proper functioning.


It is common with CFS which I have, that sleep patterns become very erratic. And I have seen in myself how lack of sleep or poor quality sleep is affecting me very adversely in many ways.
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Sleep 31 Oct 2013 17:44 #3

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I also have erratic sleep patterns jonb, have had for a very long time. Insomnia.....early waking, etc. & yes, I am noticing adverse effects because of it too, much more now than when I was younger.

I used to think it was mainly down to my dodgy lifestyle, but now I'm not so sure that that is the real cause.
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Sleep 31 Oct 2013 18:06 #4

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I'm getting hardly any sleep at the moment. A couple of hours, wake up, go back to sleep, wake up.........

I have noticed that as I'm about to drop off..I'm forcing myself to stay awake by watching something ..I've been watching 'Jerseylicious' :umm: and loving it. :D

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Sleep 31 Oct 2013 18:38 #5

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pheony wrote:
I'm getting hardly any sleep at the moment. A couple of hours, wake up, go back to sleep, wake up.........

It's horrible isn't it. Because when that happens, you're not getting proper 'deep sleep'....rem sleep.

And these studies are now showing that broken sleep over a long period of time is really detrimental to our wellbeing in so many serious ways.
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Sleep 31 Oct 2013 19:51 #6

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diamondgeezer wrote:
pheony wrote:
I'm getting hardly any sleep at the moment. A couple of hours, wake up, go back to sleep, wake up.........

It's horrible isn't it. Because when that happens, you're not getting proper 'deep sleep'....rem sleep.

And these studies are now showing that broken sleep over a long period of time is really detrimental to our wellbeing in so many serious ways.

Yes, it's a bloody pain. Stringing a sentence together, let alone writing it down, is not the easiest of things when you are sleep deprived.

www.nhs.uk/Livewell/tiredness-and-fatigue/Pages/lack-of-sleep-health-risks.aspx
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Sleep 31 Oct 2013 20:29 #7

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Over time, lack of sleep and sleep disorders can contribute to the symptoms of depression. In a 2005 Sleep in America poll, people who were diagnosed with depression or anxiety were more likely to sleep less than six hours at night.

The most common sleep disorder, insomnia, has the strongest link to depression. In a 2007 study of 10,000 people, those with insomnia were five times as likely to develop depression as those without. In fact, insomnia is often one of the first symptoms of depression.

Insomnia and depression feed on each other. Sleep loss often aggravates the symptoms of depression, and depression can make it more difficult to fall asleep. On the positive side, treating sleep problems can help depression and its symptoms, and vice versa.

^ From the link in my op.

That resonates with me.
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Sleep 31 Oct 2013 20:36 #8

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What should one do? :dunno:
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Sleep 31 Oct 2013 20:57 #9

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I don't think we are anyway near yet when it comes down to understanding sleep and its real importance to our overall health.

What do we do? The best for ourselves is the only answer to that I have got. :)
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Sleep 31 Oct 2013 22:46 #10

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Sleep is good. :yup:

For those who have trouble sleeping have you try to make your sleeping environment dark, as in pitch black. It seems to help.
I remember the good old days, when 90+ year olds in nursing homes lived forever. Darn this pesky virus.

1365 = 1

1.1365 = 1,283,305,580,313,352
Last Edit: 31 Oct 2013 22:48 by novum.
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Sleep 31 Oct 2013 23:44 #11

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Yes, pitch black is best, but I have to leave the hallway light on because I'm frightened of things that go bump in the night. :couch:

I'm my own worst enemy. Instead of having the computer on all night, replaying vids that I earlier fell asleep to...I should turn the damn thing off completely. :iitm:
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Sleep 01 Nov 2013 00:47 #12

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The constant refrain from therapists when dealing with this problem, is 'Sleep Hygiene'. Make sure there are no distractions that can encourage even mild activity. Keep your sleeping area clean of things which could involve you.
Like all good advice it is easier said than done.
I maintain a little control by following that and fighting to not drift off at the wrong time, but my body clock is shot to bits, and when I loose control it takes about a week to get back some sort of order.
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Sleep 01 Nov 2013 02:12 #13

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@jonb, It's a bit difficult leaving your brain outside the bedroom door. :umm:

"Whenever you're in conflict with someone, there is one factor that can make the difference between damaging your relationship and deepening it. That factor is attitude." William James
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Sleep 01 Nov 2013 02:16 #14

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pheony wrote:
I'm getting hardly any sleep at the moment. A couple of hours, wake up, go back to sleep, wake up.........

I have noticed that as I'm about to drop off..I'm forcing myself to stay awake by watching something ..I've been watching 'Jerseylicious' :umm: and loving it. :D


Holly shit no wonder you have sleep issues when you keep reminding yourself the world has gone totally bonkers! Are there really guys 'n girls out there that take people like that seriously? Who in their right mind would let their children watch let alone aspire to the likes of that? It's official we are all well and truly feekced!

"Whenever you're in conflict with someone, there is one factor that can make the difference between damaging your relationship and deepening it. That factor is attitude." William James
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Sleep 01 Nov 2013 02:35 #15

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Frog wrote:
pheony wrote:
I'm getting hardly any sleep at the moment. A couple of hours, wake up, go back to sleep, wake up.........

I have noticed that as I'm about to drop off..I'm forcing myself to stay awake by watching something ..I've been watching 'Jerseylicious' :umm: and loving it. :D


Holly shit no wonder you have sleep issues when you keep reminding yourself the world has gone totally bonkers! Are there really guys 'n girls out there that take people like that seriously? Who in their right mind would let their children watch let alone aspire to the likes of that? It's official we are all well and truly feekced!

:D

I watched it for research purposes. :hide: It's the sort of thing that I would usually run a mile from, but the way these people live their lives fascinated me. I've watched all the available episodes now. :( :D

As jonb said "Sleep Hygiene" and no distractions is the way to go, but as you say "it's a bit difficult leaving your brain outside the bedroom door". which is why I have the computer on, to distract my thoughts.
Last Edit: 01 Nov 2013 02:48 by pheony.
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Sleep 01 Nov 2013 09:57 #16

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Pheony, I am the same, I have a fasination for the different, i haven't whatched that, but my daughter used to get very upset when I used to use the phrase-

whose house run's house
Last Edit: 01 Nov 2013 09:58 by jonb.
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Sleep 01 Nov 2013 10:19 #17

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pheony wrote:

The girl on the right (olivia) looks like a jerseyfied Alicia Keys. :yup:
I remember the good old days, when 90+ year olds in nursing homes lived forever. Darn this pesky virus.

1365 = 1

1.1365 = 1,283,305,580,313,352
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Sleep 01 Nov 2013 18:43 #18

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jonb wrote:
Pheony, I am the same, I have a fasination for the different, i haven't whatched that, but my daughter used to get very upset when I used to use the phrase-

whose house run's house

:D

I found some parts of it quite uncomfortable to watch, but look beyond the clothes, make up and fighting and you will find hard working people devoted to their families. They are proud of their Italian Heritage and culture, making no excuses for who they are. If this is how they choose to live, in their 'little Italy' in New Jersey. Then I say 'the best of luck to them'.

Before anyone says 'It's a TV show'...Yes. I know. :D

Communities

Little Italies were, to a considerable extent, the result of Italophobia. The ethnocentrism and anti-Catholicism exhibited by the earlier Anglo-Celtic and northern European settlers helped to create an ideological foundation for fixing foreignness on urban spaces occupied by immigrants.[98] Communities of Italian Americans were established in most major industrial cities of the early 20th century, such as Baltimore, Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts (the "North End"); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Providence, Rhode Island; St. Louis, Missouri; Chicago, Illinois; Cleveland, Ohio; Buffalo, New York; and Kansas City, Missouri. New Orleans, Louisiana was the first site of immigration of Italians and Sicilians into America in the 19th century, before Italy was a unified nation-state. This was before New York Harbor and Baltimore became the preferred destinations for Italian immigrants. In sharp contrast to the Northeast, most of the Southern states (exceptions being the Atlantic coast of Florida, New Orleans, and a fast-growing communities in Atlanta, Houston, and Dallas) have very few Italian-American residents. During the labor shortage in the 19th and early 20th centuries, planters in the Deep South did attract some Italian immigrants to work as sharecroppers, but they soon left the extreme anti-Italian discrimination and strict regimen of the rural areas for the cities or other states. The state of California has had Italian-American residents since the 1850s. By the 1970s gentrification of inner city neighborhoods and the arrival of new immigrant groups caused a sharp decline in the old Italian-American and other ethnic enclaves.[99] Many Italian Americans moved to the rapidly growing Western states, including Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, and California. Today, New York and New Jersey have the largest numbers of Italian Americans in the U.S. while smaller Northeastern cities such as Pittsburgh, Providence and Hartford have the highest percentage of Italian Americans in their metropolitan areas.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_American
Last Edit: 01 Nov 2013 18:45 by pheony.
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Sleep 01 Nov 2013 18:44 #19

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novum wrote:
pheony wrote:

The girl on the right (olivia) looks like a jerseyfied Alicia Keys. :yup:

Yes, she does. Beautiful without all the slap on her face as well.
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Sleep 01 Nov 2013 18:59 #20

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I have never watched it and know nothing about it.....never even knew it existed until now.

Will it help my sleep patterns? :D
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