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TOPIC: Things we have made.

Things we have made. 24 Oct 2016 13:04 #1

  • Gan Anim
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Hello Truthers.

I though for my first post I would introduce myself and show what I have been doing over the last twenty years.

In our current state of austerity where society has been taken by the ankles and shaken vigorously for all we are worth, everything we do for ourselves and one another helps to save the vital savings.
Self sufficiency is now the order of many people's waking day, where alternstive skills is now a much sought after vocation where every little helps them as wants to help themselves.
Over the last twenty plus years I have been gathering the real life skills to bring the following items to life for our own use, I have been professionally trained by some of the best of British craftsmen, as I travel I will explain how this all happened.

My blog can be seen here, rollotomaz1.wordpress.com/about/
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Things we have made. 24 Oct 2016 14:58 #2

  • Voltaire
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Hi Gan Anim

Nice Blog and welcome. I did a saddlery course at the now defunct Cordwainers College in Hackney, though I never practised it. Hand stitching takes a lot of time and thus is not cost effective and I was useless with a sewing machine lol. Sewing a bridle by machine might take only a minute or so, hand stitching could take 2 hours.


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Things we have made. 28 Oct 2016 19:36 #3

Gan Anim wrote:
Hello Truthers.

I though for my first post I would introduce myself and show what I have been doing over the last twenty years.

In our current state of austerity where society has been taken by the ankles and shaken vigorously for all we are worth, everything we do for ourselves and one another helps to save the vital savings.
Self sufficiency is now the order of many people's waking day, where alternstive skills is now a much sought after vocation where every little helps them as wants to help themselves.
Over the last twenty plus years I have been gathering the real life skills to bring the following items to life for our own use, I have been professionally trained by some of the best of British craftsmen, as I travel I will explain how this all happened.

My blog can be seen here, rollotomaz1.wordpress.com/about/

Welcome err umm Apprentice :cool2:
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Things we have made. 07 Nov 2016 14:04 #4

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Voltaire wrote:
Hi Gan Anim

Nice Blog and welcome. I did a saddlery course at the now defunct Cordwainers College in Hackney, though I never practised it. Hand stitching takes a lot of time and thus is not cost effective and I was useless with a sewing machine lol. Sewing a bridle by machine might take only a minute or so, hand stitching could take 2 hours.

Thanks Voltaic

I use the old singer patches, they let you go as fast or as slow as you like using a hand crank.

Here is some of my sheepskin slippers done on the machine and the leather sole's are fixed by hand sewing.

s19.postimg.org/xvnv8rr9v/20160923_134737.jpg

s19.postimg.org/lplccipcj/20160925_155724.jpg
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Things we have made. 07 Nov 2016 14:07 #5

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Voltaire wrote:
Hi Gan Anim

Nice Blog and welcome. I did a saddlery course at the now defunct Cordwainers College in Hackney, though I never practised it. Hand stitching takes a lot of time and thus is not cost effective and I was useless with a sewing machine lol. Sewing a bridle by machine might take only a minute or so, hand stitching could take 2 hours.

Thanks Voltaire

I use the old singer patches, they let you go as fast or as slow as you like using a hand crank.

Here is some of my sheepskin slippers done on the machine and the leather sole's are fixed by hand sewing.

s19.postimg.org/xvnv8rr9v/20160923_134737.jpg :)

s19.postimg.org/lplccipcj/20160925_155724.jpg
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Things we have made. 10 Nov 2016 12:48 #6

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entrangermercenary1 wrote:
Gan Anim wrote:
Hello Truthers.

I though for my first post I would introduce myself and show what I have been doing over the last twenty years.

In our current state of austerity where society has been taken by the ankles and shaken vigorously for all we are worth, everything we do for ourselves and one another helps to save the vital savings.
Self sufficiency is now the order of many people's waking day, where alternstive skills is now a much sought after vocation where every little helps them as wants to help themselves.
Over the last twenty plus years I have been gathering the real life skills to bring the following items to life for our own use, I have been professionally trained by some of the best of British craftsmen, as I travel I will explain how this all happened.

My blog can be seen here, rollotomaz1.wordpress.com/about/

Welcome err umm Apprentice :cool2:
Good to see you here on TZ mate.
:)
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Things we have made. 10 Nov 2016 12:53 #7

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GMP wrote:
entrangermercenary1 wrote:
Gan Anim wrote:
Hello Truthers.

I though for my first post I would introduce myself and show what I have been doing over the last twenty years.

In our current state of austerity where society has been taken by the ankles and shaken vigorously for all we are worth, everything we do for ourselves and one another helps to save the vital savings.
Self sufficiency is now the order of many people's waking day, where alternstive skills is now a much sought after vocation where every little helps them as wants to help themselves.
Over the last twenty plus years I have been gathering the real life skills to bring the following items to life for our own use, I have been professionally trained by some of the best of British craftsmen, as I travel I will explain how this all happened.

My blog can be seen here, rollotomaz1.wordpress.com/about/

Welcome err umm Apprentice :cool2:
Good to see you here on TZ mate.
:)

Thanks GMP how's life?
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Things we have made. 15 Nov 2016 00:30 #8

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Gan Anim wrote:
Voltaire wrote:
Hi Gan Anim

Nice Blog and welcome. I did a saddlery course at the now defunct Cordwainers College in Hackney, though I never practised it. Hand stitching takes a lot of time and thus is not cost effective and I was useless with a sewing machine lol. Sewing a bridle by machine might take only a minute or so, hand stitching could take 2 hours.

Thanks Voltaire

I use the old singer patches, they let you go as fast or as slow as you like using a hand crank.



Here is some of my sheepskin slippers done on the machine and the leather sole's are fixed by hand sewing.

s19.postimg.org/xvnv8rr9v/20160923_134737.jpg :)

s19.postimg.org/lplccipcj/20160925_155724.jpg

That would work. The sewing machines seemed to go from 0 to 60mph in a nano second. Nice slippers


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Things we have made. 01 May 2017 17:41 #9

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New this year to my beekeeping equipment is my own home made version of an apparatus for artificially inseminating Queen honey bees. This now highly popular pass time is being administered in order of breeding into the colony well behaved and calm worker bees and suitable genetics which make use of the clean strains of bee that self eradicates the scourge of the bee world known as the, "Varroa Destructor" which is very much like our human controllers who decimate a human colony by the end of their administration or season.

Show here is my refined design using off of the shelf brass and glass tube and rod end ball joints.

The Base is a triangle of birch plywood covered with a sheet of bronze which is antibacterial in nature and easy to clean afterwards.

The two multi positional manipulator arms hold the Queen secure once she in narcotics ed using a small amount of Co2 inside and from below into her central glass tube.

The sperm is collected from the drones by milking the males by hand and collected into the fine glass needle on the main tool post come X - Y head which helps position the needle prior to insemination using the built in horizontal hydraulic syringe and small adjuster knobs.










image hosting 30 mb

These cost retail around 3500.00 Euros, this one cost me around 85.00 pounds in parts and raw materials and around a fortnights labour, a huge savings and value to myself.
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Last Edit: 01 May 2017 17:45 by Gan Anim.
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Things we have made. 01 May 2017 17:52 #10

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Woodwork is probably my favorite hobby and over the years I have made many useful and functional items like the garden seats and this Amish style wheelbarrow the design given to me by the Amish themselves including a proper English opposed spoke wooden wheel.

The seat was made from birch plywood sides and 50 X 25 mm roofing lathes.





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Thanks for looking.
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Things we have made. 02 May 2017 10:15 #11

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I made this pair of Victorian style long reach fret saws fairly recently to complement my marquetry tool cabinet, and my current hobby project.

Made from the finest Sri Lankan Ebony with matching handle and the other a Brazillian Rosewood with a contrasting Laburnum handle, I purchased the timbers from a closing down sale about 20 years ago and both these timber species are now on the cites list and almost unobtainable today.

These items were once the mainstay of the veneer inlay workers tool chest where some of our finest furniture was produced . They have a cam and screw tensioner and ultra fine 80 teeth per inch marquetry blades.

The bottom rail of the mainframe rest across the lower arm for comfort which aids a straight and level cut.














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Things we have made. 02 May 2017 12:36 #12

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Welcome, Gan Anim. Good stuff.

Not exactly handcrafted from scratch, I've rigged a few boats up from the bare hull over the years. Here's one I did a few years back. The only thing I didn't fit obviously is the tubes to the hull, the centre console, and the fuel tank (under the deck) which came already fitted. Everything else I fitted out myself, including the engines, all the remotes incl the power trim and tilt system on the engines, electronics, including chartplotter and echo-sounding equipment, A-frame (the big stainless steel frame astern bolted to the transom), Nav lights, dive bottle rack etc. Never let me down either. Had the portside engine stall once at sea with 3 people aboard, but got back home safely on the starboard engine at a steady 15-18 knots.. :cool:



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Last Edit: 02 May 2017 14:34 by Zorro.
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Things we have made. 02 May 2017 18:37 #13

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Nice rig you have there, 16 k on one engine, what would it do with two motors running.

I never did have any sea legs, as soon as I hit the water my fine balance senses the imbalance almost immediately, but I can ride large bikes fastest and handle the leans and twists well.

When I served my time as a bike mechanic we also did suzuki outboards and the power those things put out was truly amazing, we had a large water tank that we strapped them into to run them.

Here is a vintage style hand router I made back in 2012 for producing unique beadings from scratch to match some of my old Vienna and Grandfather clock cases I rebuilt. The blade can be set at any angle to do fancy shapes that a electric router cannot handle.

She is made from Desert Ironwood, bronze and brass fittings, the blades are made from those throw away handsaw and then cut to size and then hand filed to match the original woodwork, in the same way 150 years ago, some shapes ever a CNC setup cannot do like over and under curves.











imgur

Skills is my passion no matter what you can do, it's the savings that are well worth a little effort with the spanners in hand, great stuff.
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Last Edit: 02 May 2017 18:39 by Gan Anim.
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Things we have made. 02 May 2017 19:49 #14

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Both engines combined pulled about 45 knots (W.O.T 6,000 rpm) with 3 on board. About 18-20 knots on just the one engine. I also had another Osprey RIB in the same class with a single 130 hp V4 two-stroke Yamaha that was a bit quicker.

You loose about 10% of the combined HP with a twin installation, mainly due to the extra weight.. They were two-stroke's though so lighter and much more torque and response than a four-stroke. It's good having two motors though in case of engine failure at sea. Which sometimes does happen. I've come to the recuse and towed a number of smallcraft back to safety over the years.

That's a very nice vintage hand router. Very well made.
The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. – Marcus Aurelius
Last Edit: 02 May 2017 19:50 by Zorro.
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Things we have made. 02 May 2017 20:04 #15

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I wonder if the Yamaha V4 is similar to the road bike of the mid 80's, it was a 500 cc but only produced about 85 DIN at the rear wheel.

Thanks I've only used the router a couple of times but it really hand to have if I start doing more antique repairs.
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Things we have made. 02 May 2017 20:18 #16

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No, much bigger power head on the Yamaha outboards and a lot more CC. The Yamaha 130 V4 is around 1700 cc, a hell of a lot more fuel consumption too. :chuckle: About 10 gallons an hour at 4,500 rpm.
The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. – Marcus Aurelius
Last Edit: 02 May 2017 20:32 by Zorro.
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Things we have made. 03 May 2017 10:06 #17

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Crickey that's about the same consumption as a Ferrari F40, but I suppose you don't get performance without fuel and CC's, or a high state of tune, certainly not the size we sold at the shop which were tiny in comparison.

When I was still at school my mother worked for dateline boats as a seamstress making the seats and trim and I can remember watching the mechanics there fitting the engines to the speed boats, which were a Ford V6 3 litre attached to a water jet pump, they were quite expensive bits of kit for their day.

Here is another item I made a couple of years ago when I was half way through my shoe making apprenteship on with a local cordwainer, himself seventh generation in his home town of Settle in Yorkshire.

It's a strap and belt cutter which has a cam lock for quick width adjustment and cuts from four inches wide down to half an inch or less. It also has a top steady roller which can be adjusted for thickness of leather.

The handle is made from burr hazel from our farm and fitted with a Sterling silver ferrule.

The cutting blade was made from a broken section of industrial hacksaw.








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Things we have made. 03 May 2017 13:11 #18

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Yep, that's right. Marine engines burn a phenomenal amount of fuel. I had a V6 Johnson in the 200 hp range on the back of an 18.5 ft Fletcher that drank about 15 gallons an hour at 5,000 rpm. A very thirsty engine.. :hahano: Those bigger outboards sound like Formula 1 engines when throttled up. They scream. There's nothing like the sound and the smell of a two stroke outboard in the morning.. You can well imagine the running costs of a pair of 300 hp Mercury race engines.. :hahano: You're looking at around 40 gallons an hour in fuel.





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Last Edit: 03 May 2017 13:19 by Zorro.
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Things we have made. 03 May 2017 13:16 #19

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Your craftsmanship on them tools is excellent.
The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. – Marcus Aurelius
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Things we have made. 03 May 2017 15:13 #20

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Thanks

That last film clip of the Twin Mercury units was freaking awsome, I watched it twice in a row.

The excelleration is bloody quick isn't it, if I had six numbers on Saturday you can guess what I'm gonna be buying poor sea legs or not.
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