Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 15 Dec 2013 15:26 #1

  • pheony
  • pheony's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Voluntarily Inactive
  • Posts: 3399
  • Likes received: 2449
The Occupy Sussex movement has acted as the spark for a new wave of protest against the marketisation of higher education.


A wall outside the University of London Union Building is daubed with paint after protests against a heavy police presence on campus on December 12, 2013.

In 1967, the London School of Economics suspended two students for taking part in demonstrations. The harsh treatment of the duo inspired their peers to hold a sit-in protest and a boycott of lectures. Within weeks, the suspensions were lifted. This began a decade-long student movement that took on social injustice at every turn. Protesting racism, US foreign policy and a whole host of other issues went hand-in-hand with studying in the UK.

Fast-forward 46 years. The University of Sussex suspends five students for their involvement an occupy-style campaign. University management refuse to release evidence of the disruption they have caused and the student body is moved to action. More protests are arranged, a petition is started, messages of support flood in from MPs and academics. Within less than two weeks, senior management buckles to the pressure and the students are reinstated – with a renewed confidence that they can stand up to authority and force through change.

Student protest is back.

www.newstatesman.com/politics/2013/12/student-protest-has-been-quietly-sweeping-nation-now-its-getting-louder
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 15 Dec 2013 15:59 #2

  • cantata
  • cantata's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Silver Member
  • Posts: 2481
  • Likes received: 2679
Good! Students were always one of the most politically active groups. It's nice to see them back. Now.... for the rest of us. :thumbup:

(Incidentally - students are "customers" of Universities nowadays. So this is how Universities treat their customers? Not the best "after sales service" I can think of).
"...Wyrde saves oft the man undoomed
if he undaunted be....". (Beowulf).

"The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths... Beautiful people do not just happen". (Elisabeth Kubler-Ross).


:cavalier
Last Edit: 15 Dec 2013 16:00 by cantata.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.
User(s) who Liked this post: pheony

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 15 Dec 2013 16:36 #3

  • hagrid
  • hagrid's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Fresh Member
  • Posts: 107
  • Likes received: 64
students are ALWAYS protesting.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.
User(s) who Liked this post: pheony

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 15 Dec 2013 21:38 #4

  • Chuck Random
  • Chuck Random's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Voluntarily Inactive
  • Posts: 1173
  • Likes received: 750
Really good to see the amount of action from students atm. That Sussex pop-up union was great as well. :thumbup:







No War But The Class War
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.
User(s) who Liked this post: pheony, cantata

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 16 Dec 2013 13:19 #5

  • hagrid
  • hagrid's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Fresh Member
  • Posts: 107
  • Likes received: 64
I'd be more impressed if they put the same effort into their education.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 16 Dec 2013 14:20 #6

  • Paul Tootall
  • Paul Tootall's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Fresh Member
  • Currently researching things they don't want you to know
  • Posts: 428
  • Likes received: 606
hagrid wrote:
I'd be more impressed if they put the same effort into their education.

They are doing a lot better here than much of the indoctrination they would be engaged in. Here they are learning a big lesson... how to stand up for your rights and freedoms...
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.
User(s) who Liked this post: Hexhammer, cantata

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 16 Dec 2013 14:46 #7

  • hagrid
  • hagrid's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Fresh Member
  • Posts: 107
  • Likes received: 64
all their learning is how to get "kettled" by the riot squad. :chuckle:
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 16 Dec 2013 19:42 #8

  • Hexhammer
  • Hexhammer's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Voluntarily Inactive
  • Karma is a bitch.
  • Posts: 1403
  • Likes received: 1676
At least they're out there trying to make a difference.... Most people never do anything anyway.
"I've often felt that dreams are answers to questions we haven't yet figured out how to ask."
-Agent Fox Mulder
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.
User(s) who Liked this post: cantata, Paul Tootall

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 17 Dec 2013 14:25 #9

  • hagrid
  • hagrid's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Fresh Member
  • Posts: 107
  • Likes received: 64
yes, but do TPTB listen ?or is it " oh-its only the students protesting again"?? students have been protesting since the 1960s and the ban the bomb marches but did they ever achieve anything? the way to alter THE SYSTEM is from within THE SYSTEM.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 17 Dec 2013 14:49 #10

  • ..........
  • ..........'s Avatar
  • Offline
  • Straight Shooter
  • Posts: 10321
  • Likes received: 2933
hagrid wrote:
yes, but do TPTB listen ?or is it " oh-its only the students protesting again"?? students have been protesting since the 1960s and the ban the bomb marches but did they ever achieve anything? the way to alter THE SYSTEM is from within THE SYSTEM.

alot of truth in this post...
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.
User(s) who Liked this post: hagrid

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 17 Dec 2013 15:43 #11

  • jonb
  • jonb's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 1730
  • Likes received: 1951
You cannot alter it from within. To be within it you have to adhere to it. There are many within that would like to alter its structure, but whenever it has been tried the person or persons loose their position in the structure and therefore any power to make the alteration.You may imagine a prime-minister or president might have the power, but they only retain it as long as they benefit the bodies that gave them their position. The structure is way more powerful than the individuals within it they are mere figure heads with little control at all.
To be within it is to be impotent.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 17 Dec 2013 16:52 #12

  • hagrid
  • hagrid's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Fresh Member
  • Posts: 107
  • Likes received: 64
ditto outside the system too. protests only get people locked up.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Student protest has been quietly sweeping the nation. Now, it's getting louder 02 Feb 2014 10:32 #13

  • Chuck Random
  • Chuck Random's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Voluntarily Inactive
  • Posts: 1173
  • Likes received: 750
Campus arrests; student solidarity: what happened at Birmingham University and why it helped forge a movement

14 students were arrested and many more contained for a number of hours at a protest at Birmingham University this week. One of those involved tells his side of the story.

“At the sign, rush into the clock tower” whispered the activists who had crept up on my right. Before I had a chance to ask what she meant, hundreds of grinning students were rushing forward and linking arms around the clocktower. The students, most of whom were too young to have taken part in the 2010 demonstrations, defiantly took their positions and looked around eagerly.

This demonstration was taking place on the main campus of the University of Birmingham, and if the students were eager to assert their right to protest on campus, then that was understandable. Over the past few months, students across the country have repeatedly faced injunctions, suspensions, disciplinary actions, gagging clauses, arrests, and police brutality in their fight against a 13% pay cut for their staff and draconian measures intended to stifle campus democracy. In Birmingham alone, five students are currently being hauled through a disciplinary process for peacefully protesting on campus, having been identified as ‘ringleaders’ by the University.

Earlier in the day, Birmingham had played host to hundreds of activists from universities and colleges across the country. Recognising the common themes in the work we carry out on our campuses, we’d come together to further our understanding of how these struggles related. Together, we hoped to raise a common set of demands - a manifesto of what we stood for rather than what we were against. Rejecting all tropes, this conference was one of passion and excitement with intelligent points made and conceded with equal grace; the document which emerged outlines a bold re-envisioning of education and its publication will serve as a rallying cry for future students.

Make no mistake, a rallying cry is what we need. Our vision of education is one which is free, fair, and funded; where academics and students decide what to research and study based on academic merit and not the interest of private business; where staff are treated with respect, paid fairly, and have meaningful control over where they work. In short, our vision of education is anathema to the government and to University management and as such won’t be won except through struggle - as this demonstration went on to prove.

Following the seizure of the clocktower - and the subsequent supersized banner drop - a lively demonstration began weaving its way across campus, doing its best to startle any potential students attending the University’s Open Day, with most participants carefully making sure that scarves or balaclavas concealed their identity. What seemed to be to be a melodramatic level of concern over privacy was swiftly justified, with almost every window of the buildings we passed containing a smug faced security guard with a camera attempting to catch the faces of the protesters on film.

Undeterred, students attempted several times to gain access to the central University administration hub to hold a sit-in protest but were each time pushed back by the University’s seemingly endless private army of security guards, who were none too shy with using force to keep students out of University buildings.



View
What links here

Campus arrests; student solidarity: what happened at Birmingham University and why it helped forge a movement
Max Crema 31 January 2014
Subjects:

student protest
UK

Printer-friendly versionSend to friendPDF version Facebook Twitter

14 students were arrested and many more contained for a number of hours at a protest at Birmingham University this week. One of those involved tells his side of the story.

“At the sign, rush into the clock tower” whispered the activists who had crept up on my right. Before I had a chance to ask what she meant, hundreds of grinning students were rushing forward and linking arms around the clocktower. The students, most of whom were too young to have taken part in the 2010 demonstrations, defiantly took their positions and looked around eagerly.

(Image: Lou Macnamara)

This demonstration was taking place on the main campus of the University of Birmingham, and if the students were eager to assert their right to protest on campus, then that was understandable. Over the past few months, students across the country have repeatedly faced injunctions, suspensions, disciplinary actions, gagging clauses, arrests, and police brutality in their fight against a 13% pay cut for their staff and draconian measures intended to stifle campus democracy. In Birmingham alone, five students are currently being hauled through a disciplinary process for peacefully protesting on campus, having been identified as ‘ringleaders’ by the University.

Earlier in the day, Birmingham had played host to hundreds of activists from universities and colleges across the country. Recognising the common themes in the work we carry out on our campuses, we’d come together to further our understanding of how these struggles related. Together, we hoped to raise a common set of demands - a manifesto of what we stood for rather than what we were against. Rejecting all tropes, this conference was one of passion and excitement with intelligent points made and conceded with equal grace; the document which emerged outlines a bold re-envisioning of education and its publication will serve as a rallying cry for future students.

Make no mistake, a rallying cry is what we need. Our vision of education is one which is free, fair, and funded; where academics and students decide what to research and study based on academic merit and not the interest of private business; where staff are treated with respect, paid fairly, and have meaningful control over where they work. In short, our vision of education is anathema to the government and to University management and as such won’t be won except through struggle - as this demonstration went on to prove.

Following the seizure of the clocktower - and the subsequent supersized banner drop - a lively demonstration began weaving its way across campus, doing its best to startle any potential students attending the University’s Open Day, with most participants carefully making sure that scarves or balaclavas concealed their identity. What seemed to be to be a melodramatic level of concern over privacy was swiftly justified, with almost every window of the buildings we passed containing a smug faced security guard with a camera attempting to catch the faces of the protesters on film.

Undeterred, students attempted several times to gain access to the central University administration hub to hold a sit-in protest but were each time pushed back by the University’s seemingly endless private army of security guards, who were none too shy with using force to keep students out of University buildings.


Eventually, via a conveniently unguarded back door, we found our way into the Birmingham University Great Hall (where this hilariously bad recruitment video was filmed at a cost which the University have refused to disclose -) and promptly sang some songs of our own.

Unbeknownst to the students drying out inside, police and security began moving in on the the courtyard the students had entered through. When we left the Great Hall we were greeted by a row of police and security blocking the stairs out of the courtyard, leaving us split with the majority trapped in a courtyard surrounded by buildings on three sides, and a 12 foot drop on the other. Making sexist jokes and pushing younger activists around, the University security forces made it clear that those trapped within the courtyard would not be allowed to leave.

In contrast to the cartoon villain style behaviour of the University’s security force the Police simply ignored the protesters, apart from preventing them leaving, while they waited for reinforcements. While later police statements have denied that protesters were kettled, I’m unsure what else you call a police line holding in protesters against their will for over four hours.

During this time students were trapped, exposed to the wind, and denied access to food, water, and a toilet while 50 police and a number of dogs were rustled up to begin processing them. Without being informed of why they were being held and under what legislation, the protesters began growing nervous and cold. As the hours stretched on, prolonged exposure to pouring rain, freezing wind, and stress took their toll. One student fell and was found on the floor in extreme pain. Shockingly, the police refused to allow an ambulance to be called and the student has since been hospitalised.

Slowly police began leading students, one at a time, down the stairs where they were given the choice of giving the police their details (and undoubtedly ending up on a database for the rest of their life) or facing immediate arrest. The practice of only releasing people from kettles if they hand their details over to the police has been ruled as illegal by the High Court, but that seems not to have bothered the police on this occasion.

In total, 14 students were arrested on this demonstration, most of whom were held for over 30 hours in jail before being released without charge on bail conditions which read more like authoritarian house arrest orders, while two are being taken to court. Two Birmingham students have been suspended from their studies, banned from campus, and will face disciplinary action. It seems that the crackdown on student dissent is far from over.

As students emerged from police lines on the night, either with their details in a database or their hands in cuffs, they had cause to smile. From organising tea for those emerging shaken from police lines, to organising ladders in an attempt to rescue some of those trapped above them, those who had ended up outside of the kettle hadn’t been idle.

Throughout the night, police repeatedly asked those not in the kettle why they were waiting around, and even fruitlessly tried to chase them away.The incomprehension and outright hostility towards the solidarity demonstration outside the ketting wasn’t coincidental. The purpose of police oppression is to separate people. Physically, this can be as obvious as the physical separation enforced by a kettle but it can also take the form of the suspicion which undercover police breed within groups, the strains which legal action can put on friendships, or the destruction of trust which outright collaboration can have on an institution.

Solidarity lasts beyond the act which creates it. While we began the day as strangers in a conference, the support we showed for each other, both inside and out of the kettle, built connections, networks, and trust which will outlast the demonstration itself. Our unity is our strength. We laughed in the face of the police who tried to divide us and as a result we have grown stronger, just as we did when they arrested 41 people in London two months ago. This movement isn’t going anywhere.



opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/max-crema/campus-arrests-student-solidarity-what-happened-at-birmingham-university-and-wh#.Uuv6rT6CO-8.twitter

No War But The Class War
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.
User(s) who Liked this post: cantata
Moderators: novum, rodin, Flare
Powered by Kunena Forum

Annual Server Target

Whether its 50 cents or five dollars, your donations are appreciated and help keep this community site running so we can all continue to enjoy using it.
This target is to meet our server cost for one year, June 2020 - May 2021, in USD.
$ 340 - Target
( £ 250 GBP )
donation thermometer
donation thermometer
$ 192 - Raised
( £ 140 GBP )
donation thermometer
56%
Most Recent Donation $122 USD
4th January 2021
Bitcoin Address: bc1q0kazqya0nurfxtunxv807vm0m8852nnrrk8mj8
 
Ethereum Address: 0xe69915c80dd75df19f438d556267e04f932f057d
 
More Info: Donation options for TZ
 

No one is obliged to donate, please only donate what you can afford. Even the smallest amount helps. Being an active member is a positive contribution. Thank You.