Your donations are appreciated and help keep this site running. Even the smallest amount helps.
Thankyou

 
PROMOTE YOUR SITE
HERE
Only $3 USD/month
TRUTHSPOON.COM
The man they can't recruit!
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: Insect APOCALYPSE?

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 10:09 #1

  • Frothy
  • Frothy's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 14135
  • Likes received: 1580
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 10:18 #2

  • Frothy
  • Frothy's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 14135
  • Likes received: 1580
Insect Resistance to GMO Corn and Cotton Bt Crops with Insect Protection
monsanto.com/company/media/statements/insect-resistance-bt/

German pharma and life sciences firm Bayer said it completed the "biggest acquisition in its history" Wednesday but delivered a series of mixed results for its second quarter.

Bayer gave more details of the acquisition of U.S. firm Monsanto, which officially completed on June 7 this year and came in at $63 billion, including debt. The purchase helped its core earnings for the second quarter and offset weak health care sales.

Here are some of the highlights for the second quarter:

Net income fell 34.7 percent from the previous quarter to 799 million euros ($923 million).
Depreciation, amortization and impairments dropped slightly from the previous quarter to 666 million euros.
Core earnings per share rose 1.3 percent to 1.54 euros.

Adjusted earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization came in at 2.34 billion euros ($2.71 billion) for the period. This narrowly missed estimates from a Reuters poll. Net income for the quarter saw a 34.7 percent fall, but it also reported an 8.8 percent increase in sales from a year ago, taking its total group sales to 9.48 billion euros.

Capitalism in a nutshell.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 10:23 #3

  • Rocco
  • Rocco's Avatar
  • Online
  • Gold Member
  • Gradually I began to hate them
  • Posts: 5662
  • Likes received: 1265
Wars, Genocide, Mass Immigration, Propaganda, Indoctrination, Social Engineering, Mind Control, Class of Civilizations, etc.

Let's worry about the bugs....

.....and blame the rich people :facepalm:
"Sometimes democracy must be bathed in blood"
- Augusto Pinochet

"I'm going to fight. I'm going to fight. Now, this is easier for me because I'm used to it. The rest of you are gonna have a tougher choice. Look, I don't want to sell it to you; it's too ugly for that. It's ugly, and it's hard. But when you're fighting in your own backyard, and you're fighting for your family, it all hurts a little less and it makes a little more sense. And for them, this is just some place, but for us? This is our home" - Jed Eckert:
Last Edit: 16 Feb 2019 10:24 by Rocco.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 10:30 #4

  • Frothy
  • Frothy's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 14135
  • Likes received: 1580
Study Highlights

• Over 40% of insect species are threatened with extinction.

• Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera and dung beetles (Coleoptera) are the taxa most affected.

• Four aquatic taxa are imperiled and have already lost a large proportion of species.

• Habitat loss by conversion to intensive agriculture is the main driver of the declines.

• Agro-chemical pollutants, invasive species and climate change are additional causes.

Abstract

Biodiversity of insects is threatened worldwide. Here, we present a comprehensive review of 73 historical reports of insect declines from across the globe, and systematically assess the underlying drivers. Our work reveals dramatic rates of decline that may lead to the extinction of 40% of the world’s insect species over the next few decades.

In terrestrial ecosystems, Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera and dung beetles (Coleoptera) appear to be the taxa most affected, whereas four major aquatic taxa (Odonata, Plecoptera, Trichoptera and Ephemeroptera) have already lost a considerable proportion of species. Affected insect groups not only include specialists that occupy particular ecological niches, but also many common and generalist species. Concurrently, the abundance of a small number of species is increasing; these are all adaptable, generalist species that are occupying the vacant niches left by the ones declining.

Among aquatic insects, habitat and dietary generalists, and pollutant-tolerant species are replacing the large biodiversity losses experienced in waters within agricultural and urban settings. The main drivers of species declines appear to be in order of importance: i) habitat loss and conversion to intensive agriculture and urbanisation; ii) pollution, mainly that by synthetic pesticides and fertilisers; iii) biological factors, including pathogens and introduced species; and iv) climate change. The latter factor is particularly important in tropical regions, but only affects a minority of species in colder climes and mountain settings of temperate zones.

A rethinking of current agricultural practices, in particular a serious reduction in pesticide usage and its substitution with more sustainable, ecologically-based practices, is urgently needed to slow or reverse current trends, allow the recovery of declining insect populations and safeguard the vital ecosystem services they provide. In addition, effective remediation technologies should be applied to clean polluted waters in both agricultural and urban environments
sustainablepulse.com/2019/02/14/serious-threat-of-industrial-agriculture-and-pesticides-put-in-focus-by-global-insect-study/#.XGflm-j7TIU
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 10:46 #5

  • Frothy
  • Frothy's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 14135
  • Likes received: 1580
Last year, a study that found an 82 per cent mid-summer decline in the number and weight of bugs captured in traps in 63 nature preserves in Germany compared with 27 years earlier. It was one of the few, if only, broad studies. Scientists say similar comparisons can’t be done elsewhere, because similar bug counts weren’t done decades ago.
After the German study, countries started asking if they have similar problems, said ecologist Toke Thomas Hoye of Aarhus University in Denmark. He studied flies in a few spots in remote Greenland and noticed an 80 per cent drop in numbers since 1996.

globalnews.ca/news/4468234/insect-declines-study/
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 10:48 #6

  • Lux Interior
  • Lux Interior's Avatar
  • Online
  • Senior Member
  • Do you know de way?
  • Posts: 1861
  • Likes received: 783
What's the deal with bees Frothy, we see a lot of arm waving about their decline being linked to ours.?
liberabo te ab inferno
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 10:49 #7

  • Frothy
  • Frothy's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 14135
  • Likes received: 1580
Two new studies from Europe show that the number of birds in agricultural areas of France has crashed by a third in just 15 years, with some species being almost eradicated. The collapse in the bird population mirrors the discovery last October that more than three quarters of all flying insects in Germany have vanished in just three decades. Insects are the staple food source of birds, the pollinators of fruits and the aerators of the soil.

The chief suspect in this mass extinction is the aggressive use of neonicotinoid pesticides, particularly imidacloprid and clothianidin, both made by the Germany-based chemical giant Bayer. These pesticides, along with toxic glyphosate herbicides such as Roundup, have delivered a one-two punch to monarch butterflies, honeybees and birds. But rather than banning these toxic chemicals, on March 21 the EU approved the $66 billion merger of Bayer and Monsanto, the U.S. agribusiness giant that produces Roundup and the genetically modified (GMO) seeds that have reduced seed diversity globally. The merger will make the Bayer-Monsanto conglomerate the largest seed and pesticide company in the world, giving it enormous power to control farm practices, putting private profits over the public interest.

www.truthdig.com/articles/the-bayer-monsanto-merger-is-bad-news-for-the-planet/


Disgusting!
Last Edit: 16 Feb 2019 10:51 by Frothy.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 10:57 #8

  • Frothy
  • Frothy's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 14135
  • Likes received: 1580
Lux Interior wrote:
What's the deal with bees Frothy, we see a lot of arm waving about their decline being linked to ours.?

I'm not sure exactly but it's said to be combination of a few factors such as,. the agricultural chemicals which effects their immune system, and something about having a few species of plant over wide areas rather than the traditional variety so that the bees are not getting the same variety of input into their diet.
Last Edit: 16 Feb 2019 11:05 by Frothy.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 11:02 #9

  • Frothy
  • Frothy's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 14135
  • Likes received: 1580
Changes in our land use, including insensitive urban development and intensive farming, have caused significant losses and fragmentation of pollinator-friendly habitats. This results in bees losing the diverse food sources they need for a healthy diet.

It’s vital that bees have enough flowers to forage – and safe places to use for nesting, among vegetation, the soil and hedges. But since the Second World War, we’ve lost 97% of our wildflower meadows, leaving our bees with little natural habitat.
Even when applied correctly, pesticides can have adverse impacts on bees by reducing their breeding success and resistance to disease. Scientists have found that exposure to pesticides can impair honeybees' ability to navigate, bumblebees' ability to reproduce and solitary bees' ability to reproduce any young at all.

Pesticides are designed to kill unwanted pests, but their toxic properties and widespread use are also harming beneficial insects such as bees.
friendsoftheearth.uk/bees/what-are-causes-bee-decline
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 11:40 #10

  • Rocco
  • Rocco's Avatar
  • Online
  • Gold Member
  • Gradually I began to hate them
  • Posts: 5662
  • Likes received: 1265
Lux Interior wrote:
What's the deal with bees Frothy, we see a lot of arm waving about their decline being linked to ours.?
Me and my boy walked into a beehive behind our house last week and got stung, hundreds of 'm. Fuck them bees. I'm gonna poor gasoline on them and set them on fire
"Sometimes democracy must be bathed in blood"
- Augusto Pinochet

"I'm going to fight. I'm going to fight. Now, this is easier for me because I'm used to it. The rest of you are gonna have a tougher choice. Look, I don't want to sell it to you; it's too ugly for that. It's ugly, and it's hard. But when you're fighting in your own backyard, and you're fighting for your family, it all hurts a little less and it makes a little more sense. And for them, this is just some place, but for us? This is our home" - Jed Eckert:
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 11:48 #11

  • Frothy
  • Frothy's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 14135
  • Likes received: 1580
Approximately 80 percent of all Earth plants are angiosperms, or flowering plants, that require pollination from either bees, butterflies or other pollinating insects. Sometimes the wind and animals are able to assist with pollination, but the majority is done by insects. Without these pollinators, most plant life on Earth would disappear.

Between 50 and 90 percent of the human diet comes from flowering plants, since angiosperms include the grains wheat and rice, as well as fruits and vegetables. These food staples also make up the diets of the animals that people eat, including chickens, cows, pigs and most freshwater fish. "Most of our food is insect-dependent," said Davidowitz. "If insects disappear, a lot of mammals and birds disappear, too, because if you don't have insects pollinating, even those animals that don't eat insects won't have fruit and foliage to eat. It does have a domino effect."
thescienceexplorer.com/nature/what-would-happen-if-all-earth-s-insects-vanished


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayer
Last Edit: 16 Feb 2019 11:50 by Frothy.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 11:52 #12

  • Lux Interior
  • Lux Interior's Avatar
  • Online
  • Senior Member
  • Do you know de way?
  • Posts: 1861
  • Likes received: 783
Rocco wrote:
Lux Interior wrote:
What's the deal with bees Frothy, we see a lot of arm waving about their decline being linked to ours.?
Me and my boy walked into a beehive behind our house last week and got stung, hundreds of 'm. Fuck them bees. I'm gonna poor gasoline on them and set them on fire

Before you do that challenge them to an arm wrestling contest, see how the stripy little fuckers like that.
liberabo te ab inferno
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 11:54 #13

  • Lux Interior
  • Lux Interior's Avatar
  • Online
  • Senior Member
  • Do you know de way?
  • Posts: 1861
  • Likes received: 783
So Frothy, the deal here is destroy natural pollinators and introduce frankenplants right? For money and control or one over the other?
liberabo te ab inferno
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 12:01 #14

  • Rocco
  • Rocco's Avatar
  • Online
  • Gold Member
  • Gradually I began to hate them
  • Posts: 5662
  • Likes received: 1265
Sounds like Leftist Smokescreens to distract from the real issues to me

We have no shortage of bugs here in SE Asia
"Sometimes democracy must be bathed in blood"
- Augusto Pinochet

"I'm going to fight. I'm going to fight. Now, this is easier for me because I'm used to it. The rest of you are gonna have a tougher choice. Look, I don't want to sell it to you; it's too ugly for that. It's ugly, and it's hard. But when you're fighting in your own backyard, and you're fighting for your family, it all hurts a little less and it makes a little more sense. And for them, this is just some place, but for us? This is our home" - Jed Eckert:
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 12:12 #15

  • Lux Interior
  • Lux Interior's Avatar
  • Online
  • Senior Member
  • Do you know de way?
  • Posts: 1861
  • Likes received: 783
Roundup is insidious, I don't know about scaremongering but chucking poison around can't be a good thing, the question is are we doing it in a quantity that is harmful.
I prefer nature to humans anyway.
Tip for you matey, bees are easily distracted, bear that in mind if they wheel out their champion in the contest. A quick ooh look at that giant pot of honey. Could make or break the contest. Mines a large red cheers.
liberabo te ab inferno
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Insect APOCALYPSE? 16 Feb 2019 12:13 #16

  • Frothy
  • Frothy's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 14135
  • Likes received: 1580
Lux Interior wrote:
So Frothy, the deal here is destroy natural pollinators and introduce frankenplants right? For money and control or one over the other?

Something like that but those modified plants still require to be pollinated afaik, the idea is to have them more robust and easier to manage/less likely to be damaged, thus to increase profits.

The other problem is the decline of flowered meadows/ floral hedgerows etc...so insects have less habitat all round.

Another factor is they get attracted to light at night and head for urban areas where there is even less habitat for them.

I've noticed over the past few years that when I drive in the summer there are less dead insects on my car windscreen/front end, and I've also noticed less small birds like sparrows about, that's just my own observation though.

There are ways that this could be turned around for example all traffic roundabouts could have floral arrangements on them, as well as road boundaries etc etc, plant wildflowers in waste land.

I've come to the conclusion that there's more to this than just killing insects, for example it's rare to hear people whistling a tune as they walk in the street nowadays, people are more depressed. Whistling is an indication of being content, flowers are cheerful, birds singing is cheerful, the manufacturing industry in the UK is fucked, it's mainly a service industry now, instead of making things we're delivering pizzas and fiddling with android devices.

The general public are being led into depression, if our food become diminished due to lack of pollination at the base of it, we'll become more depressed due to lack of vitamin/variety.

We're heading towards frankenfood, killing our friends the insects is a means to an end.
Last Edit: 16 Feb 2019 12:36 by Frothy.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.
Moderators: novum
Powered by Kunena Forum

Annual Server Target

Whether its 50 cents or five dollars, your donations are appreciated and help keep this community site running so we can all continue to enjoy using it. Secure transactions via paypal.
This target is to meet our server cost for one year, June 2018 - May 2019, in USD.
$ 340 - Target
( £ 265 GBP )
donation thermometer
donation thermometer
$ 340 - Raised
( £ 265 GBP )
donation thermometer
100%
Updated
30th November 2018

No one is obliged to donate, please only donate what you can afford. Even the smallest amount helps. Being an active member is a positive contribution. Thank You.