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TOPIC: Just Oil?

Just Oil? 23 Dec 2013 23:43 #1

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A section of Iraq supergun
Project Babylon was a project with unknown objectives commissioned by the then Iraqi president Saddam Hussein to build a series of 'superguns'. The design was based on research from the 1960s Project HARP led by the Canadian artillery expert Gerald Bull. There were most likely four different devices in the program.
The project began in 1988; it was halted in 1990 after Gerald Bull was assassinated, and parts of these superguns were seized in transit around Europe. The components that remained in Iraq were destroyed by the United Nations after the 1991 Gulf War.
Wiki

Eric Laithwaite

link to video
It is all good but 15:00 to 15:42 is nice to look at today.
Now what would a section of Eric's gun look like without the wire coiled around it?
Last Edit: 23 Dec 2013 23:48 by jonb.
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Just Oil? 23 Dec 2013 23:59 #2

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The Man Behind Iraq's Supergun
By Kevin Toolis; Kevin Toolis is a reporter for The Sunday Correspondent of London
Published: August 26, 1990

On a quiet evening this March, in the leafy Brussels suburb of Uccle, Gerald Bull walked down the hallway leading to his apartment and pulled out the key to his door. It was the last thing he ever did.

Behind him, hidden in the shadows, an assassin stepped forward and fired two 7.65-millimeter rounds at point-blank range into the back of his skull.

The killing bore all the hallmarks of a professional job. No one heard the silenced shots or the sound of the body slumping to the floor. No one saw the gunman. The $20,000 in cash Bull was carrying remained untouched.

Gerald Vincent Bull, the world's greatest artillery expert, did not die alone. As the 62-year-old scientist fell to the floor, his lifetime obsession died with him: the dream of building a Supergun, a huge howitzer able to blast satellites into space or launch artillery shells thousands of miles into enemy territory.

Two weeks later, in the obscure English Midlands port of Teesport, British Customs would seize eight huge steel tubes, a meter across, designed to slot into a gun barrel 60 meters long. Labeled ''petroleum pipes,'' they had been innocently manufactured by Sheffield Forgemasters, a British steelworks, and were waiting to be loaded on a freighter bound for Iraq.

www.nytimes.com/1990/08/26/magazine/the-man-behind-iraq-s-supergun.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm
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Just Oil? 24 Dec 2013 00:12 #3

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Said to be able to launch a two ton projectile into orbit.
Note in the tube there are no ancillary holes for subsequent explosives after the initial blast which is how a large conventional large scale gun would have to work. We are just looking at tubes not made of a material that would make a good gun barrel. And there is no rifling inside, strange are we to believe in super shot gun?
Last Edit: 24 Dec 2013 00:15 by jonb.
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Just Oil? 24 Dec 2013 00:40 #4

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Strange things started happening when journalist David Hellier got stuck into investigating possible British Government connivance in illegal arms sales to Iraq.

Accidents and a death.......

During this period something happened to unsettle me. I was walking home one night on the pavement of a busy main road when a car slid onto the pavement and knocked me to the ground. I was shocked but not badly hurt. Though I believed this to be an accident my contacts in the defence world thought otherwise. They told me that it was also likely my phone was being tapped and that I was being followed. I had no evidence of this, but it was worrying all the same. On one occasion I spotted a photographer taking pictures of me with one of my contacts as we sat in a pub during one of his days on release from prison.

I then discovered that another journalist, who was working on the same story at the London Observer newspaper, had received a warning that something might happen if she continued her investigations. Her paper took this seriously and put her up in a hotel for a few days.

Other things happened to disturb me. One of my contacts died suddenly, days after giving me a lift to the trial of the former chief executive of Astra who was being charged with corruption. The person in question, Lionel Jones, complained on the way down to the trial about a boil on his neck. Whilst his sudden death appeared to me to be bad luck, again my contacts thought otherwise.

It soon became clear to me that I would need some sort of support from my newspaper if I were to continue working on the story. At the very least I would need somebody to talk to. This was not forthcoming at the re-styled Sunday Correspondent whose editors did not think I should be spending time on this story. I was effectively silenced. I moved on to the Independent newspaper, where I was able to work intermittently on the story whilst doing more regular financial journalism.

Then, in early summer 1992 the Parliamentary Select Committee stepped up its inquiries into the Iraqi supergun affair. When did the Government know about the supergun? Why did it allow firms to carry on supplying it? And why, having arrested the people who did so, did customs officers then drop all charges against the accused?

For a few weeks the Independent became keen on the arms story. Alas, just as I was making progress and provoking the threat of injunctions from some fairly powerful people, the paper moved me on to another story which was considered more important. I decided to leave.

www.lifeinthemix.info/profile/insight-iraq-supergun/

Do you think this supergun was going to be used to 'shoot' into space, at say, satellites, jonb?
Last Edit: 24 Dec 2013 00:58 by pheony.
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Just Oil? 24 Dec 2013 01:15 #5

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In documents filed with the UN Special Commission 18 July 1991, Iraq admitted possessing a gun with a barrel 350 millimeters wide and 45 meters long and that it was building a second one. The commission noted that the gun would have been inaccurate for conventional armaments, and that it was trying to determine if the weapon was intended for chemical, biological, or nuclear use. The superguns were potentially capable of firing chemical, biological and nuclear weapons to a range of up to 1,000 km.
The high-ranking Iraqi defector Gen. Hussein Kamel al-Majeed said Iraq was working on a space weapon launched from the supergun.

"It was meant for long-range attack and also to blind spy satellites. Our scientists were seriously working on that. It was designed to explode a shell in space that would have sprayed a sticky material on the satellite and blinded it."
He also said the supergun could have delivered a nuclear device.

www.fas.org/nuke/guide/iraq/other/supergun.htm
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Just Oil? 24 Dec 2013 01:40 #6

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Once an object is in orbit, it can come down anywhere, as such the guns range would be the whole of the Earth. Also if it was electromagnetic, it would not need an initial explosive charge, but the barrel would be used to increase the speed of the projectile. It is only speculation on my part, but that would mean it could be capable of projecting a manned capsule. I heard a few years back it should be capable of 'firing' many times a day with a payload of two tons, a delivery system like that would far outreach any conventional rocket system, it could be launching more than all other countries put together. Once in orbit, parts can be connected together, that is how the space station was built. And once in place it would be incredibly cheep to run.
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