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TOPIC: NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow

NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 22 Nov 2014 22:56 #81

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PFIZIPFEI wrote:



step three to me looks rather like a





They should fire their lousy graphic artists!
Or whoever is responsible for this trash.


Find the difference! I was unable to find a single one comparing the first, allegedly 2014, and the last, allegedly 2010 photo:

truth-zone.net/forum/space-and-related-subjects/64553-x-37b-secret-mission.html#134819

:joker:
"The truth must be repeated over and over again,
because error is repeatedly preached among us, not
only by individuals, but by the masses. In periodicals
and cyclopaedias, in schools and universities; every-
where, in fact, error prevails, and is quite easy in the
feeling that it has a decided majority on its side."

~ J. W. v. Goethe

Johannes Lang "The Hollow World Theory" Blog
My Zone by PFIZIPFEI
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 22 Nov 2014 23:35 #82

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PFIZIPFEI wrote:
They should fire their lousy graphic artists!
Or whoever is responsible for this trash.

I was joking the other day that the reason the more recent moon and space photoshop images we see are so lame is because they cant let the cat far out of the bag, so cant hire proper artists to do it :chuckle: ... someone high on the food chain is making them themselves :chuckle:

I do think its possible too that they actually have used a spray painted umbrella on that moon vehicle there ffs. :chuckle: You may be right P.

Slightly off topic but i think this work was much better :wissl:

He who is without oil shall throw the first rod.
- Compressions 13.3:1
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 22 Nov 2014 23:50 #83

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Even IRON SKY trash is much better, at least it is more entertaining and much funnier,
although they are definitely aligned from the start. Shoefinns or Finnshoes? :dunno:

:cool2:
"The truth must be repeated over and over again,
because error is repeatedly preached among us, not
only by individuals, but by the masses. In periodicals
and cyclopaedias, in schools and universities; every-
where, in fact, error prevails, and is quite easy in the
feeling that it has a decided majority on its side."

~ J. W. v. Goethe

Johannes Lang "The Hollow World Theory" Blog
My Zone by PFIZIPFEI
Last Edit: 23 Nov 2014 00:42 by PFIZIPFEI.
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 03:14 #84

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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 03:30 #85

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True Fakes: Scientists Make Simulated Moondust
That led to JSC-1 in
1993, made of basaltic volcanic cinder cone deposits from a quarry near Flagstaff, AZ. The 25-ton
lot -- distributed in 50-pound bags -- proved popular.
"We're totally out, but that's soon to be corrected," said McKay. MSFC has a Small Business
Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with Orbitec of Madison, WI, to manufacture about 16 metric
tonnes of three types of JSC-1A: 1 tonne of fines (delivered); 14 tonnes of moderate grains (being
delivered); and 1 tonne of coarse grains (coming soon). The U.S. Geological Survey in Denver and
the University of Colorado at Boulder -- key partners -- are checking the chemical, mineralogical,
and geotechnical properties.
MSFC is developing three new simulants. Two will represent mare and polar highlands regions. A
third will represent the glassy, sharp, jagged edges of regolith that test the best of hardware and
humans. But matching every location on the Moon would require large numbers of small, unique,
expensive batches.
"Instead, we will develop root simulants and manufacture specific simulants from these, but also
enable investigators to enhance the products as needed," McLemore added. "I liken this process to
baking a cake: depending on the type of cake you want, you need certain ingredients for it to
come out right and taste right. Getting the recipe right whether for a cake or lunar simulants is
critical."
For example, the new mare simulant will be enriched with ilmenite, a crystalline iron-titanium oxide.
Source materials used to produce the three simulants will potentially come from locations as
diverse as Montana, Arizona, Virginia, Florida, Hawaii, and even some international sites.
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 03:33 #86

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It is not impossible to fake photos,moon rocks and dust.And NASA wants to fake it openly
now.Well,sure it is long past time of the need for secrecy.Especially if it is understood that the
"Must Be" phase of the revelation of the method is well underway.

NASA Needs Fake Moondust
: For testing purposes, noting else will do. And supplies
of the real thing, brought back during the Apollo program, have run out. "We don't have enough
real moondust to go around," says Larry Taylor, director of Planetary Geosciences Institute at the
University of Tennessee in Knoxville. To run all the tests, "we need to make a well-qualified lunar
simulant."
An early substitute, JSC-1, was developed in 1993. It consisted of basaltic volcanic cinder cone
deposits from a quarry near Flagstaff, AZ. It's replacement, JSC-1a, comes in three different
varieties based on grain size: fine, moderate grain and coarse grain
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 03:40 #87

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Mimicking the Moon's Surface in the Basement
excerpt-
ScienceDaily (Aug. 7, 2010) — A team
of scientists used an ion beam in a basement room at Los Alamos National Laboratory to simulate
solar winds on the surface of the Moon. The table-top simulation helped confirm that the Moon is
inherently dry
.Volcanic ash: What it is and how it forms
Heiken, G.
1991-09-13
There are four basic eruption processes that produce volcanic ash: (1) decompression of rising
magma, gas bubble growth, and fragmentation of the foamy magma in the volcanic vent
(magmatic), (2) explosive mixing of magma with ground or surface water (hydrovolcanic), (3)
fragmentation of country rock during rapid expansion of steam and/or hot water (phreatic), and
(4) breakup of lava fragments during rapid transport from the vent. Variations in eruption style and
the characteristics of volcanic ashes produced during explosive eruptions depend on many factors,
including magmatic temperature, gas content, viscosity and crystal content of the magma before
eruption, the ratio of magma to ground or surface water, and physical properties of the rock
enclosing the vent. Volcanic ash is composed of rock and mineral fragments, and glass shards,
which is less than 2 mm in diameter. Glass shard shapes and sizes depend upon size and shape of
gas bubbles present within the magma immediately before eruption and the processes responsible
for fragmentation of the magma. Shards range from slightly curved, thin glass plates, which were
broken from large, thin-walled spherical bubble walls, to hollow needles broken from pumiceous
melts containing gas bubbles stretched by magma flow within the volcanic vent. Pumice fragments
make up the coarser-grained portions of the glass fraction. Particle sizes range from meters for
large blocks expelled near the volcanic vent to nanometers for fine ash and aerosol droplets within
well-dispersed eruption plumes.
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 03:45 #88

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List of rock type NASA could diddle with:

Igneous
A sample of andesite (dark groundmass) with amygdaloidal vesicules filled with zeolite. Diameter of
view is 8 cm.Andesite - an Intermediate volcanic rock
Anorthosite - an igneous ultramafic rock composed predominantly of plagioclase
Aplite - a very fine grained intrusive igneous rock
Basalt - a volcanic rock of mafic composition
Adakite - a class of basaltic rocks containing relatively small amounts of the trace elements
yttrium and ytterbium
Hawaiite - a class of basalts formed from Ocean Island (hot spot) magmatism
Basanite - a volcanic rock of mafic composition; essentially a silica undersaturated basalt
Boninite - a high-magnesian basalt dominated by pyroxene
Carbonatite - a rare igneous rock composed of >50% carbonate minerals
Charnockite - a rare type of granite containing pyroxene
Enderbite - a variety of charnockite
Dacite - a felsic to intermediate volcanic rock with high iron content
Diabase or dolerite - an intrusive mafic rock forming dykes or sills
Diorite - a coarse grained intermediate plutonic rock composed of plagioclase, pyroxene and/or
amphibole
Dunite - an ultramafic cumulate rock composed of olivine and accessories
Essexite - a silica undersaturated mafic plutonic rock (essentially a foid-bearing gabbro)
Foidolite - a plutonic igneous rock composed of >90% feldspathoid minerals
Gabbro - a coarse grained plutonic rock composed of pyroxene and plagioclase basically equivalent
to basalt
Granite - a coarse grained plutonic rock composed of orthoclase, plagioclase and quartz
Granodiorite - a granitic plutonic rock with plagioclase > orthoclase
Granophyre - a subvolcanic intrusive rock of granitic composition
Harzburgite - a variety of peridotite; an ultramafic cumulate rock
Hornblendite - a mafic or ultramafic cumulate rock dominated by >90% hornblende
Hyaloclastite - a volcanic rock composed primarily of glasses and glassy tuff
Icelandite - a volcanic rock
Ignimbrite - a fragmental volcanic rock
Ijolite - a very rare silica-undersaturated plutonic rock
Limey shale overlaid by limestone. Cumberland Plateau, TennesseeKimberlite - a rare ultramafic,
ultrapotassic volcanic rock and a source of diamonds
Komatiite - an ancient ultramafic volcanic rock
Lamproite - an ultrapotassic volcanic rock
Lamprophyre - an ultramafic, ultrapotassic intrusive rock dominated by mafic phenocrysts in a feldspar groundmass
Latite - a silica undersaturated form of andesite
Lherzolite - an ultramafic rock, essentially a peridotite
Monzogranite - a silica undersaturated granite with <5% normative quartz
Monzonite - a plutonic rock with <5% normative quartz
Nepheline syenite - a silica undersaturated plutonic rock with nepheline replacing orthoclase
Nephelinite - a silica undersaturated plutonic rock with >90% nepheline
Norite - a hypersthene bearing gabbro
Obsidian - a type of volcanic glass
Pegmatite - an igneous rock (or metamorphic rock) with giant sized crystals
Peridotite - a plutonic or cumulate ultramafic rock composed of >90% olivine
Phonolite - a silica undersaturated volcanic rock; essentially similar to nepheline syenite
Picrite - an olivine-bearing basalt
QuartzitePorphyry - a rock, usually granitic, with a porphyritic texture
Pumice - a fine grained, extremely vesicular volcanic rock
Pyroxenite - a coarse grained plutonic rock composed of >90% pyroxene
Quartz diorite - a diorite with >5% modal quartz
Quartz monzonite - an intermediate plutonic rock, essentially a monzonite with 5-10% modal
quartz
Rhyodacite - a felsic volcanic rock which is intermediate between a rhyolite and a dacite
Rhyolite - a felsic volcanic rock
Comendite - a peralkaline rhyolite
Pantellerite - an alkaline rhyolite-rhyodacite with amphibole phenocrysts
Scoria - an extremely vesicular mafic volcanic rock
Sovite - a coarse grained carbonatite rock
Syenite - a plutonic rock dominated by orthoclase feldspar; a type of granitoid
Tachylyte - essentially a basaltic glass
Tephrite - a silica undersaturated volcanic rock; can be a generic term
Tonalite - a plagioclase-dominant granitoid
Trachyandesite - an alkaline intermediate volcanic rock
Benmoreite - sodic trachyandesite
Basaltic trachyandesite
Mugearite - sodic basaltic trachyandesite
Shoshonite - potassic basaltic trachyandesite
Trachyte - a silica undersaturated volcanic rock; essentially a feldspathoid-bearing rhyolite
Troctolite - a plutonic ultramafic rock containing olivine, pyroxene and plagioclase
Trondhjemite - a form of tonalite where plagioclase-group feldspar is oligoclase
Tuff - a fine grained volcanic rock formed from volcanic ash
Websterite - a type of pyroxenite, composed of clinoproxene and orthopyroxene
Wehrlite - an ultramafic plutonic or cumulate rock, a type of peridotite, composed of olivine and
clinopyroxene
[edit] SedimentaryArgillite - a sedimentary rock composed primarily of clay-sized particles
Arkose - a sedimentary rock similar to sandstone
Banded iron formation - a fine grained chemical sedimentary rock composed of iron oxide minerals
Breccia - a sedimentary or tectonic rock composed of fragments of other, broken rocks
Bituminous coal seam in West VirginiaCataclasite - a rock formed by faulting
Chalk - a sedimentary rock composed primarily of coccolith fossils
Chert - a fine grained chemical sedimentary rock composed of silica
Claystone - a sedimentary rock formed from clay
Coal - a sedimentary rock formed from organic matter
Conglomerate - a sedimentary rock composed of large rounded fragments of other rocks
Diamictite - a poorly sorted conglomerate
Coquina - a sedimentary carbonate rock formed by accumulation of abundant shell fossils and fragments Dolomite crystals from Touissite, MoroccoDiatomite - a sedimentary rock formed from diatom fossils
Dolomite or dolostone - a carbonate rock composed of the mineral dolomite +/- calcite
Evaporite - a chemical sedimentary rock formed by accumulation of minerals after evaporation
Flint - a form of chert
Greywacke - an immature sandstone with quartz, feldspar and rock fragments within a clay matrix
Gritstone - essentially a coarse sandstone formed from small pebbles
Itacolumite - porous, yellow sandstone
Jaspillite - an iron-rich chemical sedimentary rock similar to chert or banded iron formation
Laterite - a residual sedimentary rock formed from a parent rock under tropical conditions
Lignite - a sedimentary rock composed of organic material; otherwise known as Brown Coal
Limestone - a sedimentary rock composed primarily of carbonate minerals
Marl - a limestone with a considerable proportion of silicate material
Mudstone - a sedimentary rock composed of clay and muds
Oil shale - a sedimentary rock composed dominantly of organic material
Oolite - a chemical sedimentary limestone
Sandstone - a clastic sedimentary rock defined by its grain size
Shale - a clastic sedimentary rock defined by its grain size
Siltstone - a clastic sedimentary rock defined by its grain size
Travertine - a sedimentary rock containing calcite and iron oxides
Turbidite (Gorgoglione Flysch), Miocene, South ItalyTurbidite - a particular sequence of
sedimentary rocks which form within the deep ocean environment
Wackestone - a matrix-supported carbonate sedimentary rock.
[edit] MetamorphicAnthracite - a type of coal
Amphibolite - a metamorphic rock composed primarily of amphibole
Blueschist - a metamorphic rock composed of sodic amphiboles with a distinct blue color
Phyllite
Banded gneiss with a dike of granite orthogneissEclogite - an ultra-high grade metamorphosed
basalt or gabbro; also a facies of metamorphic rocks
Gneiss - a coarse grained metamorphic rock
Gossan - the product of the weathering of a sulfide rock or ore body
Granulite - a high grade metamorphic rock formed from basalt; also a facies of metamorphic rocks
Greenschist - a generic term for a mafic metamorphic rock dominated by green amphiboles
Greenstone
Hornfels - a metamorphic rock formed by heating by an igneous rock
Knotenschiefer - a contact metamorphic slate formed at around 400ºC
MarbleMarble - a metamorphosed limestone
Migmatite - a high grade metamorphic rock verging upon melting into a magma
Mylonite - a metamorphic rock formed by shearing
Pelite - a metamorphic rock with a protolith of clay-rich (siltstone) sedimentary rock
Phyllite - a low grade metamorphic rock composed mostly of micaceous minerals
Psammite - a metamorphic rock with a protolith of quartz-rich (sandstone) sedimentary rock
Pseudotachylite - a glass formed by melting within a fault via friction
Quartzite - a metamorphosed sandstone typically composed of >95% quartz
Manhattan Schist, from Southeastern New YorkSchist - a low to medium grade metamorphic rock
Serpentinite - a metamorphosed ultramafic rock dominated by serpentine minerals
Skarn - a metasomatic rock
SlateSlate - a low grade metamorphic rock formed from shale or silts
Suevite - a rock formed by partial melting during a meteorite impact
Talc carbonate - a metamorphosed ultramafic rock with talc as an essential constituent; similar to
a serpentinite
Soapstone - essentially a talc schist
[edit] Specific varieties of rocksThe following terms are used to describe rocks which are not petrographically or genetically distinct, but are defined according to various other criteria; most
are specific classes of other rocks, or altered versions of existing rocks. Some archaic and
vernacular terms for rocks are also included.
Adamellite - a variety of quartz monzonite
Appinite - a group of varieties of lamprophyre, mostly rich in hornblende
Aphanite - an aphanitic felsic volcanic rock which confounds identification via optical means
Borolanite - a variety of nepheline syenite from Loch Borralan, Scotland
Blue Granite - essentially larvikite, a monzonite
Epidosite - a type of metasomatite; essentially altered basalt
Felsite - an aphanitic felsic volcanic rock which confounds identification via optical means
Flint - typically a form of chert, jasper, or tuff
Ganister - a Cornish term for a palaeosol formed on sandstone
Ijolite - a silica-undersaturated plutonic rock associated with nepheline syenites
Jadeitite - a very rare rock formed by concentration of jadeite pyroxene; a form of serpentinite
Jasperoid - a hematite-silica metasomatite analogous to a skarn
Kenyte - a variety of phonolite, first found on Mount Kenya
Vogesite - a variety of lamprophyre
Larvikite - a variety of monzonite with microperthitic ternary feldspars from Larvik, Norway
Litchfieldite - a metamorphosed nepheline syenite occurrence near Litchfield, Maine
Luxullianite - a tourmaline-bearing granite with a peculiar texture, occurring at Luxulyan, Cornwall,
England
Mangerite - a hypersthene-bearing monzonite
Minette - a variety of lamprophyre
Novaculite - a chert formation found in Oklahoma, Arkansas and Texas
Pyrolite - a chemical analogue considered to theoretically represent the earth's upper mantle
Rapakivi granite - a granite which exhibits the peculiar rapakivi texture
Rhomb porphyry - a type of latite with euhedral rhombic phenocrysts of feldspar
Shonkinite - an archaic and informal term used to describe melitilic and kalsititic rocks; often used
today
Taconite - a term for banded iron formation primarily used in the United States of America
Teschenite - essentially a silica undersaturated, analcime bearing gabbro
Theralite - essentially a nepheline gabbro
Variolite - devitrified glass
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 03:47 #89

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Lunar Dust Abrasion Simulation Capability Completed

www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/RT/2007/...RPY-gaier.html
NASA says they are ready to return to the moon : no later than 2020. :roll:
Last Edit: 23 Nov 2014 03:51 by zax.
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 03:51 #90

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PFIZIPFEI wrote:



step three to me looks rather like a



Let it rain, I hydroplane in the bank
Coming down with the Dow Jones
When the clouds come we gone, we Rocafella
We fly higher than weather
In G5's are better, You know me,
In anticipation, for precipitation. Stack chips for the rainy day....











VHT - Official supplier to NASA

He who is without oil shall throw the first rod.
- Compressions 13.3:1
Last Edit: 23 Nov 2014 06:02 by novum.
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 03:56 #91

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NASA wet their moonpants in 2011 over a speck of dust:

Shocking Find: Missing Moon Dust at Auction House
When investigators from both NASA and the U.S. attorney's office noticed moon dust listed for sale in St. Louis, they shut down the transaction with the cooperation of the auction house and the seller. The widow trying to sell the dust — her name was not released — said she didn't know where her late husband had purchased it. She "immediately and graciously agreed to relinquish it back to the American people," the U.S. attorney's office said.

The auction house had estimated its value at $1,000 to $1,500.

The kicker--
The story of the film canister and the stolen dust had been considered a hoax by some, U.S. attorney Rich Callahan said. This discovery, even a little speck, suggests the story is true — though you have to peer really, really close. "The truth is, it's not much to look at," said Callahan. "You have to believe it's there."
content.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,2079683,00.html
:cool:
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 04:03 #92

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Tidbits come out over the years in propaganda pieces--
Ultra-tiny dust grains can gum up the works of vital hardware on the Moon. And there's also a
possible risk to health from gulping in the lunar dust-a toxicological twist to "bad Moon rising."


www.space.com/3080-lunar-expl...t-dilemma.html

:D
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 04:05 #93

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Fake Dutch 'moon rock' revealed
Excerpt:
A treasured piece at the Dutch national museum - a supposed
moon rock from the first manned lunar landing - is nothing more
than petrified wood, curators say
.
newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/image...07855037-1.jpg

news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8226075.stm
Last Edit: 23 Nov 2014 04:06 by zax.
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 04:09 #94

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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 04:14 #95

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Mind controlled rhetoric--
AP/NASA
On July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin, the first men to
land on the moon, plant the U.S. flag on the lunar surface.
AP/NASA On July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin, the first
men to land on the moon, plant the U.S. flag on the lunar surface.
Well, this doesn't happen every day.
In yesterday's post, I talked about Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin's walk across the lunar surface
back in 1969 and wondered, how come they walked such a modest distance? Less than a hundred
yards from their lander?
Today Neil Armstrong wrote in to say, here are the reasons:
It was really, really hot on the moon, 200 degrees Fahrenheit. We needed protection.
We were wearing new-fangled, water-cooled uniforms and didn't know how long the coolant would
last.
We didn't know how far we could go in our space suits.
NASA wanted us to conduct our experiments in front of a fixed camera.
We [meaning Neil] cheated just a little, and very briefly bounded off to take pictures of some
interesting bedrock.
But basically, he says, we were part of a team and we were team players on a perilous, one-of-akind
journey. Improvisation was not really an option.

www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/20...irst-moon-walk


A tad more on mind control and Intel links
stargate.collection.free.fr/Elements/Search.php3
Last Edit: 23 Nov 2014 04:15 by zax.
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 04:22 #96

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Gee,even the deep space believing enthusiasts have a bit of common sense: :chuckle:
Forget Apollo, Antarctic Moon-rock better

Tuesday, 19 September 2006by Brad Hamilton
Cosmos Online
Excerpt:
A rare, golf-ball-sized lunar meteorite recently discovered in the snow fields of Antarctica can tell
us more about the Moon than samples taken directly from the lunar surface, according to
researchers.
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 04:26 #97

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Roughly 38 years after the event,researchers are learning that the moon rocks have
graphite beards.Folks you simply cannot make this kind of stuff up. :D
Graphite Whiskers Found in Apollo :roll: Moon Rocks
excerpt:
Long-held secrets continue to be unlocked from the Moon. Researchers taking a new look at a rock
brought back by the Apollo 17 mission have discovered graphite in the form of tiny whiskers within
the lunar sample. Just like the recent finding of water on the Moon, it was previously thought that
any carbon present in the Apollo rocks came from terrestrial contamination from the way the lunar
samples were collected, processed or stored
www.universetoday.com/67535/graphite-whiskers-found-in-apollo-moon-rocks/
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 04:31 #98

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I've known of NASA dicking around with remote viewing in the past,and the patents on
holographic technology as well
Below is a NASA link to an interesting pdf file :
“Development of Techniques to Enhance Man/Machine Communications"

ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19790003559.pdf
:cool:
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 04:33 #99

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The readers can take a look at this website dedicated to the artists who did the artwork for
mission patches for the wild and wooly space missions.
THe artists incllude:
Jean Bealieu (Apollo 14)
William Bradley (Gemini 7 and Apollo 8)
James Cooper (Apollo 11)
Victor Craft (Apollo 12)
Jerry Elmore (Apollo 15)
Frank Kelly Freas (Skylab 1)
Barbara Matelski (Apollo 16 and Skylab 3)
Robert McCall (Apollo 17)
Jean Pinataro (Apollo-Soyuz)
Gene Rickman (Apollo 8)
Allen Stevens (Apollo 1, 7,
genedorr.com/patches/Intro.html
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NASA : A Cosmic Cash Cow 23 Nov 2014 04:46 #100

  • zax
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The readers that have read the various space race or moon mission threads will recall how diverse forms of propaganda techniques are used in derailing threads[especially on DIF] ,and the same arguments used year in and year out to allegedly debunk all the anomalies and inconsistencies in the offiicial record.But as
time goes by more information comes to light exposing the scam,and many of the gems come from
officialdom,the authorities that the Believers respect and quote unless the information conflicts
with the official story.Much of the information exposing the Apollo storyline in the past 15-20 years
comes from varied sources....some mainstream,others in the alternative media....,not--- as often
claimed by debunkers---from conspiracy researchers out to make a buck off of videos and books.
So although every time a new thread pops up,and there is bemoaning and wailing and gnashing of
teeth over how it has all been debunked ,and how the official record must be once again defended
at all costs,it is clear to the discerning readers that the old issues being revisted can be seen in a
new light.
For example,we've seen how regolith and moon rocks can be faked on earth.And how officiadom
does not view the magnetosphere as being a cakewalk to simply "skirt around" and dance through.
The issue of ionizing radiation,SPEs,and more is still a problem not solved by NASA or scientific
officialdom with regards to deep space travel,and not just in regards to long term adventures in
deep space,but even short term trips to the moon.

Here's a 21st century report on radiation protection studies::
NCRP Report No. 153, Information Needed to Make Radiation Protection Recommendations[
for Space Missions Beyond Low-Earth Orbit


National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) astronauts on exploration missions of long
duration beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO) (e.g., Mars) face exposures to ionizing radiation levels that
may exceed those routinely received by terrestrial radiation workers, or even those faced by
crews in near-Earth spacecraft, such as the Space Transport Shuttle (STS) and International
Space Station (ISS). Radiation fields encountered include the galactic cosmic radiation
background, sporadic solar-particle events, energetic protons and electrons during
traversals of the Van Allen inner and outer radiation belts,
and exposure to possible onboard
radioactive sources used for power generation, propulsion, medical testing, and instrument
calibration.
The acceptable levels of risk for space exploration beyond LEO have not been defined at this time
and need to be dealt with before sending manned missions to the moon or to deep space such
as a mission to Mars. In response to this need the National Council on Radiation Protection and
Measurements (NCRP) has released Report No. 153, Information Needed to Make Radiation
Protection Recommendations for Space Missions Beyond Low-Earth Orbit.
This Report is a continuation of NCRP Report No. 132, Radiation Protection Guidance for Activities
in Low-Earth Orbit, which provided guidance on limitation of exposure to ionizing radiation in LEO as
encountered by personnel on STS and ISS missions. Report No. 153 addresses space radiation
physics and transport, dosimetry, biology, risk assessment methodology, and identifies and
describes major scientific information that is needed by NASA to make radiation protection
recommendations for space missions beyond LEO. Current space radiation guidelines pertain only to
missions in LEO and are not considered relevant for missions beyond LEO.
Note that contrary to the debunkers claims of this all being about missions to Mars and only long
duration missions,such is not the case.

Then we read this:


SC 1-15: Radiation Protection and Science Goals for Short-Term Lunar Missions
excerpt:
The Committee is preparing a commentary on astronaut safety in future short-term missions to the
moon. The major issues being addressed in this commentary are: (1) short-term and career dose
limits for astronauts in lunar missions and (2) applications of ALARA in shielding designs for Earthto-
moon transfer vehicles, lunar habitats, and extravehicular activities in space or on the moon’s
surface. The Committee held its first meeting on March 17-18, 2005 and a second meeting on May
14-15, 2005, in conjunction with a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
bioeffects contractors meeting in Port Jefferson, Long Island, New York. A third meeting of the
Committee was held on November 17-18, 2005. At this meeting a detailed outline of the NCRP
commentary on the NASA radiation safety plan for astronauts in lunar missions was developed.
www.ncrponline.org/Publications/Press_Releases/153press.html

Here we are all these decades after the alleged missions to the moon,and it is coming out from
officialdom that there needs to be a bunch of work on this deadly radiation and other hazards out
there beyond LEO.And tens of millions of dollars to do so as noted earlier in the thread.
Also interesting to note,contrary to the contention of the Believers is that there is mention by
officiadom of traversing through the inner VA Belts,not just doing the old "skirting the outer edges
and doing so quickly" deal.Of course,this is all in the researching phase,and one day it is hoped
that man can get a spacecraft beyond LEO,but that is not to come to mind when discussing the
past feats of wonder by NASA in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
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