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TOPIC: Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism?

Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 03 Dec 2019 02:42 #1

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There are quite a few ancient myths that seem to parallel Christian beliefs. Here is one of my favorites, the Horus-Osirus parallel. The simuliarities are to many to ignore.

It's important to know, the Horus-Osirus myth existed a thousand years before the advent of Christianity. So one cannot make a case for Paganism borrowing from Christianity.

Here is a list of, "simularities" between Horus-Ositus mythology and Christianity, according to, Tom Harpur, author of, 'the Pagan Christ'...

1...Horus was baptized in the River Eridanus (Jordan) by a god figure named Anup the Baptizer (John the Baptist) who was later decaptitated.

2...Like Jesus, Horus had no history between the ages of 12 and 30

3......Horus walked on water, cast out demons, and healed the sick

4....Horus was transfigured on a mountain; Jesus took Peter, James and John ….

5.....Horus delivered a ‘Sermon on the Mount” and his followers faithfully recounted the sayings of Iusa

6...Horus was crucified between 2 thieves, buried in a tomb, and resurrected. His personal epithet was Iusa or Iusu, the “ever-becoming son” of Ptah or the Father. Significantly Horus was called the KRST or “Anointed One’ from a word that was inscribed or painted on the lid of a mummy’s coffin millennia before Christianity duplicated the story

7....Horus was the Good Shepherd, the lamb of God, the bread of life, the son of man, the Word, and the fisher

8....Horus was not just the path to heaven but the way by which the dead travel out of the sepulchre. He was the god whose name was written as the “road to salvation” He was thus the “way, the truth, the life”./center]

Tom further says....

'The truth is that the Gospels are indeed the old manuscripts of the dramaticized rituals of the incarnation and resurrection of the sun god Osiris/Horus, rituals that were first Egyptian, later Gnostic and Hellenic, then Hebrew, and finally adopted ignorantly by the Christian movement and transferred to the arena of history'


considerthegospel.org/2014/03/04/son-of-god-controversy-was-jesus-developed-from-egyptian-osiris-isis-horus-myth/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMImIni37CY5gIVhqDsCh...TEAAYASAAEgKzhfD_BwE
Birth is not a beginning; death is not an end. There is existence without limitation; there is continuity without a starting point.” ~ Chuang Tzu
Last Edit: 03 Dec 2019 02:44 by peacenik.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 03 Dec 2019 03:42 #2

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There's also quite a few similarities in the stories of Moses and Jewsus no that I'm going to list them right now....

... not sure if anyone else here has thought of this but what language would god have spoken to Moses in, bearing in mind that Moses was brought up (according to the narrative) speaking Egyptian which is a form of Arabic... what language would the sacred tables have been written in?

Anyway back on topic, 'Christmas and Easter were pagan traits and Christianity has not so much borrowed but stolen those European traditions, St Nicholas didn't exist unless you want to believe that someone found chopped up bodies stuffed in barrels, emptied the barrels out, put the bodies back together, and brought the victims back to life......lol.... St Nick is the shill who was used to steal Yule.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 03 Dec 2019 14:08 #3

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peacenik wrote:
There are quite a few ancient myths that seem to parallel Christian beliefs. Here is one of my favorites, the Horus-Osirus parallel. The simuliarities are to many to ignore.

It's important to know, the Horus-Osirus myth existed a thousand years before the advent of Christianity. So one cannot make a case for Paganism borrowing from Christianity.

Here is a list of, "simularities" between Horus-Ositus mythology and Christianity, according to, Tom Harpur, author of, 'the Pagan Christ'...

1...Horus was baptized in the River Eridanus (Jordan) by a god figure named Anup the Baptizer (John the Baptist) who was later decaptitated.

2...Like Jesus, Horus had no history between the ages of 12 and 30

3......Horus walked on water, cast out demons, and healed the sick

4....Horus was transfigured on a mountain; Jesus took Peter, James and John ….

5.....Horus delivered a ‘Sermon on the Mount” and his followers faithfully recounted the sayings of Iusa

6...Horus was crucified between 2 thieves, buried in a tomb, and resurrected. His personal epithet was Iusa or Iusu, the “ever-becoming son” of Ptah or the Father. Significantly Horus was called the KRST or “Anointed One’ from a word that was inscribed or painted on the lid of a mummy’s coffin millennia before Christianity duplicated the story

7....Horus was the Good Shepherd, the lamb of God, the bread of life, the son of man, the Word, and the fisher

8....Horus was not just the path to heaven but the way by which the dead travel out of the sepulchre. He was the god whose name was written as the “road to salvation” He was thus the “way, the truth, the life”./center]

Tom further says....

'The truth is that the Gospels are indeed the old manuscripts of the dramaticized rituals of the incarnation and resurrection of the sun god Osiris/Horus, rituals that were first Egyptian, later Gnostic and Hellenic, then Hebrew, and finally adopted ignorantly by the Christian movement and transferred to the arena of history'


considerthegospel.org/2014/03/04/son-of-god-controversy-was-jesus-developed-from-egyptian-osiris-isis-horus-myth/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMImIni37CY5gIVhqDsCh...TEAAYASAAEgKzhfD_BwE


All of what you have just stated is bullshit.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 03 Dec 2019 14:10 #4

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strangenotions.com/horus-manure/

Often Christians are not prepared for this type of encounter, and some are even swayed by this line of argumentation. Maher’s tirade provides a good summary of the claims, so let’s deconstruct it, one line at a time.

Written in 1280 BC, the Book of the Dead describes a God, Horus.
In fact, there are many “books of the dead.” But there is no single, official Book of the Dead. The books are collections of ancient Egyptian spells that were believed to help the deceased on their journey to the afterlife. The title Book of the Dead comes from an Arabic label referring to the fact that the books were mostly found with mummies (cf. The Oxford Essential Guide to Egyptian Mythology, “Funerary Literature”). Some of these texts contain vignettes depicting the god Horus, but they don’t tell us much about him.

Our information about Horus comes from a variety of archaeological sources. What we do know from the most recent scholarship on the subject is that there were many variations of the story, each of them popularized at different times and places throughout the 5,000-year span of ancient Egyptian history. Egyptologists recognize the possibility that these differences may have been understood as aspects or facets of the same divine persona, but they nevertheless refer to them as distinct Horus-gods (cf. The Oxford Essential Guide to Egyptian Mythology, “Horus”).

Part of the problem with the “Jesus is Horus” claim is that in order to find items that even partially fit the life story of Jesus, advocates of the view must cherry-pick bits of myth from different epochs of Egyptian history. This is possible today because modern archaeology has given us extensive knowledge of Egypt’s religious beliefs and how they changed over time, making it possible to cite one detail from this version of a story and another from that.

But the early Christians, even if they had wanted to base the Gospels on the Horus myths, would have had no way to do so. They might have known what was believed about Horus in the Egypt of their day, but they would have had no access to the endless variations of the stories that laid buried in the sands until archaeologists started digging them up in the 1800s.

Another part of the problem is that the claimed parallels between Jesus and Horus contain half-truths, distortions, and flat-out falsehoods. For example...

Horus is the son of the god Osiris, born to a virgin mother.
The mother of Horus was believed to be the goddess Isis. Her husband, the god Osiris, was killed by his enemy Seth, the god of the desert, and later dismembered. Isis managed to retrieve all of Osiris’s body parts except for his phallus, which was thrown into the Nile and eaten by catfish. (I’m not making this up). Isis used her goddess powers to temporarily resurrect Osiris and fashion a golden phallus. She was then impregnated, and Horus was conceived. However this story may be classified, it is not a virgin birth.

He was baptized in a river by Anup the Baptizer, who was later beheaded.
There is no character named Anup the Baptizer in ancient Egyptian mythology. This is the concoction of a 19th-century English poet and amateur Egyptologist by the name of Gerald Massey (see sidebar 2 below). Massey is the author of several books on the subject of Egyptology; however, professional Egyptologists have largely ignored his work. In fact, his writing is held in such low regard in archaeological circles that it is difficult to find references to him in reputable modern publications.

In the book Christ in Egypt: The Horus-Jesus Connection (Stellar House Publishing, 2009), author D. M. Murdoch, drawing heavily from Gerald Massey, identifies “Anup the Baptizer” as the Egyptian god Anubis. Murdoch then attempts to illustrate parallels between Anubis and John the Baptist.

Some evidence exists in Egyptian tomb paintings and sculptures to support the idea that a ritual washing was done during the coronation of Pharaohs, but it is always depicted as having been done by the gods. This indicates that it may have been understood as a spiritual event that likely never happened in reality (cf. Alan Gardiner, “The Baptism of Pharaoh,” The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, vol. 36). This happened only to kings (if it happened to them at all), and one searches in vain to find depictions of Horus being ritually washed by Anubis.

Like Jesus, Horus was tempted while alone in the desert.
The companion guide to the film Zeitgeist outlines the basis for this claim by explaining, “As does Satan with Jesus, Set (aka Seth) attempts to kill Horus. Set is the ‘god of the desert’ who battles Horus, while Jesus is tempted in the desert by Satan” (p. 23).

Doing battle with the “god of the desert” is not the same as being tempted while alone in the desert; and according to the Gospel accounts, Satan did not attempt to kill Jesus there (cf. Matt. 4, Mark 1:12-13, Luke 4:1-13).

The relationship between Horus and Seth in the ancient Egyptian religion was quite different than the relationship between Jesus and Satan. While Seth and Horus were often at odds with each other, it was believed that their reconciliation was what allowed the pharaohs to rule over a unified country. It was believed that the pharaoh was a “Horus reconciled to Seth, or a gentleman in whom the spirit of disorder had been integrated” (The Oxford Guide to Egyptian Mythology, “Seth”). In stark contrast, there is never any reconciliation between Jesus and Satan in Scripture.

Healed the sick, the blind, cast out demons, and walked on water.
The Metternich Stella, a monument from the 4th century B.C., tells a story in which Horus is poisoned by Seth and brought back to life by the god Thoth at the request of his mother, Isis. The ancient Egyptians used the spell described on this monument to cure people. It was believed that the spirit of Horus would dwell within the sick, and they would be cured the same way he was. This spiritual indwelling is a far cry from the physical healing ministry of Christ. Horus did not travel the countryside laying his hands on sick people and restoring them to health.

He raised Asar from the dead. “Asar” translates to “Lazarus.”
The name Osirus is a Greek transliteration of the Egyptian name Asar. As I mentioned earlier, Osirus is the father of Horus, and, according to the myth, he was killed by Seth and briefly brought back to life by Isis in order to conceive Horus. It was not Horus who raised “Asar” from the dead. It was his mother.

The name Lazarus is actually derived from the Hebrew word Eleazar meaning “God has helped.” This name was common among the Jews of Jesus’ time. In fact, two figures in the New Testament bear this name (cf. John 11, Luke 16:19-31).

Oh, yeah, he also had twelve disciples.
Again, this claim finds its origin in the work of Gerald Massey (Ancient Egypt: The Light of the World, book 12), which points to a mural depicting “the twelve who reap the harvest.” But Horus does not appear in the mural.

In the various Horus myths, there are indications of the four “Sons of Horus,” or six semi-gods, who followed him, and at times there were various numbers of human followers, but they never add up to twelve. Only Massey arrives at this number, and he does so only by referencing the mural with no Horus on it.

Yes, Horus was crucified first.
In many of the books and on the websites that attempt to make this connection, it is often pointed out that there are several ancient depictions of Horus standing with his arms spread in cruciform. One can only answer this with a heartfelt “So what?” A depiction of a person standing with his arms spread is not unusual, nor is it evidence that the story of a crucified savior predates that of Jesus Christ.

We do have extensive evidence from extra-biblical sources that the Romans around the time of Christ practiced crucifixion as a form of capital punishment. Not only that, but we have in the Bible actual eyewitness accounts of Jesus’ crucifixion. On the other hand, there is no historical evidence at all to suggest that the ancient Egyptians made use of this type of punishment.

And after three days, two women announced Horus, the savior of humanity, had been resurrected.
As I explained before, the story of the child Horus dying and being brought back to life is described on the Metternich Stella, which in no way resembles the sacrificial death of Jesus. Christ did not die as a child, only to be brought back to life because his grieving mother went to the animal-headed god of magic.

The mythology surrounding Horus is closely tied with the pharaohs, because they were believed to be Horus in life and Osirus in death. With the succession of pharaohs over the centuries came new variations on the myth. Sometimes Horus was believed to be the god of the sky, and at other times he was believed to be the god of war, at other times both; but he was never described as a “savior of humanity.”

Combating the never-ending list of parallels
If you do an Internet search on this subject, you will come across lists of supposed parallels between Jesus and Horus that are much longer than Bill Maher’s filmic litany. What they all have in common is that they do not cite their sources.

Should you encounter people who try to challenge you with these claims, ask them to explain where it is they got their information. Many times you will find that they originate with Gerald Massey or one of his contemporaries. Sometimes they have been repeated and expanded on by others. But these claims have little or no connection to the facts.

You should challenge the person making the claim to produce a primary source or a statement from a scholarly secondary source that has a footnote that can be checked. Then make sure the sources being quoted come from scholars with a Ph.D. in a relevant field, such as a person who teaches Egyptology at the university level.

Due to the mass of misinformation on the Internet and in print on this subject, it is important to respond to these claims using credible sources. Fortunately, there are many good books on Egypt and Egyptology in print. But there are also bad ones, so make sure to verify the author’s credentials before purchasing them.

The study of ancient Egypt has come a long way since its beginning in the 1800s, and new discoveries are being made even today that improve upon our understanding of the subject. It’s safe to say they will do nothing to bolster the alleged Jesus-Horus connection.

The Horus mythology developed over a period of 5,000 years, and as a result it can be a complex subject to tackle. But you don’t have to be an Egyptologist to answer all of these claims. You just need to know where to look for the answers—and to be aware of the claims’ flawed sources.



Appendix 1:
A brief history of modern Egyptology
Rosetta StoneModern Egyptology really begins with the French campaign in Egypt and Syria initiated by Napoleon Bonaparte around 1798. Among other things, the French established a scientific exploration of the region.

In 1799, a soldier named Pierre-Francois Bouchard discovered the Rosetta Stone, which contained a bilingual text that eventually led to the translation of Egyptian hieroglyphs. Prior to this, our knowledge of ancient Egypt’s 5,000-year history was limited to what was known through the writings of pre-Christian Greek historians such as Herodotus and Strabo.

The discovery of the Rosetta Stone led to a renewed interest by the Europeans in all things ancient Egypt, commonly referred to now as “Egyptomania.” It was not until nearly a century later that Egyptology as an academic discipline began to come into its own. Since that time, we have a much better understanding of ancient Egyptian history and culture.

Appendix 2:
Massey scholarship

Gerald MasseyWhen researching the supposed Egyptian influences on Christianity, inevitably one comes across the name Gerald Massey. Massey was an English poet and amateur Egyptologist who lived from 1828 to 1907. He is the author of three books on the subject: The Book of the Beginnings, The Natural Genesis, and Ancient Egypt: The Light of the World. Because his books represent some of the earliest attempts to draw comparisons between the Christian and Egyptian religions, other writers attempting to draw these comparisons frequently cite them.

One recent example is the book Christ in Egypt; The Horus-Jesus Connection by D.M. Murdoch. In it the author states: “This present analysis of the claims regarding the correspondences between the Egyptian and Christian religions is not dependent on Massey’s work for the most part,” yet she devotes an entire chapter of the book to defending the authenticity of Massey’s scholarship (something she does not feel called to do for anyone else she quotes in her book) and thereafter adopting many of the same comparisons.

Critics of Massey’s work often point out that he had no formal education in the area of Egyptology. While this is a valid criticism, I think it is also important to point out that the study of ancient Egyptian religion has advanced far beyond what was known in the 19th century. Not only is much of Massey’s scholarship built on wild speculation, it is also the product of an academic discipline still in its infancy.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 03 Dec 2019 15:47 #5

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Oh, yeah, he also had twelve disciples.
Again, this claim finds its origin in the work of Gerald Massey (Ancient Egypt: The Light of the World, book 12), which points to a mural depicting “the twelve who reap the harvest.” But Horus does not appear in the mural.

Bullshit ^



Fig. 1: “The Lower Register starts with the hawk-headed Horus, seated on a throne and holding Was and Ankh, with the sun disc on his head. Facing him are twelve gods with stars on their heads.”- Dr. Erik Hornung & Dr. Theodor Abt.[1] From the Lower Register of the 7th Hour of the Amduat as seen in the tomb of Thutmose III, KV34, 15th century BC
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 03 Dec 2019 16:23 #6

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Because there are 12 Hours in the day.... Horus...or 'Heru' (Fr. Heure) is where we derive the word for Hour.

The extract you showed comes from the Book of the Dead which is divided into HOURS.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 03 Dec 2019 16:35 #7

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He was baptized in a river by Anup the Baptizer, who was later beheaded.
There is no character named Anup the Baptizer in ancient Egyptian mythology. This is the concoction of a 19th-century English poet and amateur Egyptologist by the name of Gerald Massey (see sidebar 2 below). Massey is the author of several books on the subject of Egyptology; however, professional Egyptologists have largely ignored his work. In fact, his writing is held in such low regard in archaeological circles that it is difficult to find references to him in reputable modern publications.

True, the story has been mixed up with the anointment of Osiris by Anubis

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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 03 Dec 2019 16:39 #8

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Truthspoon wrote:
Because there are 12 Hours in the day.... Horus...or 'Heru' (Fr. Heure) is where we derive the word for Hour.

The extract you showed comes from the Book of the Dead which is divided into HOURS.

12 subservient characters.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 03 Dec 2019 16:50 #9

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Horus is the son of the god Osiris, born to a virgin mother.
The mother of Horus was believed to be the goddess Isis. Her husband, the god Osiris, was killed by his enemy Seth, the god of the desert, and later dismembered. Isis managed to retrieve all of Osiris’s body parts except for his phallus, which was thrown into the Nile and eaten by catfish. (I’m not making this up). Isis used her goddess powers to temporarily resurrect Osiris and fashion a golden phallus. She was then impregnated, and Horus was conceived. However this story may be classified, it is not a virgin birth.

Maybe the golden phallus (dildo) makes ISIS not a virgin but biologically speaking, Horus has been born in this situation without using Osiris's 'real' (dismembered/lost) penis but rather a metal replacement, so as far as semen is concerned she;s a virgin, thus like Jesus, Horus was born without proper biological pregnancy.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 03 Dec 2019 17:09 #10

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The Pyramid Texts speak of “the great virgin” (hwn.t wr.t) three times (682c, 728a, 2002a…); she is anonymous, appears as the protectress of the king, and is explicitly called his mother once (809c). It is interesting that Isis is addresseed as hwn.t in a sarcophagus oracle that deals with her mysterious pregnancy. In a text in the Abydos Temple of Seti I, Isis herself declares: “I am the great virgin.”…



freethoughtnation.com/isis-is-a-virgin-mother/
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 03 Dec 2019 20:18 #11

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Truthspoon and Ugh are utterly hopeless. They want the option of making ridiculus claims about their so-called savior and expect to never be called on it.

All Ugh can do is throw biblical quotes at you and post pictures of jesus. Like that's supposed to satisfy your inquiry.

I've read some of the material on truthspoon's website. I was led to believe that truthspoon had a understanding of the conspiracy against Man's spiritual existence. but, it looks like I was wrong about that?

Here's a bottom line to cut through all the verbiage on this subject. If you do not have a personal relationship with God, you are fucked.

Simple as that!

Now you can on and on about how great jesus is, about how he can walk on water, heal the sick, make blind people see, ad nauseam. You can worship your idol until the cows come home, it means NOTHING if you do not have a personal relationship God.
Birth is not a beginning; death is not an end. There is existence without limitation; there is continuity without a starting point.” ~ Chuang Tzu
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 03 Dec 2019 23:21 #12

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As far as I can work out their shenannigains , they want jewsus to save them from god :dunno:
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 04 Dec 2019 02:43 #13

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peacenik wrote:
Truthspoon and Ugh are utterly hopeless. They want the option of making ridiculus claims about their so-called savior and expect to never be called on it.

All Ugh can do is throw biblical quotes at you and post pictures of jesus. Like that's supposed to satisfy your quest for knowledge.

I've read some of the material on truthspoon's website. I was led to believe that truthspoon had a understanding of the conspiracy against Man's spiritual existence. but, it looks like I was wrong about that. Truthspoon appears more interested in being, comfortably numb than he is to look into any kind of investigation of what is actually keeping Man down.

Here's a bottom line to cut through all the verbiage on this subject. If you do not have a personal relationship with God, you are fucked.

Simple as that!

Now you can on and on about how great jesus is, about how he can walk on water, heal the sick, make blind people see, ad nauseam. You can worship your idol until the cows come home, it means NOTHING if you do not have a personal relationship God.


Cant get much more pagan than Jesus riding a Harley
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 04 Dec 2019 02:53 #14

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Frothy wrote:
As far as I can work out their shenannigains , they want jewsus to save them from god :dunno:

Part of the problem is, they are both, Fundies.

Christian Fundamentalists think there is only one kind of Christianity, and by extension, only one way to look at it (their way).

How about all those Christians who were put to death for being "heretics". All those Christians slaughtered by the church for merely disagreeing with the church. They were Christians to you know. They are, after all, part of the Christian experience. They to, need a voice in defining what "Christianity" is?

The problem with Christianity is, it chooses Fundamentalism at the expense of all other Christianity. Hence, the Christianity of today is not the same Christianity of old.

Being a Christian does NOT mean you have to be Fundamentalist.
Birth is not a beginning; death is not an end. There is existence without limitation; there is continuity without a starting point.” ~ Chuang Tzu
Last Edit: 04 Dec 2019 03:01 by peacenik.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 04 Dec 2019 09:09 #15

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Once I saw this guy on a bridge about to jump. I said, "Don't do it!" He said, "Nobody loves me." I said, "God loves you. Do you believe in God?"

He said, "Yes." I said, "Are you a Christian or a Jew?" He said, "A Christian." I said, "Me, too! Protestant or Catholic?" He said, "Protestant." I said, "Me, too! What franchise?" He said, "Baptist." I said, "Me, too! Northern Baptist or Southern Baptist?" He said, "Northern Baptist." I said, "Me, too! Northern Conservative Baptist or Northern Liberal Baptist?"

He said, "Northern Conservative Baptist." I said, "Me, too! Northern Conservative Baptist Great Lakes Region, or Northern Conservative Baptist Eastern Region?" He said, "Northern Conservative Baptist Great Lakes Region." I said, "Me, too!"

Northern Conservative†Baptist Great Lakes Region Council of 1879, or Northern Conservative Baptist Great Lakes Region Council of 1912?" He said, "Northern Conservative Baptist Great Lakes Region Council of 1912." I said, "Die, heretic!" And I pushed him over.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 04 Dec 2019 09:55 #16

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peacenik wrote:
Truthspoon and Ugh are utterly hopeless.

Because I don't want to share your plate of bullshit?

I'm under no obligation to believe any old shit that you post.... and you start acting butt-hurt because I don't buy it?

For a Nam veteran you sure act like a pussy.

Mate, I've done all sorts of research on all sorts of topics from ancient history to quantum physics.

I think and work things out for myself. I've studied the Egyptian Book of the Dead and can tell you that 99 percent of this Jesus is Horus stuff is malicious made up horseshit. No serious scholar or historian entertains it, so why do you?

You're the one without hope from where I'm sitting.

I had a great deal of respect for you.....but you're throwing that away and making yourself look like a fool right now.
Last Edit: 04 Dec 2019 10:01 by Truthspoon.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 04 Dec 2019 10:07 #17

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Truthspoon
No serious scholar or historian entertains it, so why do you?

No series scholar or historian entertains that the NT was based from the words of a son of god in reality, so why do you?
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Last Edit: 04 Dec 2019 10:12 by Frothy.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 04 Dec 2019 10:17 #18

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Frothy wrote:
The Pyramid Texts speak of “the great virgin” (hwn.t wr.t) three times (682c, 728a, 2002a…); she is anonymous, appears as the protectress of the king, and is explicitly called his mother once (809c). It is interesting that Isis is addresseed as hwn.t in a sarcophagus oracle that deals with her mysterious pregnancy. In a text in the Abydos Temple of Seti I, Isis herself declares: “I am the great virgin.”…



freethoughtnation.com/isis-is-a-virgin-mother/

hwn.t or Hewnet doesn't mean 'Virgin' as in not having had sexual relations, it means 'consecrated to God'.

beliefmap.org/jesus-existed/myth-copy/horus/virgin-born
A second virginity?
Mythicist D.M. Murdock (Acharya S.) attempts to establish a parallel between Jesus and Horus by speaking of Horus's mother, Isis, being a virgin. This article assesses whether Isis did in fact conceive of Horus by sex. In response to the evidence that Horus was so conceived, Murdock has rebutted that Isis could have what she calls a “born again virginity,” wherein Isis may be understood as a virgin despite having conceived of Horus through sex (citing Philo).1 She is a “perpetual virgin” regardless of having sex.

By way of response however…
• …this misreads Philo.2
• …such obscure cherry-picking makes her thesis unfalsifiable.
• …the topic is whether Horus was virgin-born like Jesus, and he wasn't.

Acharya states that Philo called Sarah a virgin again, sharing this quote from Book 5: “will not converse with Sarah before all the habits, such as other women have, have left her, and till she has returned into the class of pure virgins.” By way of response, however, Philo is speaking very poetically. Here is the context Acharya leaves out: "for they who live with these men are in name indeed wives, but in fact virtues. Sarah is princess and guide, Rebecca is perseverance in what is good; Leah again is virtue...” (Book 5. 12:41), then in this allegorical sense, Philo says God calls us as "thy house, and thy father, and the husband of thy Virginity". By this, Philo says “God is both a house, the incorporeal abode of incorporeal ideas” … “sowing for the race of mankind the seed of happiness in good and virgin soil.” This is highly poetic language that is not teaching that Sarah became a virgin again, but rather that in this quasi virtue talk God must expunge from us all vices to make us more virgin-like. [Philo Book 5. 14:50]
“NO, AFTER ALL…
LEGEND OF THE BIRTH OF HORUS SAYS “BY SEX”
An Ancient pyramid text dated 2450-2140 B.C.

Thy sister Isis cometh to thee rejoicing in her love for thee. Thou hast union with her, thy seed entereth her. She conceiveth in the form of the star Septet (Sothis). Horus-Sept issueth from thee in the form of Horus, dweller in the star Septet. [”V. Legend of the birth of Horus, son of Isis and Osiris.”, in Legends of the Gods: The Egyptian Texts, ed with Trans. by Budge (1912), 179.]

THE NARRATIVE OF ISIS SAYS “BY SEX”
“I am Isis, who conceived a child by her husband, and she became heavy with Horus, the divine [child]. I gave birth to Horus, the son of Osiris, in a nest of papyrus plants.” [“II. The Narrative of Isis” in Legends of the Gods: The Egyptian Texts, ed with Trans. by Budge (1912).]

HYMN TO OSIRIS (ON THE STELA LOUVRE C 286) SAYS “BY SEX”
Isis the powerful, protectress of her brother, who sought him tirelessly,
who traversed this land in mourning and did not rest until she found him;
who gave him shade with her feathers and air with her wings;
who cried out, the mourning woman of her brother
who summoned dancers for the Weary of Heart;

who took in his seed and created the heir,
who suckled the child in solitude, no one knew where,
who brought him, when his arm was strong,
into the hall of Geb -- the Ennead rejoiced:

“Welcome, Osiris' son, Horus, stout of heart, justified, son of Isis, heir of Osiris.”

[Jan Assmann, Death and Salvation in Ancient Egypt (Cornell University Press, 2001), 24-25.]

PYRAMID TEXTS (SPELL 366:632A-633B/T 198) SAYS “BY SEX”
“Isis comes to you, rejoicing for love of you, that her seed might issue into her, it being sharp as Sothis. Horus, the sharp one, who comes forth from you in his name ‘Horus, who is in Sothis,’ may it be well with you through him in your name “Spirit in the dndrw-barque.” Horus has protected you in his name ‘Horus protector of his father.’” [Jan Assmann, Death and Salvation in Ancient Egypt (Cornell University Press, 2001
Last Edit: 04 Dec 2019 10:22 by Truthspoon.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 04 Dec 2019 10:23 #19

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Wrong hwn.t means maiden.

www.medu.ipetisut.com/index.php?og=maiden

maiden = virgin.
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Did Christianity Borrow From Paganism? 04 Dec 2019 10:25 #20

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This is the thing about Christians, they won't even stop at altering the religions of others to accommodate their own.
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