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TOPIC: Plane Spotting

Plane Spotting 17 Feb 2017 01:24 #1

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Plane Spotting 17 Feb 2017 02:00 #2

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Maho Beach, Sint Maarten, Dutch Antilles :thumbup:
The Only Limit is Your Own Imagination
A truth seeker is someone who dares to wade through thick series of toxic smoke screens and tries not to inhale - Gaia
"What do you call 'genius'?" "Well, seeing things others don't see. Or rather the invisible links between things."
- Vladimir Nabokov (1938)
"The silence of conspiracy. Slaughtered on the altar of apathy." - Lords of the New Church (1982)
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Plane Spotting 18 Feb 2017 02:47 #3

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^^^ that is insane.. perhaps I think so even more because I've watched every episode of the Mayday Air Crash Investigations series on youtube.





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Plane Spotting 01 Apr 2017 05:01 #4

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Published on Jan 4, 2017
Air crash Investigation of Continental 3407 Flying Cheap.

Last Edit: 01 Apr 2017 05:02 by annabelle.
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Plane Spotting 01 Apr 2017 18:15 #5

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The best Aircraft I've flown in is an RAF Lockheed Tristar. Great aircraft in their day. Very roomy and comfortable inside too! Just listen to those 3 Rolls-Royce engines on take off. :cool:



The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. – Marcus Aurelius
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Plane Spotting 01 Apr 2017 18:22 #6

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flown in one of these too. Which have the seats facing backwards inside. Quite weird on take off, as you're being pulled forwards away from the seat.



The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. – Marcus Aurelius
Last Edit: 02 Apr 2017 02:22 by Return of Zorro.
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Plane Spotting 01 Apr 2017 18:42 #7

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The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. – Marcus Aurelius
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Plane Spotting 01 Apr 2017 22:25 #8

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The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. – Marcus Aurelius
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Plane Spotting 01 Apr 2017 22:34 #9

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The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. – Marcus Aurelius
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Plane Spotting 03 Apr 2017 22:38 #10

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I would suggest when booking a flight to ask for an aisle seat (quicker get away) over the wings, which is the structurally strongest area of the plane as far as passenger seats go, also keep note of the emergency exits and in case of emergency landing create as close to a cocoon as possible around you ie.. if you are wearing a jacket then pull it up around your entire head and upper body (in brace position), use airline blanket as well for cocoon if possible (to protect from potential fire).

Even on safe landing in an 'emergency' there is still very much danger from fire after having landed and coming to a full stop. Be prepared to open emergency door yourself, in case of fire you may only have about 90-120 seconds to get out of the air craft before it is too late. The first thing to focus on upon complete landing though is undoing seat belt, many panic in smoke and are unable to undo the seat belt due to panic.

Also if there is an emergency landing on water, DO NOT inflate life vests until you are OUT of the airplane. Numerous people have died because they inflated their life vests while in the airplane. When the plane fills up with water, people with already inflated life vests will float to the top while inside of the sinking aircraft, unable to get out.

Business class at the front appears to be the most dangerous section to have a seat, not always the case but more often that not the front passengers are less likely to survive a plane crash. Better to sit at the back than the front if there are no seats available over the wings imo.
Ensure that people travelling with you are seated next to you and not interspersed in other seats/locations on the aircraft.

Do background search on airline you are booking your flight on, do not fly 'regional', watch my previously posted video as to why to not fly regional, people do not always realize they are flying regional because the corporations cover up their own cost cutting to make the appearance that people are not flying 'regional' where there is much in the way of cost cutting and lax safety standards.
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Plane Spotting 15 Apr 2017 09:20 #11

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United Airlines' Own Contract Denied it any Right to Remove Passenger

For the moment, I want to focus on the basic premise—and legal assumptions—behind most of the press accounts of the incident. Most articles and news reports have implied that the airline was permitted to remove Dao from the airplane. Articles have made this claim as part of a larger point to readers: Airlines frequently overbook their flights and “bump” passengers, and then pay them compensation in line with federal regulations governing the payment of this compensation. It happens all the time, according to the newspapers.

This overarching narrative—repeated in virtually every newspaper, with only a few exceptions—is incorrect at least as applied to this situation. Or, at the very least, it is far more complicated than the news reports suggest. In truth, airlines do indeed “bump” passengers from oversold flights, but the process by which they do so is to “deny boarding” to ticketed passengers who have otherwise complied with the boarding requirements. However, Dao was not denied boarding. Dao was granted boarding, and then subsequently involuntarily deplaned, which is not the same thing.

To understand the difference, it is important to review the facts of the case. This summary is drawn from press reports in major newspapers. It appears that Dao had a valid ticket. He presented his ticket to the gate agent, who accepted the ticket, scanned it, and granted him access to the causeway and the airplane. Because he was granted boarding, Dao walked onto the aircraft and took his seat. Only later, after he and the other passengers were in their seats, did a representative come onto the plane and explain that four seats would need to be surrendered to make room for four United Airlines employees who needed to get to Louisville. After no passengers accepted financial incentives to voluntarily relinquish seats, four seated passengers—including Dao—were told to leave. Dao refused.

Like all airlines, United has a very specific (and lengthy!) contract for carriage outlining the contractual relationship between the airline and the passenger. It includes a familiar set of provisions for when a passenger may be denied boarding (Rule 25 “Denied Boarding Compensation”). When a flight is oversold, UA can deny boarding to some passengers, who then receive compensation under specific guidelines. However, Dao was not denied boarding. He was granted boarding and then involuntarily removed from the airplane. What does the contract say about that?

It turns out that the contract has a specific rule regarding “Refusal of Transport” (Rule 21), which lays out the conditions under which a passenger can be removed and refused transport on the aircraft. This includes situations where passengers act in a “disorderly, offensive, abusive, or violent” manner, refuse to comply with the smoking policy, are barefoot or “not properly clothed,” as well as many other situations. There is absolutely no provision for deplaning a seated passenger because the flight is oversold.

An added complication here is that the flight wasn’t even oversold. The contract defines an oversold flight as “a flight where there are more Passengers holding valid confirmed Tickets that check-in for the flight within the prescribed check-in time than there are available seats.” In this case, the airline attempted to remove seated passengers to make room for airline staff requiring transport to another airport, not because it had sold more tickets than there were seats available. In any event, this point is largely moot, because neither employee transportation nor oversold situations is listed as among the reasons that a passenger may be refused transport.

One might argue that Dao had not completed “boarding” until the cabin door was closed. This argument would be wrong. The term “boarding” is not defined in the definition section of the contract, and absent an explicit definition in the contract, terms are to be afforded their plain meaning. “Boarding” means that the passenger presents a boarding pass to the gate agent who accepts or scans the pass and permits entry through the gate to the airplane, allowing the passenger to enter the aircraft and take a seat.

It is possible in this regard to distinguish between the collective completion of the plane’s boarding process, which is not complete until all passengers have boarded and the cabin door is closed. But that is different from each passenger’s boarding, which is complete for each individual once he or she has been accepted for transportation by the gate agent and proceeded to the aircraft and taken his or her assigned seat.

Bottom line is that if the airline wants to bump you from the aircraft, it must deny you boarding. After the crew grant you boarding, the number of conditions under which they may deplane you substantially decreases. In this case, United Airlines made the mistake of boarding all passengers and then trying to find space for additional crew. The airline should bear the burden of this mistake, not the passengers who successfully boarded the plane. If the airline doesn’t like this, it should have written a different contract.

Might the airline argue that it had the right to refuse transport because Dao was “disorderly, offensive, abusive, or violent” (Rule 21H1) or causing a “disturbance” (Rule 21H4)? Although this depends on the facts, news reports suggest that Dao was not upset, and was minding his own business, until he was told that he was being involuntarily removed and he was dragged kicking and screaming from the aircraft. His being upset was caused by United Airline’s breach of its contractual duties towards him as a passenger, rather than the reverse.

Finally, Rule 21 includes a provision on force majeur and other unforeseen circumstances such as weather, but there is no evidence that the airline had to specifically deplane Dao due to a force majeur that was impacting his plane. Perhaps UA could make the argument that getting the airline employees to Louisville was a necessary response to unforeseen circumstances (weather-related flight delays and cancellations in another city that caused the crew to be misplaced). The contract allows the airline to take actions that are “reasonable” or “advisable” in response to circumstances beyond its control.

UA might give “reasonable” a utilitarian gloss and argue that it was reasonable (i.e. economical) for it to deplane four passengers to transport the misplaced crew and thus prevent cancellation of another flight that would have impacted a far greater number of passengers. (I have no idea if the facts support this contention or not.) The argument is vulnerable to various questions about the reasonableness or advisability of the action. Could the airline have arranged alternate transportation for the misplaced crew, such as renting a car and driver, or used a larger aircraft, but refused to do so because it was too cheap? Following this train of thought might just make the public angrier. The utilitarian argument suggests that the rights of individual passengers can be balanced away—which is precisely why so many people are furious about the airline’s conduct.

All of this means that the airline may not have had the right to remove Dao from the aircraft. What are the consequences of this breach? Rule 21 on Refusal of Transport states that “UA is not liable for its refusal to transport any passenger or for its removal of any passenger in accordance with this Rule” and that the sole remedy is a refund of the ticket. In this case, however, United Airlines did not deplane the passenger “in accordance with this Rule,” but probably acted contrary to the Rule. So, the liability exclusion by its terms does not apply.

The last aspect of this case – the most disturbing one – is the level of force used by the police officers. Based on the videos, most observers have concluded that the force was excessive and unnecessary given the circumstances. A deeper issue is whether the police had the authority to remove Dao in the first instance once United Airlines declared him persona non grata and asked the police to treat him as a trespasser.

Presumably the police had the authority to remove him (but only with an appropriate level of force), but even so, there is a plausible argument that Dao’s injuries and damages suffered during that process were caused by the airline’s breach of contract, which specifically defines the circumstances when it can refuse transport, none of which applied in this case.

In some situations, a contractual dispute and a trespassing dispute should be kept separate. Say you hire a painter to paint the inside of your house. You refuse to pay and so the painter says, “I’m not leaving until you pay me.” When the painter refuses to leave, you call the police and ask them to remove him because he is trespassing. The proper resolution is that the painter must leave but can sue you for breach of contract.

That may be so, but in that case, the painter’s refusal to leave is incidental to the object and purpose of the contract, which is to paint the house, not stay in your house. In contrast, the object and purpose of the contract of carriage is, among other things, to require the airline to transport the passenger from location A to location B aboard aircraft C. Being on the aircraft is the whole point of the contract, and it specifically lists the situations when the airline may deny transport to a ticketed customer. Since the airline did not comply with those requirements, it should be liable for the damages associated with their breach.

www.dorfonlaw.org/2017/04/united-airlines-own-contract-denied-it.html
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Plane Spotting 15 Apr 2017 10:07 #12

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1365 = 1

1.1365 = 1,283,305,580,313,352
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Plane Spotting 03 May 2017 02:13 #13

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Brawl on airplane recorded by Arizona man

When an Arizona photographer on board an All Nippon Airways flight from Narita, Japan to Los Angeles saw two men get into a serious brawl about 10 minutes before takeoff, he made sure to catch it on video.

It happened at about 5 p.m. Monday, which would have been 1 a.m. Monday Arizona time.

Corey Hour tweeted about the incident that took place a few rows ahead of him, saying that he got in between a man in a red shirt, believed to be the one who started the fight, and flight attendants.

According to Hour, the man in the red shirt pointed at another man and said, “Where are you from?” and “I’ll kill you.”

The man then assaulted his seatmate. Another man a row behind him got involved. Fists started flying and Hour started recording.

You can hear people yelling and a baby wail as the men pound on each other.

“The video ended when I stepped in & confronted the man in the red shirt. I told him to leave and squared up with him, he backed down n left,” he tweeted.

“We had to stop it,” Hour told CBSLA.com. “We had to stop it because I was seeing people, I was seeing people attacked. I was seeing people in danger. … You can’t just be an innocent bystander because you’re going to get wrapped in either way.

“I felt like when this situation happened, I had to take a stand,” he continued. “There was literally no kind of way for us to get past the situation; we had to take it in our own hands.”

It’s not clear what sparked the fight, but Hour said the man yelled “You think I’m crazy? What about the government!”

ANA Airlines told KCBS that the man assaulted a gate agent as he got off the plane. He was arrested, but his name has not been released.

The flight finally left Japan, light one passenger, about 90 minutes after the incident.

Hour’s Twitter bio describes him as an Arizona-based director, photographer and videographer, as well as a world traveler.

www.azfamily.com/story/35319363/caught-on-camera-brawl-on-airplane-recorded-by-arizona-man

Good thing the plane wasn't actually in flight yet.
Last Edit: 03 May 2017 02:26 by annabelle.
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Plane Spotting 03 May 2017 14:45 #14

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I would imagine you need air traffic control clearance for some of these giant model aircraft.. :hahano: An expensive hobby too if your engine stalls mid flight.





The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane. – Marcus Aurelius
Last Edit: 03 May 2017 15:26 by Return of Zorro.
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Plane Spotting 03 May 2017 21:46 #15

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Plane Spotting 03 May 2017 22:17 #16

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Plane Spotting 13 Jul 2017 10:35 #17

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Gaia wrote:


Maho Beach, Sint Maarten, Dutch Antilles :thumbup:
annabelle wrote:
^^^ that is insane.. perhaps I think so even more because I've watched every episode of the Mayday Air Crash Investigations series on youtube.

Well ...

www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/incidents/report-new-zealand-woman-killed-by-jet-plane-takeoff/news-story/79a77d9834f02506619c2afeb0e8f245
1365 = 1

1.1365 = 1,283,305,580,313,352
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Plane Spotting 13 Jul 2017 15:55 #18

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1365 = 1

1.1365 = 1,283,305,580,313,352
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