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TOPIC: Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care

Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 18:06 #101

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Rocco wrote:
You should get a refund
Ugh wrote:
I like to think there's nothing more for me to learn. . .

Accordingly, I won’t waste any more of my time replying to your posts.
Last Edit: 05 May 2019 19:20 by Connect Dots. Reason: Typo
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 19:53 #102

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Here is a YouTube channel for people interested in self-healing what is termed "bipolar disorder" in psychiatry:


Description

My videos and book are dedicated to informing as many people as possible of the spiritually healing potential of "bipolar disorder". Having a "spiritual bipolar" crisis was one of the best things to ever happen to me.
Sean Blackwell

www.youtube.com/user/bipolarorwakingup/about

Here is the first video that was uploaded to the channel, in 2007:
bipolarorwakingup
Published on Jul 22, 2007

Having a "bipolar" crisis was one of the best things to ever happen to me. It really woke me up! Watch my videos to find out why.

Last Edit: 05 May 2019 19:56 by Connect Dots. Reason: Typo
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 21:40 #103

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Ugh wrote:
I like to think there's nothing more for me to learn. . .
Connect Dots wrote:
Accordingly, I won’t waste any more of my time replying to your posts.

Bad call mate, because if people know that you've admitted you're still learning, they might decide to give you a miss and come to a know-it-all like me instead..;)

PS- another anecdote to illustrate how some people seemingly don't want to be helped-
Some years ago I went on a coach trip to Blackpool with a pleasant young woman; I quickly recognised she was autistic but we got on alright although she hardly spoke.
We dated a couple of times after that, so in an effort to help her break free of her tight little introverted world I bought her a pair of stylish shoes to replace the hideous shapeless moccasins she always wore, but she refused pointblank to wear them and we quickly drifted apart.
Pity because I was planning to get her a Wonder Woman outfit later.
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 22:12 #104

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Ugh wrote:
Ugh wrote:
I like to think there's nothing more for me to learn. . .
Connect Dots wrote:
Accordingly, I won’t waste any more of my time replying to your posts.

Bad call mate, because if people know that you've admitted you're still learning, they might decide to give you a miss and come to a know-it-all like me instead..;)

PS- another anecdote to illustrate how some people seemingly don't want to be helped-
Some years ago I went on a coach trip to Blackpool with a pleasant young woman; I quickly recognised she was autistic but we got on alright although she hardly spoke.
We dated a couple of times after that, so in an effort to help her break free of her tight little introverted world I bought her a pair of stylish shoes to replace the hideous shapeless moccasins she always wore, but she refused pointblank to wear them and we quickly drifted apart.
Pity because I was planning to get her a Wonder Woman outfit later.

Certainly a great con-tribution to the topic of "psychiatry".
The Only Limit is Your Own Imagination
A truth seeker is someone who dares to wade through thick series of toxic smoke screens and tries not to inhale - Gaia
"What do you call 'genius'?" "Well, seeing things others don't see. Or rather the invisible links between things."
- Vladimir Nabokov (1938)
"The silence of conspiracy. Slaughtered on the altar of apathy." - Lords of the New Church (1982)
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 06 May 2019 12:13 #105

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Connect Dots wrote:
Listen to Robert Whitaker talk about the rationale for the movement and website Mad in America . . .
Connect Dots wrote:
On this website, there is a section where patients and families of patients tell their personal stories.
The more I read these personal stories, the more I am convinced that symptoms of mental illness that are described and given a billing code in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) are just understandable behaviors if the person is understood by the observer.

The person needs understanding and affirmation, not neurotoxins.

That's what I hear in this first paragraph of a personal story:
Psychiatry’s Failure to Acknowledge Who I Really Am


By Diana van Landeghem
February 14, 2018

I was a very sensitive and aware child. I did not know yet what would happen to me when I became a 25-year-old adult. I did not fit in the education system, but I was very intelligent and highly gifted; though I felt pretty trapped in this system, I received high grades. But I was not really myself. My parents barely had time to have a decent conversation with me. They were so busy earning money, buying things and being unhappy. . .

www.madinamerica.com/2018/02/psychiatry-failure-acknowledge/
There needs to be a new day in psychiatry, where the psychiatrist focuses on listening to the client instead of writing prescriptions.

Troubled people in need of help should be "clients" not patients.
Last Edit: 06 May 2019 12:16 by Connect Dots. Reason: Clarify
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 06 May 2019 13:40 #106

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Connect Dots wrote:
Listen to Robert Whitaker talk about the rationale for the movement and website Mad in America . . .

Here is another website calling for reform in psychiatry, MindFreedom International:


MindFreedom International is a nonprofit organization that unites sponsor and affiliate grassroots groups with thousands of individual members to win human rights and alternatives for people labeled with psychiatric disabilities.

mindfreedom.org/about-mfi/

:) "Grassroots" is music to my ears.

I see they are planning an event for this month:

:thumbup:
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 06 May 2019 18:13 #107

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Gaia wrote:
..Certainly a great con-tribution to the topic of "psychiatry".

Thanks mate, remember I was once sent to a shrink and he pronounced me sane, so my street cred is therefore off the scale..:)
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 06 May 2019 18:19 #108

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Connect Dots wrote:
By Diana van Landeghem-
I was a very sensitive and aware child...My parents barely had time to have a decent conversation with me. They were so busy earning money, buying things and being unhappy...

Yes, the road to kids getting emotional problems begins with bad parenting.
When we're young we like to think our parents are all-knowing, so if they bully us, we tend to think it's US whose at fault and not them.
That's why I tell people- "Once you can admit to yourself that your parents are no good, it'll be a turning point and you'll begin getting stronger from then on.
.:)

Anecdote-
As a kid, I used to like building plastic model aeroplanes, but instead of encouraging me, my dad would sneer- "Huh, been wasting your money again, when are you going to grow up and start saving your money?", and naturally that made me a bit unhappy to think I was doing something wrong.
Perhaps he'd have preferred me to join the local gang and run wild with them instead of sitting quietly up in my room every night building models!
By my early teens I realised he was a sh*t dad, and from that point my self-esteem began to return, and I never spoke to him for the last 15 years of his life, I simply blanked him out as if he didn't exist
..:)
Last Edit: 06 May 2019 18:27 by Ugh.
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 06 May 2019 20:12 #109

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A horrible thing that sometimes happens to people who hear voices is that people in their lives do a very stupid thing, out of ignorance:
My Encounter with the University of Minnesota’s Psychiatric Department

By Stephen Zuckerman
March 18, 2018

. . . One devoted friend, an influential physician at the University of Minnesota, felt strongly that I had “lost it” and tried to persuade me to see his psychiatry buddy at the university. The voice and I agreed to not participate. My friend, his psychiatrist, my girlfriend, and family members then conspired to have me “arrested” and incarcerated at the University of Minnesota’s locked psych ward. It was an extreme measure; at no time did my records show that I was suicidal or homicidal or a menace to anyone. Nor did I feel I was a menace. But my friends and family were all convinced that their actions were meant for my best good, that they were rescuing me. . . .

www.madinamerica.com/2018/03/encounter-university-minnesota-psychiatric-department/
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 06 May 2019 20:34 #110

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Connect Dots wrote:
A horrible thing that sometimes happens to people who hear voices is that people in their lives do a very stupid thing, out of ignorance . . .
There is more to that story:
. . . As for the University of Minnesota Psychiatric Department, it was later torn apart by scandal. It turns out that researchers were being paid large sums of money to test neuroleptics on patients deemed psychotic. This led to the over-diagnosing of patients as psychotic, and then the abusive use of neuroleptics, sometimes with disastrous results. I certainly fit the abused-patient profile. At the time, the university’s department of psychiatry was a leading proponent of the theory that a chemical imbalance was the cause of psychosis and that chemical treatment with neuroleptics would effectively treat the psychosis, if not cure it. The newly appointed Head of Psychiatry at the University of Minnesota now professes a policy of psychotherapy as first line for treating “psychosis”—much in line with the Hearing Voices Network’s (HVN) proselytizing. Antipsychotic medication use is now to be avoided as much as possible. I support HVN and applaud its success in changing psychiatry’s abusive use of dangerous drugs. I recently saw the film A Beautiful Mind, about how Nobel Laureate John Nash overcomes his disabling hallucinations by learning to deal with them, rather than taking antipsychotic medications. HVN could have produced the film. . . .

www.madinamerica.com/2018/03/encounter-university-minnesota-psychiatric-department/
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 06 May 2019 21:22 #111

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This person is using litigation in response to poor mental health care, which is probably what it's going to take to change things:


Seeking Justice

By Bryan Sutherland
February 9, 2018

My name is Bryan Sutherland and I am currently suing my former psychiatrist for damages of various degrees. I am 29 years old and a licensed private investigator. In my early years, I was bullied in school which caused me to experience some minor anxiety from my negative school environment and the judgment of my peers. In 2001, at age 13, I was referred to a psychiatrist for an assessment, given my increased absenteeism from school because of playground torment. The psychiatrist at the time was not interested in the abuse in my environment and decided that I had a chemical imbalance in my brain which needed to be corrected with a chemical balancer — that being big pharma psychotropic drug products. I was diagnosed with Anxiety Disorder (NOS), meaning not otherwise specified, and we left with a prescription for an antidepressant to remedy my supposed chemical imbalance which was never tested prior to treatment. . . .

www.madinamerica.com/2018/02/seeking-justice/
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 06 May 2019 21:53 #112

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An excellent presentation:
Danish DOX
Published on Apr 29, 2019

Robert Whitaker at the Symposium about Scientific Freedom, Copenhagen, 9 March 2019.

Lecture: "Scientific censorship in psychiatry."

Last Edit: 06 May 2019 21:53 by Connect Dots. Reason: Typo
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 07 May 2019 00:12 #113

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Connect Dots wrote:
. . .the movement and website Mad in America. . .
On this website, there is a section where patients and families of patients tell their personal stories.

Additionally, the website has a section to report on initiatives:
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 07 May 2019 10:39 #114

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TOPIC: Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care

Well, this thread has now run to 6 pages and I'm still not sure what it's about (what the hell is a 'Paradigm' anyway?)
Is the thread saying that ALL psychiatric drugs are useless?
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 07 May 2019 12:04 #115

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From the website Mad in America section on personal stories:
Life Sentence: Life Behind the Bars of the Mental Health System

By Sandra Villarreal
January 19, 2018

. . . Over thirty-five years ago, at the age of 22, my local community mental healthcare system gave me a life sentence. By then, I’d been living with PTSD for years following two violent rapes. The first rape was at knifepoint when I was 13 years old, the other at 19 when I was kidnapped and taken to a cemetery for the night by two unknown men. Both experiences were terrifying. I was also trying to adjust to living with my new abusive, alcoholic husband that I did love. So, I sought out the guidance of a psychiatrist, in whom I put my utmost trust. Instead of the help I anticipated, the psychiatrist labeled me with bipolar disorder, telling me that I had a chemical imbalance in my brain. I quickly found out that the minute you sit down in the chair in a mental health professional’s office, you’re no longer seen as a person. The mental health system is incapable of seeing past the solid wall of your current label. Their only cure is drugs. . . .

www.madinamerica.com/2018/01/life-sentence-mental-health-system/
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 07 May 2019 12:06 #116

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Ive met and talked to two shrinks in my time, one for over 30 years and they have both told me they came into their profession in order to heal themselves. They are both fucked up, to put it bluntly. They are unfit to help others, in my words.
Physician heal thyself.
liberabo te ab inferno

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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 07 May 2019 12:22 #117

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Lux Interior wrote:
Ive met and talked to two shrinks in my time, one for over 30 years and they have both told me they came into their profession in order to heal themselves. They are both fucked up, to put it bluntly. They are unfit to help others, in my words.
Physician heal thyself.
The person who inspired me to take on psychiatry as a research project, Dr Peter Breggin, talks about psychiatrists themselves being troubled individuals.

I have compassion for both the victims of the present paradigm, the patients, and the psychiatrists, though, because it's the system that is rotten. Profit-seeking pharmaceutical companies control medical school education and medical journals. The same people control the mainstream media.

Going up against that cartel is downright dangerous. At one time in his life as a reformer, Dr Breggin had to have body-guards.
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 07 May 2019 12:57 #118

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Lux Interior wrote:
Ive met and talked to two shrinks in my time, one for over 30 years and they have both told me they came into their profession in order to heal themselves. They are both fucked up, to put it bluntly. They are unfit to help others, in my words.
Physician heal thyself.

Yes, same with philosophers such as the screwed-up atheist crackpot Nietzsche, yet amazingly some people look up to him! Talk about "the blind leading the blind"..:)

WIKI- "Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was a scholar whose work has exerted a profound influence on Western philosophy and modern intellectual history.
In 1889 at age 44, he suffered a collapse and afterward, a complete loss of his mental faculties.
Prominent elements of his philosophy include his radical critique of truth in favour of perspectivism; his genealogical critique of religion and Christian morality.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Nietzsche
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 07 May 2019 13:37 #119

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The website Mad in America also has a section for videos, which includes various categories.

One of them is "Brainsplain":


It was my final psychiatry rotation in medical school, and my job was to tell an Iraq veteran about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Although I wore a stethoscope and deepened my voice, the veteran had greater authority on PTSD. She handed me a scientific paper with the newest research on her condition, and I realized she had paid about forty dollars for the article. Gatekeepers (like me!) and paywalls discourage the public from evaluating publicly-funded research. I was stung by the injustice.

A crazy idea came to me: video reports on new findings in psychiatry, featuring interviews with the public. I’m excited to now be doing this video project, called Brainsplain, in collaboration with MIA. In these videos, end-users of mental health resources critique the latest psychiatry research. I summarize new mental health investigations, and patients evaluate the significance. They share their hopes for future therapies and for changes to culture. They also assess ethical issues raised by the research.

My desire to let the public weigh in on research and therapies is rooted in my prior career as a hospice chaplain. I wanted to know why Latino people rarely used hospice, so I joined a Latino Women’s Healthy Heart Council. An older woman leveled with me, “We’ve been handed brochures, but hospice hasn’t offered real partnership where we get to have a say.” Sales-based “outreach” had marginalized these potential users of hospice. They were being treated like passive customers, rather than respected decision-makers and shapers of intensely personal services.

With this feedback, I invited families from minority communities to lead discussions with hospice doctors, nurses, and chaplains. Families talked about their values and traditions regarding end-of-life. After we started including input from black and Latino families, more came to us for end-of-life care. The enduring lesson was that when communities feel stigmatized, patronized, and disenfranchised by the healthcare system, they must be given a platform to express their values.

While doing this work, I noticed a primary care doctor at every meeting for Latino health. His passion to empower Latin American women kept me coming back, even after my hospice project. This doctor did not wear his white coat, and he had nothing to sell. He simply shared developments in medicine, and asked Latino women about their health priorities. He was building a true partnership with the community, in a way I’d never seen. I told him, “I need to be part of this.” He encouraged me, “If you want to devote your life to marginalized patients, consider medical school.” I applied and enrolled.

In my training on the hospital wards, the patients labeled “difficult” were the most compelling to me. These were the psychiatric patients. The power gap between providers and those receiving mental healthcare was a yawning canyon. I saw no equivalent to the Latino Women’s Healthy Heart Council for these disenfranchised people.

Then, when that Iraq veteran sparked the idea for video reviews, I immediately began explaining new research to people I met, and asked to record their opinions for public consumption. I go to VFW posts when research is conducted with veterans. Sometimes I set up a video camera in a public space and invite strangers to talk. Those affected by mental health conditions line up to have a say on what happens with psychiatry research. For example, a philosophy graduate student reflected on a pilot study of a behavior-based therapy for depression: “Why just a pilot study!? When can there be serious funding for less-invasive therapies like this one?” He added, “I go to a psychiatrist with deep questions of the mind, and the answer is always, ‘Try this drug.’ There’s always funding for that answer!”

The interests of institutional medicine can differ from the priorities of patients. Leaders in academic medicine may overvalue new, profitable therapies. Doctors may have different tolerance for risk compared to their patients. Diagnostic categories, while useful to providers, can add to disease burden of patients when labels feel like name-calling.

We accept that the people who evaluate the latest gadgets, movies, and restaurants are end-users of these products and services. The reviewers are not engineers, marketers and business owners. And yet conversations about the significance of new medical research are almost entirely carried on above the heads of patients, who are only later given pre-packaged sales pitches when therapies hit the market. Doctors and researchers often “declare” that they have “no conflicts of interest.” But conflicts of interest are inherent in jobs that are directly and indirectly funded by the business of medicine, and in an academic culture where it’s taken for granted that providers and scientists — not patients — should have control.

It’s time to demonstrate the same respect for the public that we show for scientists and doctors. By engaging directly with patients, we can learn the wants and needs of healthcare’s most important stakeholders. Conversations can reveal unanticipated insights that surprise even the patients. I hope these Brainsplain videos will foster a more honest partnership between the healthcare establishment and the public. I’m eager for your input.



www.madinamerica.com/2018/09/introducing-brainsplain/

(VFW=Veterans of Foreign Wars.)

Here is the Description that goes with the above embedded video:
Brainsplain
Published on Jun 29, 2018

MDMA (the drug Ecstasy) can help treat PTSD. I discussed new research on this with people who had personal experience with MDMA. Conversations took place at the 2018 Summer Solstice festival in Madison, Wisconsin, at Olbrich Park.

• Mithoefer, Michael C., et al. "3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)-assisted psychotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder in military veterans, firefighters, and police officers: a randomized, double-blind, dose-response, phase 2 clinical trial." The Lancet Psychiatry 5.6 (2018): 486-497.
I see now that Mad in America is not 100% against the use of drugs in psychiatry.

(The other categories in the videos section of Mad in America are "Parenting Today: Raising Strong Resilient Kids," "The Pseudoscience of Mental Health," and "Individual Videos."
Last Edit: 07 May 2019 13:40 by Connect Dots. Reason: Add link
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 07 May 2019 13:47 #120

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Connect Dots wrote:
..I see now that Mad in America is not 100% against the use of drugs in psychiatry...

Good, the bottom line is that if drugs do help in some cases, they're okay..:)

PS- but as regards PTSD patients generally, I've got very little sympathy for them because if they can't handle the stresses of the job they should never have taken it in the first place, or at least adopt a healthy Christian mindset to help them deal with it.
Last Edit: 07 May 2019 13:50 by Ugh.
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