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TOPIC: Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care

Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 03 May 2019 12:04 #81

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Frothy wrote:
You're boosting your mental strength by reading your bible, so it's like a mental crutch..
It's probably why you keep making these sort of racy statements and act in a counter-Christian and selfish manner, you wan't to give Jesus something to do, you want him to forgive you.

No offence mate but perhaps being spiritually-retarded (like you seem to be) is a form of mental illness in itself?
And you're certainly showing classic symptoms of demonic oppression.
As I've said before, I wish you'd go to the TZ Religious section for spiritual enlightenment although it'd probably do no good..;)-

"Speak not in the ears of a fool, for he will despise the wisdom of your words" (Bible:Proverbs 23:9)
Last Edit: 03 May 2019 12:07 by Ugh.
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 03 May 2019 12:23 #82

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Frothy and Ugh, please don't derail this thread with a back and forth tit for tat.

Perhaps one of you start a new thread to discuss whatever disagreement the two of you have that needs airing?

Or perhaps do it in private messages?
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 03 May 2019 12:37 #83

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Connect Dots wrote:
..I, personally, am very encouraged by the voice that the website Mad in America is giving to the movement to reform psychiatry.
This is the internet at its best!

Yes, the cobwebby oldfashioned methods can't withstand the onslaught of the "internet army" and their modern enlightened thinking..:)

Here's something else to consider- many bright students kill themselves for no apparent reason, but I'd suggest it's because they tire their minds by all those months of relentless studying and swotting, and eventually crack up.
Maybe we're all born with a "psychic shield", but that shield becomes drained by stress and overwork, leading to a loss of our grip on reality?
Perhaps that's why one of the 10 Commandments is to keep the Sabbath as a rest day to recharge our mental batteries and restore the shield?

Anecdote-
One Saturday afternoon in the 1970's when i was in my 20's i was home alone while the rest of the family were out shopping in town, and i spent the time up in my room building a plastic model ship.
Around teatime i heard voices in the street outside that sounded like the family returning, then i heard our front gate unlatch, then i heard the key go in the front door, then heard their voices and footsteps come into the hallway.
Then there was dead silence.
I went downstairs to greet them but there was nobody there, i looked in the living room, kitchen, even the garden and garden shed, but nothing, they were nowhere to be seen.
I assumed they must have gone out to do a bit more shopping up the road , so i went back up to carry on with my ship.
After about an hour they came back and i asked my mother if they'd arrived earlier and gone back out again, but she said no, and hadn't a clue what i was talking about.
So i just put the earlier "arrival" down to a trick of the mind or a "waking dream" or whatever, and felt fascinated and privileged to have experienced it.
A few years later i happened to learn from a paranormal book that the phenomenon is fairly common, and is called "False Arrival", where somebody hears one or more friends or family members come into the house, followed by silence.

PS- Another 'False Arrival' was featured in a TV prog about the paranormal. The manager of a small engineering firm was working late on his own one night doing the accounts in the old control tower on a disused airfield where his firm was renting some hangars, when he heard footsteps plodding up the stone stairs and stop outside his door.
After a short silence he impatiently called out "Well come on in then!", but nobody did. He went and opened the door but there was nobody there.
There seems to be a similarity there between me concentrating on building that fiddly model ship, and the manager concentrating on his accounts, so perhaps our "shields" were weakened because we were draining power from it to concentrate on tasks that require a heavy mental workload.

I also read about another False Arrival that happened to two students (tired minds again perhaps?) in the street, they left their house with a friend, but halfway down the street the friend realised he'd forgotten something, so he ran back to the house to get it, and his two friends strolled slowly on. Soon they heard his footsteps running up behind them but when they turned round he wasn't there. Shortly after, he came running up for real.

Kirk- "Report Mr. Spock"
Spock- "We're being probed captain, source and origin unknown"
Kirk- "Shields up, red alert!"
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 03 May 2019 14:27 #84

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Ugh wrote:
Maybe we're all born with a "psychic shield", but that shield becomes drained by stress and overwork, leading to a loss of our grip on reality?
You have reminded me of an interview I watched on Gaia.

Randy Veitenheimer talks about the fact that when we're born, we are ourselves, but as we are affected by the people and pressures in our lives, we lose contact with our own self because we're trying to please others and stay out of trouble. (That is my paraphrase.)

This link will be good for 24 hours once the link is clicked:


Randy's new show 'Quantum Effect' will release here on Gaia, April 15th.

Randy Veitenheimer helps people to reclaim their own authenticity, which empowers their body and being back into healthy states. He does this by measuring the energy field surrounding a person, which reveals one’s level of health and resilience against illness. Then, he helps them to increase the size and strength of their energy field, which can impact every area of their life. He offers simple techniques that you can begin using, today.

Instructor/Host: Regina Meredith
Featuring: Randy Veitenheimer
Video Language: English

give.gaia.com/cjv842ohj009s01r1uoc6mnnn


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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 03 May 2019 18:29 #85

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Connect Dots wrote:
Randy Veitenheime[/url]r talks about the fact that when we're born, we are ourselves, but as we are affected by the people and pressures in our lives, we lose contact with our own self because we're trying to please others and stay out of trouble. (That is my paraphrase.)

Yes, in fact the Bible too speaks of not letting ourselves be "polluted" by the world..:)
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 04 May 2019 12:00 #86

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In the present model of psychiatry, the manual that psychiatrists use to diagnose patients is called the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders," (DSM). There is nothing scientific about it; it is names given to behavior and nothing about underlying cause.

The first edition was published in 1952. The current edition, DSM-5, came out in 2013.

This article makes a very good point about the DSM:
My Mental Health Awakening


By Starr R. Stoddard, MSW
March 2, 2019

My mental health story begins in 1993. I was a 14-year-old freshman in high school who had no idea what “mental health” was. All I knew was that something felt off inside, and I did not feel comfortable in my own skin. Lo and behold, a dark, relentless, persistent, sinking feeling crept in, which has followed me for almost 26 years. The symptoms of chronic sad days, which is not foreign to many other individuals, were hijacked by a group of glib people with letters after their name. They created a mental health manifesto, calling it the DSM, and I believe it was created in order to capitalize financially on affliction, by labeling a very common feeling of trying to adjust to change, 296.30, major depression, which is merely a billing code — one that almost made me a lifelong consumer of a very sinister, poisonous mental health industry.

www.madinamerica.com/2019/03/my-mental-health-awakening/

There is no question in my mind that psychiatry, along with other parts of the medical establishment, is an industry with profit-seeking the underlying mission.

That is what needs to change.
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 04 May 2019 14:36 #87

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Connect Dots wrote:
A better way is Empathic Therapy . . .

Here is a blog article by Dr. Peter Breggin written in 2011:


Almost exactly one year ago, my wife Ginger and I, and a number of friends and colleagues, began to form the Center for the Study of Empathic Therapy, Education & Living. We also began to plan its first annual Empathic Therapy Conference, scheduled to take place shortly on April 8-10, 2011 in Syracuse, New York.

During this past 12 months, the response has been so positive from around the world that it has become apparent that a new field of Empathic Therapy is emerging.

The 20th Century saw deep divisions and a variety of alternatives spring up within the overall arena of what’s loosely called “mental health.” Early in the century, Freud and his followers developed psychoanalysis which evolved in a cult-like manner as the Freudians literally franchised their theory and practice in psychoanalytic institutes throughout the Western World.

Inevitably, the movement fragmented, most notably with Carl Jung seeking to delve deeper into man’s spiritual nature while Alfred Adler promoted a social view of human beings.

In the 1960s psychiatrists R. D. Laing and Aaron Esterson in England broke with the establishment and developed the concept that individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia do not suffer from a disease but instead from existential crises caused in part by psychological and emotional undermining within their families of origin. A broader school of existential psychology and psychiatry emphasized the necessity of human choice in a world that was seen as essentially devoid of meaning.

During this same period of time, psychiatrist Thomas Szasz in the United States criticized “the myth of mental illness” — the illusion that mental and moral problems can be understood as biological disorders or diseases. He effectively argued that involuntary treatment was not treatment but coercion, and that it was a crime against humanity.

In psychology Carl Rogers developed what would become “person-centered” therapy, an empathic approach based on helping individuals discover and give voice to their own needs and directions. Within psychology, a broader field of humanistic psychology developed under the leadership of individuals like Rogers and Abraham Maslow with emphasis on promoting positive or life-enhancing values.

In partial agreement with many of these critiques and alternative views, in the 1970s I became the first “insider” within psychiatry to systematically and scientifically examine — and to speak openly against — the damaging effects of drugs, electroshock and lobotomy. I developed the scientific concept of brain-disabling treatment which observes that all biopsychiatric treatments work precisely by causing brain damage and dysfunction.

I then added the scientific concept of intoxication anosognosia (“medication spellbinding”), which explains how individuals taking psychiatric drugs can feel or believe they are better off when in reality they are impaired. I also joined other voices calling for a more caring and empowering approach to therapy, especially psychiatrist Loren Mosher who showed in a project called Soteria House that individuals diagnosed schizophrenic recovered better in medication-free homelike environments than in drug-drenched mental hospitals.

Within these various approaches, some practitioners and leaders adopted polar opposite social positions. Many devotees of Thomas Szasz place so much emphasis on individual freedom and so little on empathy that, like Szasz, they reject almost any involvement in psychiatric reform other than to oppose involuntary treatment. In what could be seen as callousness and social irresponsibility, they see no reason to put themselves forward to defend the unwitting or vulnerable victims of psychiatric abuse.

Szasz, for example, refused to support and even criticized my successful campaign to stop the return of lobotomy and psychosurgery in the 1970s. He utterly rejects the idea that love, caring or empathy are at the heart of good therapy or the good life.

Seemingly at an opposite pole from Szasz, some have taken the position that psychotherapy must recognize that individual happiness cannot be achieved in a world filled with injustice and inequality, and that guilt is a righteous and inevitable emotion given the suffering of others. Under the guise of empathy, they discourage people from seeking their own personal happiness.

Meanwhile, beleaguered biological psychiatry circled its wagons, simply ignored all of the intellectual ferment taking place in the field, went into formal collaboration with the drug companies, and declared that human psychological suffering is genetic and biological in origin and best suited to treatment with drugs and electroshock.

Claiming the mantle of scientific progress, psychiatry took a giant step back into its darkest ages. The vast majority of psychiatrists stopped doing any psychotherapy. With increasingly little to offer, establishment psychiatry in the 1970s turned to the pharmaceutical industry to support its power and authority with untold millions of dollars.

Academic psychology as taught in college and graduate schools largely adopted the gospel of organized psychiatry, often with an amalgam of behaviorism that together treat human beings as mechanical devices rather than choice-making agents and value-creating beings. In clinical psychology and social work graduate schools, the American Psychiatric Association Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders became accepted with fundamentalist fervor. Humanistic, existential or person-centered graduate school programs or clinics have become difficult to find.

This brief sketch of necessity skims the surface. It’s meant as background for bringing out the unique as well as the shared qualities of the new field of Empathic Therapy.

First, Empathic Therapy is a big tent. Divergent views, cordially expressed and discussed, are welcome. However, the goal of the Center for the Study of Empathic Therapy, Education and Living is to study and to encourage genuine human engagement as the centerpiece of all good helping relationships. If you are only in partial agreement, come along. You will find the participants happy to engage and even to embrace differences of opinion, provided they do not oppress those who seek help.

Second, genuine empathy, as well as good science, lead to the conclusion that damaging the brain with drugs, electroshock and lobotomy is simply wrong, and should be actively opposed. Unfortunately, the leadership of the various divergent schools and critiques have rarely if ever dared stand up to organized psychiatry by criticizing the use of these brain-damaging treatments. Jung, Adler, Rogers, and nearly all the existential and humanistic leadership have always taken a “live and let live” approach to the most abusive psychiatric practices. Szasz was the first to clearly and meritoriously criticize involuntary treatment, but he and many of his followers have taken a hands-off attitude toward the actual physical abuses perpetrated by psychiatry.

Third, authoritarian viewpoints embedded in psychiatry, and in much of contemporary psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, have no place in empathic therapy. Diagnosing people with pejorative labels elevates the therapist to a superior position while diminishing those who seek help.

Fourth, unlike biological psychiatrists and unlike behaviorists, empathic therapy rejects a view of human beings that sees them as driven by their genetics and biochemistry, and instead emphasizes the choice-making and values, including ethical principles of living, empathy and love. As I have documented in dozens of scientific articles and books, including Brain-Disabling Treatments in Psychiatry, Second Edition (2008), there is no convincing evidence that so-called psychiatric disorders are physical diseases or genetic and biochemical in origin.

Fifth, empathic therapy rejects both polarized social viewpoints — the one that says our personal freedom and happiness is all that matters and the other that says our personal happiness cannot be achieved until Utopia is created on Earth. Every human being has the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, and true satisfaction in life always involves freely chosen relationships characterized by genuine engagement and love. For many, this engagement will be mostly focused on more intimate and family lives, and for some others, it will involve taking on larger community and political concerns.

Sixth, unlike nearly all the well-known alternatives, empathic therapy encourages the inclusion in therapy of freely chosen spiritual and religious beliefs. The humanistic and existential approaches sometimes include “spirituality,” but often reject a belief in God. Empathic therapy does not promote religion, and agnostics and atheists belong to the Center and support its efforts. However, empathic therapists understand that God is central to the lives of many, if not most individuals, and that a therapeutic approach will be most successful when it includes, as Alcoholics Anonymous does, an integration of recovery and healing with principles of living, higher values and with God according to the individual’s choice.

Genuine empathy, sound ethics and science leads to the following conclusions: that genuine caring engagement is at the heart of all helping relationships; that biological psychiatry with its drugs, electroshock and involuntary treatment is anti-therapeutic, unscientific, unethical, and should be opposed; that authoritarianism and pretenses at superior knowledge have no place in therapy; that human beings should be encouraged to pursue their own happiness with the understanding that genuine satisfaction involves ethical, loving relationships with others and with life; and that the most effective therapy integrates an individual’s highest values, humanistic or religious, into the process.

To learn about the 15 Guidelines for Empathic Therapy, click here.

Join the emerging new field of Empathic Therapy. Professionals and the public are welcome. Join the nonprofit Center for the Study of Empathic Therapy, Education and Living. And come to the first international Empathic Therapy Conference in Syracuse, New York, only days from now, April 8-10, 2011.

www.huffpost.com/entry/empathic-therapy-an-emerg_b_841029

Apparently, there were conferences in 2011, 2012, and 2013.

More recently, there is a new name: the International Center for the Study of Patient-Oriented Psychiatry (ICSPP):

I like that term "patient-oriented psychiatry."
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 04 May 2019 18:12 #88

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There are all kinds of mental illness of course, some requiring medication to keep it under control, but I'm fully convinced that a lot of it is caused by an incorrect mindset and a wrong outlook on life, so we need to point out to the victim how he/she needs to "self-cure" by simply changing their outlook.
If there's just one piece of advice I'd give to them along those lines, it'd be DON'T TAKE LIFE SERIOUSLY, and detach themselves from it to get a comforting mental buffer.
I could quote a whole truckload of Bible verses to back up everything I've just said, but it's up to the victim themselves whether they want to take it on board or not.
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 04 May 2019 18:19 #89

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Ugh wrote:
There are all kinds of mental illness of course, some requiring medication to keep it under control, but I'm fully convinced that a lot of it is caused by an incorrect mindset and a wrong outlook on life, so we need to point out to the victim how he/she needs to "self-cure" by simply changing their outlook.
If there's just one piece of advice I'd give to them along those lines, it'd be DON'T TAKE LIFE SERIOUSLY, and detach themselves from it to get a comforting mental buffer.
I could quote a whole truckload of Bible verses to back up everything I've just said, but it's up to the victim themselves whether they want to take it on board or not.
People with mental problems are reprobates, the can't be saved, as God has abandoned them
You can't fix stupid
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 04 May 2019 19:42 #90

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Ugh wrote:
There are all kinds of mental illness of course, some requiring medication to keep it under control . . .
I could not disagree more, as a careful reading of this thread shows.

There is no point in arguing with you about that, though, as your views expressed here already establish your viewpoint, which disagrees with mine.

As far as I'm concerned, this thread is not for debate between people who fundamentally disagree.

It's for the purpose of spreading the word around the world for seekers of information to have access to, and evaluate for themselves.

The information posted here by me is not pushed in the mainstream.

Thankfully, the internet competes with the mainstream.
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 04 May 2019 22:38 #91

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Ugh wrote:
There are all kinds of mental illness of course, some requiring medication to keep it under control . . .
Connect Dots wrote:
I could not disagree more, as a careful reading of this thread shows..

This thread has become so long that I'm losing track, so perhaps it might be best if you summarise it very briefly.
My stance is that self-help is the best cure in many cases, but if the victim is far gone medication might be the only answer, would you agree with that?
PS- I've received good feedback from people in internet forums over the years from those who are struggling with problems of one kind or another (examples below), so I must be doing something right..:)

MonkGirl - "Wow, thank you Mick! That is really comforting...and all I really needed to hear!"
HenryS - "You are brilliant Mick in finding appropriate phrases. Another one of your superb emails to store"
ChildofLight - "So good to read your responses Mick, some are quite witty and made LOL"
Coconut - "Whew! Thanks for sharing Mick"
Sarah4Jesus - "Listen to Mick in Plymouth, he is a great teacher"
Cathie - "Very wise advice Mick, thanks"
Kierri - "That was one of the best explanations I've ever heard! Yay for Mick in Plymouth"
Haimehenmmli - "I LOVE IT MATE!!! I'm going to put it into my files, with some of my other favorites, from you"
Evachrst3 - "Right on, Mick, I couldn't agree more.Thank you for defending the faith so eloquently".
Devilmademedoit2 - "I love this! Thanks, Mick!"
SweetSummer96 - "Wow. That's a cool story Mick."
Vespasian052 - "Wow! Mick,what an awesome tale.."
Beekpr9 - "Amen to all you have said, Mick!"
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Duke Tinn - "Thanks again Mick. Great Stuff"
6feetunder- "Mick knows the truth"
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Nottonguetied - "I loved those stories from Mick"
Honeybearx - "This was very good reading thank you Mick"
Megan - "Mick, I just wanted to tell you that I loved this story, it was very touching"
Benjoman - "Your one of the only ones from the singles board that I still love Mick"
Sherry Anne - "Mick i love your posts"
Antipas - "Brilliant yet again Mick"
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Kermit - "I love Mick. He is so, how shall I say it, RIGHT ON THE MONEY AND FUNNY, TOO"
Kermmiekr - "How uplifting Mick, and so very true"
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because you are able to get your point across in such a great way. WAY TO GO waymarker!!!"
Evenflow- I just LOVE this post You have made me smile BIG TIME this morning. Good for you and what a great attitude you have to life xx
Apple Pie - "Really good to see you, Mick. Come on over to 4church, we could do with your input and your humour"
Lillian - "Mick please come back..it's nice having you on the board"
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 02:55 #92

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Ugh wrote:
. . . if the victim is far gone medication might be the only answer, would you agree with that?
No.

Not even for "psychosis," which is only a name made up by psychiatrists.

As stated on the thread, psychiatric medications are neurotoxins and behaviors are caused by life, not a "biochemical imbalance."
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 10:23 #93

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Connect Dots wrote:
.....As stated on the thread, psychiatric medications are neurotoxins and behaviors are caused by life, not a "biochemical imbalance."

Thanks, that seems simple enough so I don't know why this thread has run to 5 pages to say it..:)
As I've said before in TZ, long posts, long threads, long links and long videos put many people off reading them (including me) because we think "I don't have the time and inclination to wade through them"

Regarding meds, I once had a lady neighbour with mental problems and I knocked her door to befriend her with a box of Christmas crackers for us to pull, she invited me in and we had fun pulling away, and I suggested we could perhaps have a walk on the park together sometime, or I could accompany her to her day centre or have a stroll round town.
But she avoided giving me a straight answer and said "I got schizophrenia, I have to take tablets or I get aggressive".
It's like I said in an earlier post, some patients don't seem to want to be befriended, as if they've written themselves off and are content to stay in their own little world.
I knocked her door one more time about a week later but she never answered so I gave up on her.

PS- are patients on meds happy to take them, and do they have a beneficial effect or not? What do the patients say?
Last Edit: 05 May 2019 10:26 by Ugh.
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 10:43 #94

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Ugh wrote:
Thanks, that seems simple enough so I don't know why this thread has run to 5 pages to say it..:)
I could not have been more clear in what I said.

It is your responsibility to read the member's posts, and not comment if you have not.
Connect Dots wrote:
We should be calling psychiatric drugs “neurotoxins,” because that’s what they are . . .
It makes sense that what we don't want to do is disrupt normal neurotransmission in the brain.
Connect Dots wrote:
As opposed to the present paradigm, because it is based on the bogus "biochemical imbalance" that erroneously puts people on harmful psychiatric drugs, we need a system that treats the patient as a human being who needs help dealing with life.

And if you're not willing to take the time to read articles posted and listen to the real-life testimony of people on videos that supports members' statements, that's your problem.
Last Edit: 05 May 2019 11:31 by Connect Dots. Reason: Clarify
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 12:48 #95

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Connect Dots wrote:
. . .the movement and website Mad in America. . .
On this website, there is a section where patients and families of patients tell their personal stories.

One of the personal stories is told by Michele Waterman, in an article dated April 22, 2018, about her 16 years of treatment with psychiatric medication and what she is doing to recover. In the Comments section for her article, she details what her recovery protocol is:
Michele Waterman April 24, 2018 at 2:54 am

Hi there. Thanks for your feedback. I’m using a holistic protocol – basically radical self care (I spend time with my family every day, I exercise regularly, I do a forgiveness practice called ho’oponopono every night, I do a daily gratitude meditation, I spend time in nature with my goats, chickens, dogs, cats, and ducks). I’ve done an extensive lifestyle detox and I use lifestyle medicine. I’m in recovery (I haven’t had a drink for 16 years). I eat a very clean diet; good food = good mood. I don’t eat sugar, dairy, corn, soy, or gluten. I work with a holistic psychiatrist that specializes in helping women taper safely off of psych meds (Dr. Brogan). She has done blood work and we have determined which systems in my body need extra support (through supplementation), I do kundalini yoga (a very prescriptive yoga that aligns the energy centers in my body and assists with the detoxification, I just bought an infrared sauna, which I will use daily. As you may know, psych meds and other toxins get trapped in our visceral fat so I have to commit to a lengthy detox process to rid my body of these mind numb and havoc producing invaders. I also do daily coffee enemas which detox the liver, increase the production of bile, which helps with digestion, and it activates my parasympathetic nervous system, which increases calmness and peace in my nervous system. I also work with an ayurvedic doctor in San Jose, CA. He is an MD and naturalpath. He did additional testing and found that my liver isn’t working properly–no surprise after taking my psych med cocktail for 16 years.

www.madinamerica.com/2018/04/the-breaking-point/#comments

It was when her hair started breaking off that she googled "lithium and hair breakage" and discovered the book A Mind of Your Own: The Truth About Depression and How Women Can Heal Their Bodies to Reclaim Their Lives by Dr. Kelly Brogan.

That got her started on her road to recovery through holistic health care and life-style changes.
Last Edit: 05 May 2019 12:50 by Connect Dots. Reason: Clarify
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 13:49 #96

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Connect Dots wrote:
..if you're not willing to take the time to read articles posted and listen to the real-life testimony of people on videos that supports members' statements, that's your problem.

Mate, I turned 71 the other day and the clock is ticking down for me, so I simply don't have time to wade through long posts and videos..:)
"Our days may come to seventy years, or eighty, if our strength endures; yet the best of them are but trouble and sorrow, for they quickly pass, and we fly away" (Psalm 90:10)
Last Edit: 05 May 2019 13:51 by Ugh.
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 15:10 #97

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Ugh wrote:
Mate, I turned 71 the other day and the clock is ticking down for me, so I simply don't have time to wade through long posts and videos..:)
I'm 74 and I manage to do what it takes to educate myself.
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 15:24 #98

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People interested in psychiatry need to learn the term "medication spellbinding."

Dr. Peter Breggin explains it in the following video, where he maps out 4 main points:

1. Psychiatric drugs impair the patient's judgment about their effects.
2. On psychiatric drug(s) people are fooled into thinking that mood disturbances are caused by the people around them or situations, rather than by the drug(s).
3. Patients will think they're doing better than ever, which is just a drug-induced euphoria/high, something that is not healthy and is artificial.
4. People on psychiatric drugs will do unethical things they would never do if they weren't on psychiatric drugs.
Peter Breggin MD
Published on Dec 1, 2012

"What is Medication Spellbinding?" is 3rd in psychiatrist Peter Breggin's video series: Simple Truths in Psychiatry

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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 15:36 #99

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Connect Dots wrote:
Ugh wrote:
Mate, I turned 71 the other day and the clock is ticking down for me, so I simply don't have time to wade through long posts and videos..:)
I'm 74 and I manage to do what it takes to educate myself.
You should get a refund
You can't fix stupid
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Rethinking the Current Paradigm of Psychiatric Care 05 May 2019 16:36 #100

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Ugh wrote:
Mate, I turned 71 the other day and the clock is ticking down for me, so I simply don't have time to wade through long posts and videos..:)
Connect Dots wrote:
I'm 74 and I manage to do what it takes to educate myself.

Good for you mate, but personally I like to think there's nothing more for me to learn, and I agree with John Cleese (79) who once said- "As I've got older I've realised that nobody knows what they're talking about".
In fact I feel proud, arrogant and a true survivor at achieving 71, even Bear Grylls has got some catching up to do (if he can stay alive that long)..:)

PS- My brother-in law once taunted me by saying "Huh, you're not a man if you don't drink or smoke" because I've never touched the stuff.
He died of cancer a few years ago aged 64 but I'm still around, and his poor wife who doted on him has got to go through the rest of her life alone..
Last Edit: 05 May 2019 16:45 by Ugh.
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