Your donations are appreciated and help keep this site running. Even the smallest amount helps.
Thankyou

 
PROMOTE YOUR SITE
HERE
Only $3 USD/month
TRUTHSPOON.COM
The man they can't recruit!
Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: Ireland Wanted to Forget. But the Dead Don’t Always Stay Buried.

Ireland Wanted to Forget. But the Dead Don’t Always Stay Buried. 30 Dec 2018 12:00 #1

  • annabelle
  • annabelle's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Silver Member
  • Posts: 2231
  • Likes received: 1561


THE LOST CHILDREN OF TUAM

TUAM, Ireland

Behold a child.

A slight girl all of 6, she leaves the modest family farm, where the father minds the livestock and the mother keeps a painful secret, and walks out to the main road. Off she goes to primary school, off to the Sisters of Mercy.

Her auburn hair in ringlets, this child named Catherine is bound for Tuam, the ancient County Galway town whose name derives from a Latin term for “burial mound.” It is the seat of a Roman Catholic archdiocese, a proud distinction announced by the sky scraping cathedral that for generations has loomed over factory and field.

Two miles into this long-ago Irish morning, the young girl passes through a gantlet of gray formed by high walls along the Dublin Road that seem to thwart sunshine. To her right runs the Parkmore racecourse, where hard-earned shillings are won or lost by a nose. And to her left, the mother and baby home, with glass shards embedded atop its stony enclosure.

Behind this forbidding divide, nuns keep watch over unmarried mothers and their children. Sinners and their illegitimate spawn, it is said. The fallen.

But young Catherine knows only that the children who live within seem to be a different species altogether: sallow, sickly — segregated. “Home babies,” they’re called.

The girl’s long walk ends at the Mercy school, where tardiness might earn you a smarting whack on the hand. The children from the home are always late to school — by design, it seems, to keep them from mingling with “legitimate” students. Their oversize hobnail boots beat a frantic rhythm as they hustle to their likely slap at the schoolhouse door.

A sensitive child, familiar with the sting of playground taunts, Catherine nevertheless decides to repeat a prank she saw a classmate pull on one of these children. She balls up an empty candy wrapper and presents it to a home baby as if it still contains a sweet, then watches as the little girl’s anticipation melts to sad confusion.

Everyone laughs, nearly. This moment will stay with Catherine forever.

continued here.........www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/10/28/world/europe/tuam-ireland-babies-children.html
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Ireland Wanted to Forget. But the Dead Don’t Always Stay Buried. 30 Dec 2018 12:41 #2

  • Ugh
  • Ugh's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Silver Member
  • Name is Mick, Age 71, right winger, Christian, English
  • Posts: 3172
  • Likes received: 367
annabelle wrote:
..Behind this forbidding divide, nuns keep watch over unmarried mothers and their children. Sinners and their illegitimate spawn, it is said. The fallen..

I sometimes wonder if sadistic nuns have ever read the Bible at all-

"A father of the fatherless,....is God in His holy habitation" (Psalm 68:5)
"Learn to do good; Seek justice, Rebuke the oppressor, defend the fatherless..." (Isaiah 1:17)
"Thus says the Lord: Do no wrong to the fatherless, or the widow.." (Jer 22:3)
"You shall not afflict any widow or fatherless child" (Exodus 22:22)
"I will be a Father to you, and you shall be my sons and daughters says the Lord." (2 Cor 6:17/18 )

By robbing children of their innocence, some nuns will have a lot to answer for-
Jesus said:- "If anyone causes one of these little ones who believe in me to stumble, it would be better for him to have a large millstone hung around his neck and to be drowned in the depths of the sea" (Matt 18:6)


"People were bringing children to Jesus for him to bless them. When the disciples saw this, they rebuked them. But Jesus called the children to him and said, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of God belongs to such as these” {Luke 18:15)

Last Edit: 31 Dec 2018 04:41 by Ugh.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Ireland Wanted to Forget. But the Dead Don’t Always Stay Buried. 30 Dec 2018 23:21 #3

  • Truthspoon
  • Truthspoon's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Member
  • One foot in hyperspace and the other in some dogshit.
  • Posts: 1807
  • Likes received: 993
Why would you post Jew York Times propaganda here?

I've no doubt the Catholics are fucked....but I won't have the Goddamn Kikes lecture me about it.
Last Edit: 30 Dec 2018 23:22 by Truthspoon.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Ireland Wanted to Forget. But the Dead Don’t Always Stay Buried. 30 Dec 2018 23:42 #4

  • annabelle
  • annabelle's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Silver Member
  • Posts: 2231
  • Likes received: 1561
Given the misogyny, morality, and economics that informed the public debate of the time — when a pregnancy out of wedlock could threaten a family’s plans for land inheritance, and even confer dishonor upon a local priest — imagine that naïve young woman from the country: impregnated by a man, sometimes a relative, who would assume little of the shame and none of the responsibility.

She might flee to England, or pretend that the newborn was a married sister’s — or be shipped to the dreaded Tuam home, run by a religious order with French roots called the Congregation of Sisters of Bon Secours.

Born in a workhouse and left in the care of the Bon Secours, Julia became an employee who lived in the home for almost 40 years. Although she died in 1985, her rare insight into this insulated world — one she described as “unnatural” — lives on in taped interviews.

The gates remained unlocked to accommodate deliveries, but so powerful was the sense of cultural imprisonment that you dared not leave. Save for the chance gift of a cake from the bread man, you starved for love or consolation over the loss of your innocent courting days.

“Many a girl shed tears,” Julia said.

The Bon Secours sisters who watched your every move were doing the bidding of Irish society. They, too, existed in a repressive patriarchy with few options for women. They might have experienced a spiritual calling as a young girl, or simply desired not to be a farmer’s wife, having seen overworked mothers forever pregnant, forever fretting. A vocation offered education, safety and status, all reflected in clean, freshly pressed habits.

And Julia remembered them all.

Mother Hortense had a big heart, yet was quick to punish; Mother Martha was more enlightened, but a thump from her could “put you into the middle of next week.” This one hated the mere sight of children, while that one used kindness the way others used the rod. So it went.

The sisters frequently threatened banishment to the mental asylum in Ballinasloe, or to one of the Magdalen Laundries: institutions where women perceived to be susceptible or errant — including “second offenders” who had become pregnant again — were often sent to work, and sometimes die, in guilt-ridden servitude.

You preferred instead to suffer at the mother and baby home, bracing for that day when, after a year or so of penitent confinement, you were forced to leave — almost always without your child. Waiting for that moment of separation, Julia recalled, was “like Our Lady waiting for the Crucifixion.”

Typical is the story of one unmarried woman who had been sent to the home from a remote Galway farm. Determined to remain close to her child, she took a job as a cleaner at a nearby hospital and, for several years, she appeared at the home’s door on her day off every week to say the same thing:

That’s my son you have in there. I want my son. I want to rear him.

No, would come the answer. And the door would close.

Parents warned children that if they were bad they’d go right to “the home.” And even though the babies were baptized as a matter of routine, there remained the hint of sulfur about them.

“They were the children of the Devil,” recalled Kevin O’Dwyer, 67, a retired principal who grew up just yards from the home. “We learned this in school.”

www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/10/28/world/europe/tuam-ireland-babies-children.html

Last Edit: 30 Dec 2018 23:56 by annabelle.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Ireland Wanted to Forget. But the Dead Don’t Always Stay Buried. 31 Dec 2018 03:09 #5

  • annabelle
  • annabelle's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Silver Member
  • Posts: 2231
  • Likes received: 1561
Frannie Hopkins was about 9, Barry Sweeney, about 7. The two were at the fledgling stage of boyhood mischief as they monkeyed around some crab apple trees, all within view of the deserted home that figured in their fertile imagination.

Some evenings, Frannie’s father would delay his pint at the Thatch Bar, at the top of the town, until he had watched his son race down the Athenry Road, dodging ghosts from the old home to his left and the cemetery to his right, all the way to the family’s door. But on this autumn day in the early 1970s, the boys were daring in the daylight.

Jumping into some overgrowth at the property’s southwest corner, they landed on a concrete slab that echoed in answer. Curious, they pushed aside the lid to reveal a shallow, tank-like space containing a gruesome jumble of skulls and bones.

Frannie nudge-bumped Barry, and the younger lad fell in. He started to cry, as any boy would, so Frannie pulled him out and then the two boys were running away, laughing in fun or out of fright. They told everyone they met, prompting Frannie’s father to say he’d get a right kick in the arse if he went back to that spot.

County workers soon arrived to level that corner of the property. The police said they were only famine bones. A priest said a prayer. And that was that.

In adulthood, Barry Sweeney would go to England to find work, and Frannie Hopkins would travel the world as an Irish soldier. Both would return to Tuam, where their shared story would come up now and then in the pub or on the street.

People would tell them they were either mistaken or lying. Barry would become upset that anyone would doubt a story that had so affected him, but Frannie would take pains to reassure him.

Barry, he would say. The truth will out.

Now, 40 years later, here was Catherine Corless, amateur historian, trying to unearth that truth, applying what she had learned in her community center research class: Use “why” a lot.

When her headaches and panic attacks eased, she pored over old newspapers in a blur of microfilm. She spent hours studying historic maps in the special collections department of the library at the national university in Galway City. One day she copied a modern map of Tuam on tracing paper and placed it over a town map from 1890.

And there it was, in the cartographic details from another time: A tank for the home’s old septic system sat precisely where the two boys had made their ghastly discovery. It was part of the Victorian-era system’s warren of tunnels and chambers, all of which had been disconnected in the late 1930s.

Did this mean, then, that the two lads had stumbled upon the bones of home babies? Buried in an old sewage area?

“I couldn’t understand it,” Catherine said. “The horror of the idea.”

Acting on instinct, she purchased a random sample from the government of 200 death certificates for children who had died at the home. Then, sitting at the Tuam cemetery’s edge in the van of its caretaker, she checked those death certificates against all the burials recorded by hand in two oversize books.

Only two children from the home had been buried in the town graveyard. Both were orphans, both “legitimate.”

Neither the Bon Secours order nor the county council could explain the absence of burial records for home babies, although it was suggested that relatives had probably claimed the bodies to bury in their own family plots. Given the ostracizing stigma attached at the time to illegitimacy, Catherine found this absurd.

In December 2012, Catherine’s essay, titled “The Home,” appeared in the historical journal of Tuam. After providing a general history of the facility, it laid out the results of her research, including the missing burial records and the disused septic tank where two boys had stumbled upon some bones.

“Is it possible that a large number of those little children were buried in that little plot at the rear of the former Home?” she wrote. “And if so, why is it not acknowledged as a proper cemetery?”

She also shared her own memories, including that joke she and a classmate had played on two home babies long ago. “I thought it funny at the time how those little girls hungrily grabbed the empty sweet papers, but the memory of it now haunts me,” she wrote.

Her daring essay implicitly raised a provocative question: Had Catholic nuns, working in service of the state, buried the bodies of hundreds of children in the septic system?

Catherine braced for condemnation from government and clergy — but none came. It was as if she had written nothing at all.

There was a time when Catherine wanted only to have a plaque erected in memory of these forgotten children. But now she felt that she owed them much more. “No one cared,” she said. “And that’s my driving force all the time: No one cared.”

She kept digging, eventually paying for another spreadsheet that listed the names, ages, and death dates of all the “illegitimate” children who had died in the home during its 36-year existence.

The sobering final tally: 796.

Measles. Influenza. Gastroenteritis. Meningitis. Whooping cough. Tuberculosis. Severe undernourishment, also known as marasmus.

Nine home babies died in 1930. Eleven in 1931. Twenty-four in 1932. Thirty-two in 1933.

The Tuam home was not alone. Children born out of wedlock during this period were nearly four times more likely to die than “legitimate” children, with those in institutions at particular risk. The reasons may be many — poor prenatal care, insufficient government funding, little or no training of staff – but this is certain: It was no secret.

In 1934, the Irish parliament was informed of the inordinate number of deaths among this group of children. “One must come to the conclusion that they are not looked after with the same care and attention as that given to ordinary children,” a public health official said.

Thirty died in the Tuam home that year.

In 1938, it was 26. In 1940, 34. In 1944, 40.

In 1947, a government health inspector filed a report describing the conditions of infants in the nursery: “a miserable emaciated child…delicate…occasional fits…emaciated and delicate…fragile abscess on hip…not thriving wizened limbs emaciated…pot-bellied emaciated…a very poor baby…”

That year, 52 died.

Catherine felt obligated to these children. Continuing to plumb the depths of the past, she eventually cross-checked her spreadsheet of 796 deceased home babies with the burial records of cemeteries throughout counties Galway and Mayo. Not one match.

“They’re not in the main Tuam graveyard where they should have been put initially,” she remembers thinking. “They’re not in their mothers’ hometown graveyards. Where are they?”

Catherine, of course, already knew.

www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/10/28/world/europe/tuam-ireland-babies-children.html






Ground penetrating radar at Tuam (above) has discovered 'significant quantities' of human remains, aged 35 foetal weeks to two years
Last Edit: 31 Dec 2018 03:23 by annabelle.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Ireland Wanted to Forget. But the Dead Don’t Always Stay Buried. 31 Dec 2018 04:47 #6

  • Ugh
  • Ugh's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Silver Member
  • Name is Mick, Age 71, right winger, Christian, English
  • Posts: 3172
  • Likes received: 367
In the olden days (70 years ago or more) getting preggers out of wedlock was such a heinous social crime that a lot of women quietly had abortions to cover it up and the foetuses were slung away like rubbish.
When my unmarried mother was preggers with me in 1948 she could have had me aborted and nobody would have minded, but as the fetus in question, I might have minded..:)
(She and my old man had a shotgun wedding instead)
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.

Ireland Wanted to Forget. But the Dead Don’t Always Stay Buried. 31 Dec 2018 05:02 #7

  • annabelle
  • annabelle's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Silver Member
  • Posts: 2231
  • Likes received: 1561
Truthspoon wrote:
Why would you post Jew York Times propaganda here?

I've no doubt the Catholics are fucked....but I won't have the Goddamn Kikes lecture me about it.

Because in this particular case.........the contents of the article have been verified as true..(found the nytimes article at the twitter account of a Hollyweird movie star btw) twitter.com/RealJamesWoods?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

You seem quite annoyed,, or perhaps a wee bit annoyed, perhaps just a little wee bit bothered...that I would post a Jew York Times article as the source but are you even the tiniest bit equally annoyed at the contents of the article itself?? (I suppose I should assume you did not read it) nevertheless..................are you (equally) bothered that hundreds of babies and children were buried in unmarked mass graves and forgotten? just in this one place alone? are you bothered or annoyed that babies real mothers had the door shut in their faces when they wanted to take them home? that the government knew full well that babies were dying of undernourishment (starvation) and illnesses to a disturbing degree yet had no conscience about it and continued it's under-funding and neglect as more and more babies and children died? does it bother you that vaccine trials were done on these poor, under-valued and neglected children? that the use of these babies. toddlers and children's dead remains were used for anatomical research in medical colleges? or is it my use of the source of this information and the source alone that bothers you?

When the initial, true and original source (an Irish housewife) of this research and information had it published locally and on a community level.....NO ONE CARED....she was expecting a harsh response, she expected curiosity, interest as well as anger launched towards herself by her surrounding community and local authorities for bringing the very touchy subject up in a public way (through a written article) but she needn't have been concerned at the time because.........there was NO RESPONSE WHATSOEVER....it was as if she had not brought it up at all. It was completely and entirely ignored.

This angered her. She was not an activist of any sort but a quiet and reserved person who found what she was finding out in her research of the Tuam mothers and children's home disturbing.

It was only with the none reaction that her research findings had, the none response, that she came to the conclusion that no one seemed to care about what had happened to these children.....in life or in death.....it was then she decided to contact what would be called the Irish mainstream media. They ended up publishing it on the front cover of their national newspaper. Only then did the relevant authorities express feigned interest, shock and sadness, the very same authorities who had previously ignored the topic altogether.

Only then was an official inquiry started, an official investigation which verified her findings. an investigation that uncovered large quantities of human remains of babies and children in the septic system of Tuam's home for mothers and babies. There are many more previous homes for mothers and babies that are now being investigated and searched for bodies in Ireland. Sure the government is embarrassed because they knew for so long what was going on, they participated in it, pharmaceutical companies were involved, the medical colleges were involved, the government was involved, the Catholic church was involved, the school system was involved, the community was involved, the Irish State was involved, the very culture of Ireland itself was involved. The findings of the inquiry itself may well end up being manipulated and covered up to lessen the embarrassment but for the sake of the babies, the children, the mothers, the survivors and for the sake of Ireland itself it is a reality that needs to be told.
Last Edit: 31 Dec 2018 05:38 by annabelle.
Only registered members can reply. Create an Account to join the discussion.
Moderators: novum, rodin, Flare
Powered by Kunena Forum

Annual Server Target

Whether its 50 cents or five dollars, your donations are appreciated and help keep this community site running so we can all continue to enjoy using it. Secure transactions via paypal.
This target is to meet our server cost for one year, June 2019 - May 2020, in USD.
$ 340 - Target
( £ 278 GBP )
donation thermometer
donation thermometer
$ 160 - Raised
( £ 130 GBP )
donation thermometer
47%
Updated
2nd October 2019

No one is obliged to donate, please only donate what you can afford. Even the smallest amount helps. Being an active member is a positive contribution. Thank You.